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Elmnt80
Dec 30, 2012

OH NOOOO!





Welcome to the first fishing thread to hopefully unite the ask/tell fishing thread goons and the take a hike fishing thread goons. Here we talk about fishing in all its varied forms, post pictures of fish we caught, share stories of how we caught a fish that was totally huge but we didn't have a camera on us and show off the dumb dick shaped lures we bought on aliexpress!

-------
FAQ

I want to start fishing, is it hard?
Fishing is one of those things where you can learn the basics in a few weeks and then spend the rest of your life mastering it. Its a wide ranging sport with tons of variety and lots of little niches that you may come to enjoy!

Is it expensive?
You can start fishing very cheaply by buying a cheap rod and reel combo available at just about any store that sells outdoors equipment, some line (if the combo comes with line, rip it off and replace it with new line) and a few very basic lures. With some luck at a garage sale, flea market or thrift store you can get started even cheaper! From there you can stay super cheap or go off into the wide world of $400 swimbaits. There are options at just about any price point you can imagine and you can catch fish at all of them! Even the goons in this thread run the gamut from garage sale finds to fancy uptown fly fishing rigs with a price tag that even makes my eyes water. Don't worry, nobody is going to look down on you for not having the latest and greatest!

Where should I fish?
Pretty much anywhere you have more than 6" of water and food for them, you'll find fish. Part of the fun is exploring and finding new places, but never be afraid to ask in this thread for recommendations. We have goons from all over and from every kind of background who will be more than happy to talk your ear off about all the places you should be looking for fish.

Whats the best lure/rod/reel/line?
The one that works for your budget, skill level, conditions and local fish. Quite frankly that's the best answer we can give without knowing the conditions where you live and its still quite likely that there is no real "best" option.

Will you make fun of me for making a dumb mistake?
Probably, and then we'll start sharing stories about all the times we made the exact same mistake and trying to one up each other on how dumb we all are. Just about any mistake you can make has been made so unless you somehow manage to start WW3 by fishing, you're fine.
-------
Lets talk kinds of reels and uses!


This is a spincaster, your most basic kind of reel and is the simplest to use. Literally push a button and cast. Generally seen as a reel for children by the more elitist fishermen you'll run into, but there are plenty of adults that still use them and value them for their simplicity and durability. The can have issues with line management that make them frustrating to use on occasion but still a perfectly good option for a beginning angler. You can run into a quality ceiling pretty quick with new spincasters because of the perception


This is your basic spinning reel. Most of the time this is what people upgrade to from a basic spincaster or start at this point. There are tons of anglers who never stop using a spinning reel because they see no reason to jump into baitcasters. Even the most elitist anglers will have at least one spinning setup. They are still very simple to use but do take slightly more effort to master than a spincaster. You can spend basically any amount you want to a spinning reel and get into some very high dollar finesse reels if that turns out to be your jam. Expect to wind up with this as the recommended starting point from most of the anglers in this thread. These reels do come in different sizes and if you're looking for a basic setup to fish for 1-5lb fish, a 20/2000 or 30/3000 size reel will work best. Use the one that fits your hand best because that is more important than just about anything else.



And here we have masochism and frustration personified. This is an open faced baitcaster in the two most common styles, low profile and round. They tend to be more expensive than the equivalent spinning reel, take a good bit of patience to learn and I don't think even professional anglers could be called an absolute master of this reel. There is a mix of controls on the reel, some automatic and some done with the thumb that all have to come together to make a cast. Messing this up will result in a pile of knotted line around the spool called a birdsnest or backlash. If you see an angler yanking line out of one of these reels while looking annoyed, they just backlashed. Pity them. Now, with that said, why would you ever one to use one of these things? Because you can get a much heavier duty reel in a lighter and smaller package than the equivalent spinning reel and the control you can exert over your cast is second to none. Its also supposed to cast farther than a spinning reel, but results vary by angler. I've been fishing for around 25 years, 10 with baitcasters and I can maybe get 5-10ft more on a long cast. Once you get the hang of it, you can minimize backlashes and its a very satisfying experience but it takes practice to get there.
-------
Now lets talk about rods.

Rods are broken down into two main categories, spinning rods and casting rods. Spinning rods can be identified by the large 1st guide (a guide is the hole the line goes through). A casting rod will have a much smaller 1st guide and almost all casting rods have a trigger on the opposite side of the reel seat from your reel.Spincasters and baitcasters go on casting rods, spinning reels go on spinning rods. Simple, right?

