Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us money per month for bills, and since we don't believe in showing ads to our users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
 
  • Post
  • Reply
Headhunter
Jun 3, 2003
One - You lock the target

UK person here. I'm so jealous of your national parks. My wife and I went to a few on our honeymoon road trip and the pictures in the OP are making me want to go again (once y'all don't have the Covid that is). We went to Yosemite, Grand Canyon, Bryce Canyon, Zion, Death Valley and Joshua Tree. Every one of them was stunningly beautiful and I feel like we barely scratched the surface in any of them.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

LostCosmonaut
Feb 15, 2014



One of the less famous national parks that I'm a big fan of is Black Canyon of the Gunnison. Visited it last year and it was real cool, and not too busy (not much else going on in southwest Colorado). Was also the only time I've ever actually seen a bear in the wild.

Pinus Porcus
May 14, 2019

Ranger McFriendly


z0331 posted:

Reading about the John Muir thing, it's pretty crazy how insanely racist and terrible people involved in conservation and naturalism were in that era.

By non-technical climbs, do you mean the iron rung trails? We've done most of the big-name ones, including Beehive, Jordan Cliffs, and Precipice. We actually took a trip up in October last year for the Precipice since it's closed for peregrine falcon nesting when we're usually there.

The iron-rung trails are fun and well designed, but can be really crowded, especially the Beehive.

Honestly, I think we've done most of the more well known trails on the eastern side and several on the western. We had planned on trying to snag a campsite at Duck Harbor this year but, you know. One of these days I kind of want to try snowshoeing on the carriage roads.

It can be hard to reconcile it, especially since if you are in certain college/career disciplines, Muir, Roosevelt, even Pinchot get put on a bit of a pedestal. Then you learn more and it's like, 'ah, come on, not you guys too!'

That's exactly what I was talking about! I was there almost a decade ago and did Precipice. That concept (at the time) was pretty unique in the NPS, that's awesome they still have those trails.

You are lucky that you get to keep going back, I Ioved Bar Harbor and Acadia. If I ever cross country move again, it would be to go there.

xzzy
Mar 5, 2009



Headhunter posted:

UK person here. I'm so jealous of your national parks. My wife and I went to a few on our honeymoon road trip and the pictures in the OP are making me want to go again (once y'all don't have the Covid that is). We went to Yosemite, Grand Canyon, Bryce Canyon, Zion, Death Valley and Joshua Tree. Every one of them was stunningly beautiful and I feel like we barely scratched the surface in any of them.

Well I'm jealous of your right to roam.

Land owner rights are absolute in the US, it's perfectly legal to block access to public land if one has to cross private land to get there.

So we got the awesome national parks, you get to enjoy your whole country. Which is better? Both obviously but it is not to be.

i say swears online
Mar 4, 2005

medio de fonte leporum surgo amariter




https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1286021372070830084

weird how they want to pass good legislation when the pitchforks are coming

Rick
Feb 23, 2004
And now the whole nation - pulpit and all - will take up the war-cry, and shout itself hoarse, and mob any honest man who ventures to open his mouth; and presently such mouths will cease to open.

That bill is good, at least some of the reason the parks are in trouble is miners and loggers skipping out on the cleanup after making huge profits so being able to pull in some of money that these companies are making would go a long way. Also it would make these areas less profitable, thus less attractive, which also is nice.

Suspect Bucket
Jan 14, 2012

SHRIMPDOR WAS A MAN
I mean, HE WAS A SHRIMP MAN
er, maybe also A DRAGON
or possibly
A MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL TEAM
BUT HE WAS STILL
SHRIMPDOR




And then Florida applauded.

Hey John Muir? Let's talk about poo poo that didn't happen. Ugh. "A Thousand Mile Walk To The Gulf" is a wonderful tale of exploration, both about the wilds of America and into realizing John Muir was a real shithead racist when he wrote this. The style of dismissive racisim is very enlightening.