Now we get into the more complex stuff: rod action and power.

Lets start with power first.

You generally run from ultralight all the way up to heavy power rods, with them getting thicker at each step. The thicker the rod, the stiffer it is and this generally means you can throw hardier and heavier tackle. This part is simple, but once you throw in rod action, it gets more complicated, so lets talk about rod action.



As you can see, rod action determines how far down the reel you go before it starts to flex. This is a super important thing because that amount of flex determines how you fight a fish and how easy it is to throw a lure. The more flex you have, the easier it is to cast a lighter lure but the less control you have of a fish during a fight. And of course the inverse of this is true. An extra fast rod will give you tons of control during a fight, but will make casting lighter lures more difficult. Now throw in rod power and you can get some interesting effects. A medium heavy slow action may throw a certain lure easier than a medium fast action rod, but the trade off in fish fighting ability is not worth it. This gets complicated really quick when you start trying to specialize, but a good rule of thumb for most fish over 1lb and under 5lbs is that a medium fast action rod for a spinning setup is a good all rounder.
-------
Common freshwater fish species

Shamelessly lifted from the old OP

quote:

If you write up your favorite species, I’ll add it to this part.


Sunfish
The first fish most anglers catch is this ubiquitous fish. These guys are almost everywhere and bite almost anything. Farm ponds and public lakes are loaded with these guys across the US. A good species to target if you’re just starting out. Look for shallow water with some sort of structure and access to food. Weeds, fallen timber, or places where runoff enters the lake are good places to start.


Catfish
Channel cats live in pretty much every river in the country, and most lakes. They’re aggressive predators and will eat just about anything. Worms and chicken livers are the best baits for these guys. Blue catfish are almost as common and will hit mostly the same baits. Look for moving water that provides access to food near structure such as brush piles, deep holes, or undercut river banks. The outside parts of bends in the river usually have the right combination of current, deep water, and structure. Bait a hook with a nightcrawler and weight it down with a 1-oz weight and throw the rig immediately upstream from such a bend. The best time of day is at dusk and early evening.
Flathead catfish run much bigger but require more advanced tactics.


Largemouth Bass
The most sought after gamefish in North America. This guy is a voracious eater and will aggressively defend his territory. A common tactic is to throw something loud and flashy and trigger a reflex bite rather than a feeding response. Tactics for largemouth are hotly debated and change throughout the year. Since largemouth bass can be territorial and hold on specific structure, they’re a tough species to target from shore, unless you find a good farm pond. Your best bet is from a boat or kayak where you can cover a significant amount of water.


Trout
There are 3 major species of trout in North America, Brown, Brook, and Rainbow. They largely overlap, depending on stocking and conditions. There’s most likely a good trout stream closer to you than you think. Trout like fast-moving cold water. Every trout on the planet will eat an earthworm, no exceptions. You can also use small spinners or flyfishing techniques. Trout can be very selective and require constant adaptation of your technique to consistently catch them. A friend of mine constantly advocates that “Trout don’t live in ugly places.” They’re a joy to catch and even more fun to hike around after.

If someone wants to do a basic primer on common saltwater fish types, I'll include it too.
-------
Fly Fishing

Shamelessly lifted from the old thread's OP

quote:

A quick word on fly fishing, my favorite type of fishing. Fly fishing uses a heavy floating line to deliver a tiny lure shaped like a little fly to fool trout or other species into biting. I fly fish because it makes me feel more connected to the stream I’m fishing. It a lot easier than it looks. If you want to learn, either ask a friend who fly fishes to show you the basics, or attend a free workshop at your local Bass Pro Shops or other fishing store. It’s easy to learn, but very difficult to teach yourself. If you have any questions, ask away!

BeastOfExmoor posted:

It's pretty difficult to cover a topic as diverse as fishing that varies so much from region to region, so it might be worth adding some regional/species links for sites or forums that people visit and have found helpful.

Here are a few I like:
Washington Lakes - A site specializing in fishing in Washington State. You can look at reports from lakes, rivers or saltwater areas that you fish to get an idea of what others are catching. The forums are actually surprisingly good and have a much lower percentage of idiots than most fishing forums I've been on.
IFish - Decent forum for the Pacific Northwest. Most users seem to be out of Oregon, but the info often works for Washington as well. Much higher percentage of idiots wanting to fight with each other about how declining Salmon/Steelhead numbers are all someone else's fault, but if you get into the subforums for Trout, Kokanee, and Bass there's a ton of good info.
Crappie.com - Great website for Crappie and Panfish fisherman. Easily the best species specific website I've seen.
-------
Previous fishing threads:
https://forums.somethingawful.com/showthread.php?threadid=3757986
https://forums.somethingawful.com/showthread.php?threadid=3480910
-------
Now lets talk about fish!

Elmnt80 fucked around with this message at 19:53 on Jul 18, 2020

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Elmnt80
Dec 30, 2012

OH NOOOO!





DeesGrandpa posted:

Caught some fishies. Got a shitton in a short time south of leadville, some pictured









This lure had em going nuts



Quoting this last post from the previous take a hike thread to say that those are some handsome fish and I do love me a jerkbait. I've got a couple in my box that I really need to be throwing.

Stalizard
Aug 11, 2006

Have I got a headache!

We're going fishing today, taking kayaks down the river and across a lil reservoir. Had a lot of success on the last trip just dead drifting nymphs forever as the kayak floated down the river, the hardest part is getting them all the way down because it gets like ten feet deep and all I have is regular floating fly line.

When we get to the reservoir I think I'm going to switch up and start stripping a big ol clouser minnow or something past grass and fall downs and see if I can get my first bass on the fly (and first bass in like a year, I'm a terrible bass fisherman). Exciting times!

Yooper
Apr 30, 2012



Grimey Drawer

Hi TGO fishing thread.



Went out for a couple of hours and caught a bass.

DeesGrandpa
Oct 21, 2009



Man I wish I had room for a Kayak.

Arrgytehpirate
Oct 2, 2011

I posted my food for USPOL Thanksgiving!





I like fishing and am glad there is a spot to post about fishing.

It’s addictive and very easy to get sucked down the rabbit hole.

Ghostnuke
Sep 21, 2005

Throw this in a pot, add some broth, a potato? Baby you got a stew going!




rod action will also have an effect when you're actually fighting the fish. a slow rod will make it easier to keep it pinned when it makes a sudden run because you've got more flex in the rod to absorb it.

Jump King
Aug 10, 2011



was going to go out today but stopped by my parents place and ended up having a pleasant conversation with them instead, ugh!!!

waffle enthusiast
Nov 16, 2007



Some notes on fly fishing

At its most basic fly fishing is about imitating aquatic insects to fool fish, as opposed to using lures/bait. However, modern fly fishing has evolved to cover many more scenarios. Much of the information below is specific to trout fishing as I don't know much about saltwater or warm water species.

How is fly fishing different from other types of fishing?

In traditional lure/bait fishing, a weighted lure does the work of the cast. In contrast, because flies are (effectively) unweighted, fly fishing uses a heavier line to send them to their target. Fly anglers will generally feed 10' to 20' of line out of the rod tip, and then use various casts to direct the fly line out into the water, which delivers the fly.

What type of equipment do I need?

To get started you'll need the following:

* A fly rod
* A fly reel
* fly fishing line, leader, and tippet
* flies of some sort
* Waders and wading boots (optional)


Fly rod

The type of fly rod you’ll want depends on the type of fish you want to catch. The two things you'll need to consider are rod length and weight. A shorter rod will be more useful in tight spaces like creeks, where brush and trees give you limited casting space. A longer rod will be useful on larger rivers in saltwater where you need more reach, or need to cast more line. The "weight" of a rod describes the line it's designed to cast. Smaller weights (2-3) are used for smaller fish and more delicate presentations. Average line weights (4-6) are useful for variety of situations and fish. Heavier line weights (6+) are usually used for bigger fish (e.g. carp) or saltwater applications (tarpon, bonefish, etc).

For trout fishing, a 9' 5-weight rod is a solid "all around" option. You can get a solid beginner outfit — rod, reel, and line — for around $200. A decent stand-alone rod will run you around $300-$500, and higher-end rods will start at $800 and go up from there. There are dozens of manufacturers, and new entrants every day, however some "blue chip" brands are Orvis, Sage, Redington, Scott, and G-Loomis. When buying a rod, take a note of the warranty. Most mid-level and higher rods come with a 25-year warranty that covers some or all of the cost of repair. This is useful because you will eventually break a rod tip.

Lastly, there are two primary types of fly rod material: graphite, and fiberglass. 90% of modern rods are graphite, which is known for having faster "action" (loads and unloads faster). Fiberglass rods are known for having a slower action, and therefore a slower casting stroke. This usually comes down to personal preference. If you can, cast a rod before you decide to buy it.


Reel

Used for line storage and fighting fish. There are two primary types of drag system: disc, and "click and pawl". When casting, the tension on the reel prevents excess line from unrolling. When fighting a fish, the reel will help tire the fish by providing resistance, while still allowing the fish to run.

Generally speaking, the "weight" of your reel, rod, and line should all be the same. Well-known brands include Orvis, Ross, Abel, Sage, and Nautilus.

When you get your reel — and before the shop loads up the line — be sure to setup the reel for the correct retrieve. If you use right left hand to cast, you'll want to have a left-handed retrieve, and vice versa. There's nothing worse than realizing your reel is setup for the wrong side after leaving the shop.

Line, leader, and tippet

* Fly line: The two primary types of fly line are floating and sinking. For most applications, a floating "weight forward" line allows for ease of casting and keeps the line on the water where you generally want it. Sinking line (or sink tip) is useful for streamer fishing. As above, the weight of the line should match the weight of the rod/reel.

* Leader: Fly line is a relatively heavy, PVC-coated monstrosity that will scare just about any fish that come within a few feet of it. To solve this problem, you'll attach a thin, tapered leader to the end of the line that connects the flies to the line. The longer the leader, the more subtle the presentation, but at the cost of control/connection to the fly. Dry fly leaders will typically be between 9' and 12'. Nymphing and streamer leaders will typically run in the 7.5' to 9' range. Leaders are typically constructed from fluorocarbon or monofilament. Monofilament floats better, and is cheaper. Fluorocarbon has a better sink rate (for nymph fishing) and is less visible in the water. It's also more expensive, but is rapidly becoming the "go to" option for most applications. Leader and tippet sizes are enumerated in "X", with larger numbers indicating thinner/more breakable materials.

* Tippet: Tippet is used for extra stealth, and to prevent the angler from constantly removing portions of their leader as they swap out flies throughout the day. Generally speaking the tippet should use the "3x" rule to match a fly. Divide the size of the fly by 3 and use a matching size tippet. For example, if you're fishing a size 16 fly, you should use 5x tippet. While you don't have to, you should probably buy and use tippet rings to attach your leader to your tippet. Tie a ring to your leader with a clinch knot. Then tie about 18-24" of tippet to the ring with another clinch knot:

==== fly line ======> ——————— leader ————————o—————tippet————fly


Once you get down to about 12" of tippet, cut it off and replace with a new section.

Pick up about three or four sizes of tippet that match the size of flies you intend to fish. Here in Colorado, I carry a spool each of 3x, 4x, 5x, and 6x.

Other stuff

A few items you’ll want to have on you:

* Hemostats: for de-barbing hooks, and removing hooks from fish. Unless you intend to eat your catch, **DE-BARB YOUR HOOKS**.
* Nippers: for trimming your knots and clipping tippet off the spool. You can spend as much or as little as you want here.
* Gel floatant: For keeping your dry flies buoyant.
* Dry shake: For making your dry flies buoyant after they've become water-logged.
* An indicator. This is not a bobber. Do not call it a bobber. Why would you call it that? No you're being defensive!
* Weight (for nymphing; optional): To get your nymphs down. Lead split shot is traditional. If, like me, you'd prefer not to use lead, you can also opt for JP's Tungsten Mud (video). If you're using one, you can mold it around your tippet ring.
* A net: If you're not backcountry fishing, use a net. Get one with a rubber basket and is appropriately sized for the fish you want to catch.


What is the difference between a fishing rod and a fishing pole?

About $400

Wading

* Waders: In colder water, you might opt for waders. In the summer these are almost completely optional, as most anglers opt to "wet wade" in shorts. Look for a pair that fits well. And whether you are in two inches or four feet of water always wear a wading belt.

* Wading boots: River beds are often treacherous places, with rocks the size of bowling balls that are just as slick. Wading boots provide added support and traction. They usually have either a felt sole, or a rubber sole. The choice of sole is usually dictated by the location you fish. Check with your local fly shop. They can be paired with waders in cooler temperatures, or used with shorts in the summer. If the places you fish don't have a sketchy bottom — such as a lake or a mellow river — you can skip wading boots altogether and opt for sandals, crocs, or wade barefoot.

Knots

Anglers seems to love knots. Realistically you only need to know a few.

* Clinch knot, for attaching flies to tippet. And here's a shortcut.
* Surgeon's Knot, for attaching leader to tippet, or connecting tippet to tippet.
* Blood knot, for attaching leader to fly line, and also leader to tippet.
* Non-slip loop knot, for attaching streamers (and some nymphs) to tippet. Good for imparting action to your flies.

Rigging:

How you rig your setup will depend on what flies you're using. Here are some common rigs.:

TODO: links

* Dry Fly
* Dry-dropper
* Nymph with indicator
* Streamer

How do I cast/What casts do I need to know?

Fundamentally, fly casting is about loading the rod, which then sends the line where you want it to go. Rather than write a treatise on it, I recommend you watch Pete Kutzer on the Orvis Youtube channel to understand the mechanics. A roll cast (youtube) will be the second most important cast to learn, and is invaluable in places where you can't backcast. If you can, practice on a lawn, or local body of water.

Flies

Fooling fish involves (generally) one of the following types of flies. Dry flies imitate adult insects and sit on top of the water. This is also considered the "purest" form of fly fishing. Nymphs imitate immature insects in their various forms, and ride somewhere within the water column. The primary food source for fish is underwater, so nymphing is usually much more productive than dry fly fishing. Lastly, streamers imitate smaller swimming prey and are used to entice larger fish to an opportunistic snack.

Which flies should I get?

This is heavily dependent on where and what you're fishing for. Even for the same species, you'll use different flies (and sizes) in different parts of the world. Your best option is to hit up your local fly shop and let them know what you're looking to catch. Buy a half-dozen or so of each fly. Eventually you'll discover confidence patterns that you frequently use. That said, here are a few "go to" fly patterns that seem to work well:

Trout:
* Dry Flies: Parachute Adams, Elk Hair caddis, Chubby Chernobyl, Stimulator, Royal Wulff, Griffiths' Gnat
* Nymphs: Gold ribbed hare's ear, pheasant tail, brassie, zebra midge, RS2, barr emerger, juju baetis, jujube midge
* Streamers: Wooly bugger.
* Others: San Juan worm

If I had just one fly for the rest of my life, it would be a Parachute Adams.

Carp: TBD
Bass: TBD
Saltwater: TBD

Streamer Fishing

TBD

Contact techniques (Euro)

In the last few decades, European-style "contact" nymphing has become all the rage. These techniques generally use longer rods, longer leader, and heavier flies. Rather than casting line out and letting the nymphs dead drift below an indicator or fly, the angler keeps a straight line between their flies drifting on the bottom and their rod. This allows them to feel a strike before they see it.

Saltwater

Someone should write this, or else start me up a Patreon so I can go to Belize

Tenkara

TBD


Other Resources

- The fly tying and tacklecraft thread.
- The Orvis YouTube channel: A great resource for casting, reading water, and rigging.
- Trout Rigs & Methods (book): Does what it says on the tin.
- Nymph Masters (book): one of the best books on modern nymphing out there. Covers many techniques.

Can you share your secret fly fishing location?

Sure. Don’t tell anyone else, but the Blue river at Silverthorne

waffle enthusiast fucked around with this message at 20:21 on Jul 18, 2020

Iymarra
Oct 4, 2010





Survived AGDQ 2018 Awful Games block!

Grimey Drawer

Can confirm that fishing goons are supremely helpful as a novice angler. If anyone is on the fence about getting started, don't hesitate any longer. Ask here, someone'll have great info.

dsipal
May 12, 2013




Arrgytehpirate posted:

It’s addictive and very easy to get sucked down the rabbit hole.

this. it can range from just chilling in nature sipping a beer with your friend not worried in the slightest about your line to eagerly anticipating a hit on your lure every cast. also once you start collecting lures there;s no going back.

Gooch181
Jan 1, 2008

The Gooch

Stalizard posted:

We're going fishing today, taking kayaks down the river and across a lil reservoir. Had a lot of success on the last trip just dead drifting nymphs forever as the kayak floated down the river, the hardest part is getting them all the way down because it gets like ten feet deep and all I have is regular floating fly line.

When we get to the reservoir I think I'm going to switch up and start stripping a big ol clouser minnow or something past grass and fall downs and see if I can get my first bass on the fly (and first bass in like a year, I'm a terrible bass fisherman). Exciting times!

Try some black wooly buggers too, I've caught quite a few bass on them.

Kazak_Hstan
Apr 28, 2014



Grimey Drawer

Around 40 million red salmon came back to Bristol Bay this year and I intend to catch about 150 of them. Getting v. excited!

Time
Aug 1, 2011

It Was All A Dream


Caught a honker

waffle enthusiast
Nov 16, 2007



Did a bit of an effort-post above on fly fishing but there are still lots of holes. Please send corrections/additions my way.

Woodpile
Mar 30, 2013



Extended my stay at the lake for a few days. Waiting for clouds/sunset before bottom fishing for catfish again. It's not glamorous, but sitting by the water drinking beer waiting for something to happen is my favorite kind of fishing.

Untrustable
Mar 16, 2009







Some anglers keep a few spinners as a second option to spincasts. Some of us don't grow up. Spincast 4 life (if the spincast in question was made pre-1990-ish)

Stalizard
Aug 11, 2006

Have I got a headache!

I caught a lil rainbow, my wife's paddle busted on a shoal so we had to cut the trip short but that's probably a good thing cause I'm here posting from the parking lot in a thunderstorm. Maybe tomorrow!

Behold the bounty of probably $400 worth of crap I never actually needed:

SEGA Ass Fisting
Feb 14, 2012

KEEP IT TIGHT!


Fishing spot last weekend. Chest waders are simply the best tool for staying the gently caress away from the hoards who have been invading my spots since Covid started. Not to many people willing to jump in a crick that can go from knee deep to nipple deep in a single step. Pics of fish when I feel less lazy - the catches were not impressive anyway. Also, to anyone getting into fishing in the age of Corona, I feel it's my duty as an angler to inform you that smoking weed and fishing is literally the greatest thing a human can do.



E: Ehh feeling slightly less lazy

Upstream


Bay-bee Striper, doo doo doo doo doo doo


Dink from the canal. Sadly, my only non panfish catch in the canal that day

Don't mind the pathetic goonbeard. I work from home now, so grooming is out the window until human interaction becomes a thing again.


Hopefully doing some Carpin' in the Delaware Canal tomorrow, but the crowds of bikers and dog walkers on the narrow towpath have been keeping me away

SEGA Ass Fisting fucked around with this message at 22:17 on Jul 18, 2020

King of Bees
Dec 28, 2012


Gravy Boat 2k

SEGA rear end Fisting posted:

smoking weed and fishing is literally the greatest thing a human can do.

It makes for such a nice day

fknlo
Jul 6, 2009




Fun Shoe

DeesGrandpa posted:

Man I wish I had room for a Kayak.

I haven't used mine or fished at all since I moved to Colorado. I even live super close to union reservoir. Laziness and a lack of options have kept me from going out I guess? I need to learn to fly fish before I eventually get out of here.

Stalizard
Aug 11, 2006

Have I got a headache!

Kayaks are good, everyone should have a kayak. Even a cheap one opens up a shitload of water that you'd never have access to if you're just busting the banks.

The only hard part is logistics, trying to find a buddy with a kayak and a car you can park downstream that can also carry the kayaks back upstream without $600 worth of Thule roof rack accessories.

So I guess everybody should have either a lovely pickup and a kayak or a station wagon and a kayak

Suspect Bucket
Jan 14, 2012

SHRIMPDOR WAS A MAN
I mean, HE WAS A SHRIMP MAN
er, maybe also A DRAGON
or possibly
A MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL TEAM
BUT HE WAS STILL
SHRIMPDOR


Fishing is irritating as gently caress don't lie to the nice people

Fishing is also cool as hell when you're good at dealing with or minimizing the stupid lovely parts.

Stalizard
Aug 11, 2006

Have I got a headache!

IDK how many of you saw what I was posting in the last A/T thread but I got talked into buying a great big 9wt switch rod and that means I get to learn how to spey cast

A lot of you just told me to roll with what they recommended at the shop, I am here to say confidently that nobody has ever tried to throw a switch rod here in Georgia. They all mostly laughed at me and conceded that I might could go for trophy striper in the lower Chattahoochee or also surf fish next time we go to Florida, which I intend to do a week from now when I go to pick up all the line I ordered.

Anyway once they call me when they have the line in stock I'll spool up and learn how to spey cast, I'm excited to hook up on striper and whatever salt water fish get in my way whenever that time comes again

Untrustable
Mar 16, 2009







Discount baits at the Walmart. Soft plastics gang represent.

rndmnmbr
Jul 3, 2012



I totaled my blazer a couple of years ago, and my tackle was one of the casualties - rods snapped in multiple places, good reels crushed, tacklebox scattered to hell and gone. Needless to say, I haven't had the heart for fishing since.

But that was then, and I'm thinking about throwing hundreds of dollars in the trash buying lures only to get outfished by children smart enough to baitfish instead getting back into the game. That being said, this time I want my unicorn rod - fiberglass 7.5'-8', medium-to-slow action spincast rod. I'm a bank fisher, so I want to be able to launch lures into low earth orbit. Is there any manufacturer still making fiberglass rods, or am I heading down the rabbit hole of rolling my own rod?

Yond Cassius
May 22, 2010

horny is prohibited

rndmnmbr posted:

But that was then, and I'm thinking about throwing hundreds of dollars in the trash buying lures only to get outfished by children smart enough to baitfish instead getting back into the game. That being said, this time I want my unicorn rod - fiberglass 7.5'-8', medium-to-slow action spincast rod. I'm a bank fisher, so I want to be able to launch lures into low earth orbit. Is there any manufacturer still making fiberglass rods, or am I heading down the rabbit hole of rolling my own rod?

It's expensive and four inches short of heaven for you , but the St. Croix "Legend Glass" might fit your bill. You're looking for LGS72MM.

Are you looking for a pure fiberglass rod, or are hybrids on the table? Hybrids open up a lot of options, I think.

Yond Cassius fucked around with this message at 07:56 on Jul 19, 2020

rndmnmbr
Jul 3, 2012



Yond Cassius posted:

It's expensive and four inches short of heaven for you , but the St. Croix "Legend Glass" might fit your bill. You're looking for LGS72MM.

Are you looking for a pure fiberglass rod, or are hybrids on the table? Hybrids open up a lot of options, I think.

Frankly, what I want is an old Eagle Claw rod like I grew up with, except one that I can mount a modern spinning reel on. Carbon fiber just doesn't feel the same in my hands. I would have to try a hybrid before I bought one.

e. Uhh... https://www.eagleclaw.com/cg-eagle-claw-crafted-glass-rods If I'm looking for a modernized old Eagle Claw fiberglass rod, maybe I should have checked Eagle Claw to begin with.

rndmnmbr fucked around with this message at 08:30 on Jul 19, 2020

Untrustable
Mar 16, 2009







rndmnmbr posted:

I totaled my blazer a couple of years ago, and my tackle was one of the casualties - rods snapped in multiple places, good reels crushed, tacklebox scattered to hell and gone. Needless to say, I haven't had the heart for fishing since.

But that was then, and I'm thinking about throwing hundreds of dollars in the trash buying lures only to get outfished by children smart enough to baitfish instead getting back into the game. That being said, this time I want my unicorn rod - fiberglass 7.5'-8', medium-to-slow action spincast rod. I'm a bank fisher, so I want to be able to launch lures into low earth orbit. Is there any manufacturer still making fiberglass rods, or am I heading down the rabbit hole of rolling my own rod?

Thrift stores, flea markets, swap meets, and garage sales are your best friends (wear a facemask and practice distancing). My dad rebuilds reels and makes custom rods out of the stuff we find at sales. Some of the fishing discord regulars have seen some of his stuff and honestly the best glass is out there in the wild, being sold for a buck at some garage sale.

I'll buy the bottom half of a shattered pole, and find a top half for it. With a bit of southern ingenuity, you could be building the rod you want from people's castaways. I brought in a 4 lb. bass just a couple of days ago with an old Shakespeare grafted to a zebco top. I like that combo. I call them ShakesZebs. Spincast rods (in my experience) usually don't run that long. I think the longest complete rod I have here for spincast is 6'6". If you wanna move past that barrier maybe a spinning rod? Also nothing is stopping you from modifying a spinning rod and slapping a spincast reel on there. If you need any advice on DIY'ing up some rods, feel free to PM me, or pop into the discord where everyone groans at my spincast poo poo (they're actually all very cool and helpful).