I definitely reccomend reading it though. Free e-book on Sierra Club's website. https://vault.sierraclub.org/john_muir_exhibit/writings/a_thousand_mile_walk_to_the_gulf/

Funny enough, I recall I first read that while I was sitting in a Florida State Park (Pumpkin Hill in Jacksonville, it's lovely there) very much like the area he was describing. I was so happy getting to a bit exactly like where I was, and then I threw the book at a tree when I read the above. gently caress you, John Muir, ruining my nice day.

Suspect Bucket fucked around with this message at 13:49 on Jul 23, 2020

Zero One
Dec 30, 2004

Z is the new C

I picked up an annual pass today and hit up Canaveral National Seashore and Merritt Island NWR.




I'll get some wildlife photos up later after I pull them ftom my dslr.

Zero One
Dec 30, 2004

Z is the new C

Merritt Island







SoR Blaze
Apr 12, 2006


After having made the pilgrimage to Joshua Tree 3-4 times a year for the past 5 years, my wife and I moved to Yucca Valley to be close to the park. We've lived here for about a year and just now closed on our first house here in YV. I get to catch beautiful sunsets year round, and check out the wildlife all over town (mostly quail, coyotes, cactus wrens, red tailed hawks, great horned owls, kangaroo rats, antelope squirrels, and a metric ton of common ground squirrels). Also Black Rock campground is accessible directly through YV so I can make a quick 5 minute drive to enjoy the fire pits at night.

I'm constantly astounded by the natural beauty here, and I'm so glad we're living here permanently. Of course, the tourists from Los Angeles are really annoying about not wearing their masks and I feel like I see one climbing a Joshua Tree every time I go in the park. I love this place and was once also a tourist (but not an rear end in a top hat who climbs the trees!), but I can definitely see why outsiders are seen as such a nuisance here.

Hekk
Oct 12, 2012

'smeper fi


SoR Blaze posted:

After having made the pilgrimage to Joshua Tree 3-4 times a year for the past 5 years, my wife and I moved to Yucca Valley to be close to the park. We've lived here for about a year and just now closed on our first house here in YV. I get to catch beautiful sunsets year round, and check out the wildlife all over town (mostly quail, coyotes, cactus wrens, red tailed hawks, great horned owls, kangaroo rats, antelope squirrels, and a metric ton of common ground squirrels). Also Black Rock campground is accessible directly through YV so I can make a quick 5 minute drive to enjoy the fire pits at night.

I'm constantly astounded by the natural beauty here, and I'm so glad we're living here permanently. Of course, the tourists from Los Angeles are really annoying about not wearing their masks and I feel like I see one climbing a Joshua Tree every time I go in the park. I love this place and was once also a tourist (but not an rear end in a top hat who climbs the trees!), but I can definitely see why outsiders are seen as such a nuisance here.

I love Joshua Tree and the high desert. I've never seen night skies as bright and clear as I have out there. There is something about the ruggedness and danger that comes from being in such a harsh place. At first glance you might think that nothing lives out there but when you look closer you see how everything is adapted to survive in the sweltering heat and with so little rain.

However, I also lived in Yucca Valley for 7 years and some of the desert folks in San Bernardino county are something else.

Joose Caboose
Apr 17, 2013


Going to Shenandoah next week for the first time and have done much less research than I normally do before visiting parks. We’ll be there a few days and know we’ll do Old Rag one day (during the week) but any other favorite recommendations? We’re camping at Big Meadows and down for some long day hikes or just especially fun/cool ones that may not be full of all the people?

TangoFox
Jan 28, 2016


Zero One posted:

I picked up an annual pass today and hit up Canaveral National Seashore and Merritt Island NWR.




I'll get some wildlife photos up later after I pull them ftom my dslr.

There is some wicked camping in Canaveral National Seashore with a kayak or canoe. Push off from the mainland and paddle out to one of the many island campsites. You have a whole island (and a million mosquitoes) to yourself.

Mercury Ballistic
Nov 14, 2005

not gun related

Heads up to any us veterans that now national parks are free admission.

Alastor
Nov 18, 2007
I am the cream filling.