Shakespeare Wonder Rods from the 70s and 80s run 7' and up and I see them go on eBay, etc, for 10-20 dollars. Eagle Claw also made some absolutely dope glass rods back in the day that go for pretty cheap. eBay it up!

Edit: I went and re-read. You were looking for a spinning rod. God dammit this always happens. No one has any love for the spincast.

Untrustable fucked around with this message at 10:23 on Jul 19, 2020

King of Bees
Dec 28, 2012


Gravy Boat 2k

Just replacing 4 eyes on one of my surf rods. Two had lost the plastic inserts and the other two had inserts that were loose. Something had a sharp edge and had wore down the 20lb braid in God knows how many spots which cost me a rig before I even realized what happened. Of course that means I'll be respooling the reel as soon as I'm done with these eyes. It was newish line too, a lot of it.

gay picnic defence
Oct 5, 2009

"Let there be a thousand blossoms bloom, as far as I'm concerned."



Cool, a dickspoon thread. This place really does cater for every niche and I'm glad it looks like the forums will continue.







Would it be possible to make a cursed dick dickspoon? I'm thinking the right angle bend could be incorporated as a bib to give it some action.

Fastball LIVE in concert
Jul 10, 2010


I was just fishing up north this weekend. I really wish I had seen the information about baitcaster reels before I had bought mine as the first day of shore fishing was an exercise in frustration. The second day on the boat was good, and i caught 4 walleye and 2 northern pike, but lost so much line that I wound up completely respooling the reel on the middle of a choppy rear end lake.

Ghostnuke
Sep 21, 2005

Throw this in a pot, add some broth, a potato? Baby you got a stew going!




gay picnic defence posted:

Cool, a dickspoon thread. This place really does cater for every niche and I'm glad it looks like the forums will continue.







Would it be possible to make a cursed dick dickspoon? I'm thinking the right angle bend could be incorporated as a bib to give it some action.

Iymarra
Oct 4, 2010





Survived AGDQ 2018 Awful Games block!

Grimey Drawer

Just a quick thank-you to fishgoons for helping me get my first ever reel spooled up with line.

From this empty reel

To this near full one, ready to go

Jump King
Aug 10, 2011



now go out and ruin a fish's day

Dik Hz
Feb 22, 2004

Fun with Science



As the previous OP, I support this post. And I've already ordered my dickspoons.

prom candy
Dec 16, 2005

Only I may dance

here's a fish i caught once



i hope to catch another one soon

King of Bees
Dec 28, 2012


Gravy Boat 2k

I wanna tie some insanely ornate classic wet flies.

Gooch181
Jan 1, 2008

The Gooch

Those are awesome. (I also bet they slay fish)

edit: I finally got around to reading Dangerllama's effortpost on fly fishing; that is fantastic! If anyone thinks fly fishing looks like it might be for them, there are some cheapo starter sets that while not fancy, will absolutely give you enough of a taste to decide if you want to get into it or not. There's something extremely meditative about tending your line and stripping it in. Feeling the fish bite with the line in your hand is addicting as gently caress.

Gooch181 fucked around with this message at 22:43 on Jul 20, 2020

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Dik Hz
Feb 22, 2004

Fun with Science



Gooch181 posted:

Those are awesome. (I also bet they slay fish)

edit: I finally got around to reading Dangerllama's effortpost on fly fishing; that is fantastic! If anyone thinks fly fishing looks like it might be for them, there are some cheapo starter sets that while not fancy, will absolutely give you enough of a taste to decide if you want to get into it or not. There's something extremely meditative about tending your line and stripping it in. Feeling the fish bite with the line in your hand is addicting as gently caress.
https://www.amazon.com/Feather-Thief-Obsession-Natural-History/dp/110198161X

So, those old fly patterns are completely ineffective compared to your basic wooly bugger, and purely designed to show off the status of the fly-tier. I linked an interesting non-fiction book about a guy investigating a theft of really old extinct bird feathers from a natural history museum. It's a quick read and I recommend it. Not exactly high literature, and the author is reaching a bit, but I can't fault him for how interesting the world he opens up is. It's tragically hilarious that the author served in Iraq with USAID and spends most of his journalistic career trying to help his former Iraqi colleagues. But he gets a best-seller for writing about a super-niche corner of fly-fishing and a bizarre heist that he only stumbled over for volunteering to help injured veterans learn to fly fish.

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