LostCosmonaut posted:

One of the less famous national parks that I'm a big fan of is Black Canyon of the Gunnison. Visited it last year and it was real cool, and not too busy (not much else going on in southwest Colorado). Was also the only time I've ever actually seen a bear in the wild.

Will vouch for this. Went to college in Gunnison. I go back every year. The Black Canyon will make you feel small and fragile in a big way. The Grand Canyon is longer, but the highest cliffs in North America are in the Black Canyon, and there's no railing at the highest point. If you truly want to poo poo yourself and feel dizzy because you're so far up that you lose the ability to tell which way up is, this is the place for you.

Also, park is a complete secret. I believe this is the least used, but in my mind the most amazing, of all the National Parks.

The Rat
Aug 29, 2004

You will find no one to help you here. Beth DuClare has been dissected and placed in cryonic storage.



Alastor posted:

Will vouch for this. Went to college in Gunnison. I go back every year. The Black Canyon will make you feel small and fragile in a big way. The Grand Canyon is longer, but the highest cliffs in North America are in the Black Canyon, and there's no railing at the highest point. If you truly want to poo poo yourself and feel dizzy because you're so far up that you lose the ability to tell which way up is, this is the place for you.

Also, park is a complete secret. I believe this is the least used, but in my mind the most amazing, of all the National Parks.

North rim is usually not very crowded, and the better choice if you want to hike to the bottom. The permits are self serve rather than limited count at the visitors center.

Alastor
Nov 18, 2007
I am the cream filling.

The Rat posted:

North rim is usually not very crowded, and the better choice if you want to hike to the bottom. The permits are self serve rather than limited count at the visitors center.

That is also where the tallest cliff is, at Exclamation Point.

The site where, for the first time in my life, I felt like I might actually poo poo myself.

The Rat
Aug 29, 2004

You will find no one to help you here. Beth DuClare has been dissected and placed in cryonic storage.



Alastor posted:

That is also where the tallest cliff is, at Exclamation Point.

The site where, for the first time in my life, I felt like I might actually poo poo myself.

I had an experience like that too, but in reverse. Was at the bottom of the SOB draw, about to come back up. (Within sight of exclamation point, at the bottom on the north shore.) I heard some climber up above yell ROCK and I looked up and saw a bigass rock coming off the side of the nearer cliff breaking off about 200m up the draw. It hit the draw and shattered and poo poo started coming all downhill pretty hard. Ducked behind a large rock I was near and waited for it all to go over my head.

Also I dunno what these huge bugs are but there were a bunch at the bottom of the canyon and it was super neat. Looked like fairies shimmering in the sunlight as they were flying around.

HamAdams
Jun 29, 2018

yospos


The Rat posted:

Also I dunno what these huge bugs are but there were a bunch at the bottom of the canyon and it was super neat. Looked like fairies shimmering in the sunlight as they were flying around.


looks like maybe salmonfly?

wilfredmerriweathr
Jul 11, 2005


I forget what they are called but they are all over the place.


I got married at the north rim. Black canyon is one special place.

Acebuckeye13
Nov 2, 2010

There's only one prescription for Nazism and it's 76mm HVAP





Ultra Carp

I'm actually looking to stop at Black Canyon on my way cross-country later this month, any advice?

Also, sorry for neglecting this thread! In penance, have some photos from various parks I stopped by last year:

Comet NEOWISE at Grand Canyon:





Sunrise at the Black Bridge over the Colorado:



Hike to Druid's Arch in Canyonlands:





A stark field of black basalt at Craters of the Moon:



Bighorn sheep chillin' in Badlands:



And finally, a wolf standing off against a herd of bison in the early morning mist at Yellowstone:



man parks are cool

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

SirPhoebos
Dec 10, 2007

Horned Rat-Sempai Noticed Me!


I'm looking into visiting a National Park in Alaska. I've done drive-up camping, and while I want to learn backcountry camping, making my first try in Alaska doesn't strike me as the best idea. Are any of the Alaskan parks (relatively) beginner friendly?

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply