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Beet Wagon
Oct 19, 2015









Welcome goons. Please be advised you are entering an extremely chill zone. There might be some overlap with the Camping Gear Megathread but hopefully this can be a hammock specific thread. Hammocks are neat. They're useful for everything from camping to hanging around to avoiding work. One of the best things about hammocks is that they can be set up anywhere you've got two very solid anchor points (more on this later). You can hang them between two trees and sleep overnight (duh) or between two pieces of construction equipment and have a nap on your lunch break (and probably be killed by your coworkers)! Hammocks come in about a million different styles and constructions, but they can all basically be broken down into two types: gathered-end hammocks and spread hammocks.

Flat Hammocks

I don't know what the technical name for these is, but they typically are either of canvas or rope mesh construction, and they usually have some kind of solid wood or plastic bar at either end to help spread them out and help them lay flat. They're actually pretty comfy for short periods, assuming they don't instantly kill you. The problem with these things is that the spread bar thing is a good idea but the lines all join up in the middle, meaning that the hammock is sort of a big wide flat thing that rotates around that point. It's entirely possible that your parents or grandparents had one, and if they did, it's entirely possible that this happened to them (or you) when they tried to get into it:

These hammocks are notoriously, hilariously easy to flip over. They also don't really travel well, so most of the time when you hear someone talking about a hammock these days, they're talking about a gathered-end hammock. Unless it's your grandpa, then he's probably talking about one of these. I honestly don't know much about these kinds of hammocks other than how to fall out of them a lot, and I don't ever really see them anywhere, so I'm going to leave it at that, but if you have cool stories or recommendations about these, let me hear 'em!

Gathered-end Hammock

These hammocks tend to be more portable and are often the basis for camping hammocks and the like. The ends are gathered together and either heatwelded into one solid piece or tied up so the entire thing forms kind of a pocket. They're actually really stable and easy to get into and out of. Gathered-end hammocks have become wildly popular lately, and can be had from basically any retail or sporting goods store for less than $50 dollars. There's a gazillion and one companies selling them right now, mainly because they're easy to source and sell on places like Amazon. One of the bigger manufacturers you've possibly heard of is Eagle's Nest Outfitters (or ENO for short) and while it's true that they make fine hammocks, there's a million and one other companies that will sell you hammocks for less money - and there's a very real chance they were manufactured in the same factory! There's also tons of cottage vendors who hand-make their hammocks, who you can (and should) decide to support if you want! You can even get materials and make your own!

Camping hammocks

Camping hammocks are usually gathered-end hammocks and typically come with some kind of included bug net and rain fly. There's some popular vendors out there, like Dutchware, Arrowhead Equipment, Hennessy Hammocks, and Warbonnet Outdoors, but you can also just buy a hammock, a bug net, and a rain fly and put together your own kit. Some of the bigger 'name brand' camping hammocks come with dozens of different features ranging from a little ridgeline storage pouch on the one pictured above to a full half-dome enclosure that looks more like a tent than a hammock. Often, they'll have features like a footbox designed to help you achieve a flat "diagonal" lay across the hammock, making it easier to sleep. They also can be fiddled with or customized to a pretty serious degree. That hammock above is my personal camping hammock, a Hennessy that I bought, immediately decided I didn't need half the features of, and started replacing poo poo on. Some say I'm still replacing things on that hammock to this day (that's not a knock against Hennessy, it's a fine - if overpriced - lightweight setup, I just didn't need it to be that lightweight and I like to fiddle). Camping hammocks can be a really fun well to fall down, especially if you're trying to go as lightweight as possible. Hammocks come in different material thicknesses, lengths, widths, weights, colors, and shapes, and there's approximately 400 million different suspension systems to choose between whether you're starting from scratch or replacing an existing suspension. I won't list them all here because honestly there's way too many and I still use the big loop straps with carabiners like a total nerd baby.

A Note on Suspensions and Mounting Points!
Please, please, please if you're ever going to hang a hammock, make sure you're hanging from somewhere that can support you. Hammocks actually put a significant lateral load on the things they're strapped to, which can be dangerous. People have been killed as a result of attempting to hang a hammock from something that then collapsed on them, and you should try to not be one of them! Hang from trees or from mounting points that you can guarantee will not pull something heavy down on to your dome.

Hammock Resources:

This OP is in no way a complete collection of hammock knowledge, so feel free to add tips and tricks if you've got 'em, or good sites I missed in the resources list. Do you have a hammock and fiddle with it endlessly? Do you want a hammock but have questions? This is the thread for you!

CopperHound posted:

I'm a fukin' broken record here. Integrate the ridge line with your hammock. Pack the hammock with the bug net on it.

e: can we put this image in OP please?

Beet Wagon fucked around with this message at 18:52 on Aug 13, 2020

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Safety Dance
Sep 10, 2007

Five degrees to starboard!


Hell yeah a hammock thread! I've owned a hammock and suspension for years. I keep telling myself I'm going to set it up one of these days, but I haven't found the perfect opportunity yet.

Happiness Commando
Feb 1, 2002
$$ joy at gunpoint $$



I have a Warbonnet system that I take backpacking. It's great.

Beet Wagon
Oct 19, 2015







Safety Dance posted:

Hell yeah a hammock thread! I've owned a hammock and suspension for years. I keep telling myself I'm going to set it up one of these days, but I haven't found the perfect opportunity yet.

Hell yeah, any time's a good time for hammocks imo.


Happiness Commando posted:

I have a Warbonnet system that I take backpacking. It's great.

I want to get a warbonnet really bad, they're the ones with the big foot box right? I switched to hammock camping a while ago and I don't think I could ever sleep in a tent again, honestly.

Happiness Commando
Feb 1, 2002
$$ joy at gunpoint $$



Beet Wagon posted:


I want to get a warbonnet really bad, they're the ones with the big foot box right?
Yup! Right sided (left sided? Head left feet right) asymmetric lay with a big ol foot box. After my thru hike I didn't have a bed and I bought the hangers to hang a hammock inside, but bedroom geometry made it unworkable. I still have them. Someday...

PokeJoe
Aug 24, 2004

hail cgatan




I use y hammock all the time. I just picked up an underquilt for it so I can use it for more of the year.

Beet Wagon
Oct 19, 2015







Happiness Commando posted:

Yup! Right sided (left sided? Head left feet right) asymmetric lay with a big ol foot box. After my thru hike I didn't have a bed and I bought the hangers to hang a hammock inside, but bedroom geometry made it unworkable. I still have them. Someday...

Nice. How do you like it? My Hennessy is supposed to be asymmetric to help for a flatter lay, but honestly I've been eyeing the ones with actual footboxes with some envy lately cause mine just has some kinda... extra room that pulls out to the side. I can't remember which but there was also a brand that had some kind of built in shelf for putting small poo poo like shoes on and I'm super into that.

pantslesswithwolves
Oct 27, 2008

Ba-dam ba-DUMMMMMM


Dammit! I was working on the OP of a hammock thread but you beat me to it. So not chill, dude. So not chill.

Real talk this is a great OP and I look forward to hanging out here. Hereís me in my Eno Sub7, hanging out on the banks of the Potomac about 10 miles outside of DC along the C&O.


https://imgur.com/a/5R25IW5

Happiness Commando
Feb 1, 2002
$$ joy at gunpoint $$



Well, I'm really bummed that my next thru hike I'll be sleeping on the ground like a pleb, on account of there being less trees. But it's great. It comes with a bishop bag, it's stood up to about 1500 miles of backpacking and a few car camping nights. I use whoopie slings which are super convenient. There's a cool hack I saw someone had where they used fiberglass tent poles to tension their tarp way out for interior roominess, but thats a tarp hack, not a hammock hack. I have the Blackbird which does have a pocket (which they call a shelf, but it's right by your head and it's definitely more like a pocket), which I used for my phone and other sundries, but they have other models without. Integral bug net, integral ridgeline, it's pretty awesome. The nights when I wasn't sleeping comfortably was when I had a lovely hang on account of insufficient tree selection. When I had a variety to choose from, I very rarely had anything other than a great night of sleep.

I could definitely get a lighter setup, but my base weight was around 13 pounds with this and a 20 degree UQ and 10 degree TQ, so I'm not stressing about it too much. But I am eyeing a DCF tarp.

Hadlock
Nov 9, 2004





If you're looking to hang a hammock, you want to buy this stuff, of something very similar to it. It's ultra low stretch. The problem with paracord, etc is that it will stretch 4-5%, which over 20 feet your butt is scraping the ground.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01N5F72YW/



It is off-brand dyneema, or generically, UHMWPE, the stuff they use to replace steel cable in cranes these days. It's cool stuff. It stretches by about 1% and is highly UV resistant. If you wanted to get stupid and go ultra lightweight backpacking gear stuff, you could get this, but good luck keeping it untangled

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07RTNY6G4/

The 4mm stuff is really nice, as it is hollow braided, it lets you do stuff like add brummel locking splices etc rather than tying knots.

Things you should not hang a hammock with, for distances greater than 15 feet:

Nylon (stretches by 25% when it gets wet)
Polypropylene (stretches by 5%, dry or wet)
Paracord (see above)

Also, you should learn the alpine butterfly knot, so you can add a couple of convenient loops to your hanging gear. The big plus on an alpine butterfly knot, is that it won't change size, you can put it anywhere on a line, and it won't pull tight like a slipknot under load. It's also 100% easier to learn than a bowline knot.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n2aRj8dQPRQ#t=24s

neongrey
Feb 28, 2007

Plaguing your posts with incidental music.


I sleep in a hammock every day at home (with a hammock stand I got at amazon) and it's seriously one of the best things I've ever done. My back problems vanished literally overnight.

Stanky Bean
Dec 30, 2004



Oh hey hammock thread. I went and hiked up in the mountains the other weekend and hung out in this thing.



it was nice but I eventually had to put that jacket there under my butt as the wind was making it chilly

Elmnt80
Dec 30, 2012

OH NOOOO!





How are hammocks in hot swampy places like florida? I have a friend who wants to do more camping trips and keeps talking me into coming along. I've done the tent bit and can honestly sleep right on the ground with my head on a root if it comes down to it, but I do have to say a camping hammock seems like the A+ way to do it if it allows enough airflow to not drown in your own sweat at night.

Would using the roof rack of a vehicle be enough support for one end of a hammock? You're talking about something designed to stand up to hundreds of pounds of dynamic force like having a roof box on a car going down the highway. My brain says it should work, but I'd like to hear from someone else who has done it before I wind up killing or maiming myself in a new and interesting way.

Safety Dance
Sep 10, 2007

Five degrees to starboard!


Elmnt80 posted:

How are hammocks in hot swampy places like florida? I have a friend who wants to do more camping trips and keeps talking me into coming along. I've done the tent bit and can honestly sleep right on the ground with my head on a root if it comes down to it, but I do have to say a camping hammock seems like the A+ way to do it if it allows enough airflow to not drown in your own sweat at night.

Would using the roof rack of a vehicle be enough support for one end of a hammock? You're talking about something designed to stand up to hundreds of pounds of dynamic force like having a roof box on a car going down the highway. My brain says it should work, but I'd like to hear from someone else who has done it before I wind up killing or maiming myself in a new and interesting way.


I'm curious about this too. I go camping most years (not this year) in South Carolina in September. I think a hammock + bug net + rain fly would be cooler and allow more airflow than a tent+rain fly, and I'd be less susceptible to surprise rain storms.

I don't know if I'd trust a vehicle roof rack. Maybe something that came from the factory, but not one of those that clamps onto your rain gutters. If your hammock is suspended too tight, an adult could wind up exerting 1000+ lbs on the anchor. https://theultimatehang.com/hammock-hang-calculator/

PokeJoe
Aug 24, 2004

hail cgatan




A friend of mine has some hammock stands you drive on top of and then hang parallel with the vehicle. You could hang a person on either side that way

Beet Wagon
Oct 19, 2015







Elmnt80 posted:

How are hammocks in hot swampy places like florida? I have a friend who wants to do more camping trips and keeps talking me into coming along. I've done the tent bit and can honestly sleep right on the ground with my head on a root if it comes down to it, but I do have to say a camping hammock seems like the A+ way to do it if it allows enough airflow to not drown in your own sweat at night.

Would using the roof rack of a vehicle be enough support for one end of a hammock? You're talking about something designed to stand up to hundreds of pounds of dynamic force like having a roof box on a car going down the highway. My brain says it should work, but I'd like to hear from someone else who has done it before I wind up killing or maiming myself in a new and interesting way.

Hammocks are absolutely clutch for Florida camping. In fact honestly the airflow is so good that I sometimes have to throw an underquilt on mine cause I legit get cold. I make sure to treat mine with boatloads of Permethrin, because mine's only a single layer of fabric and is very susceptible to mosquitoes, but you can buy double thickness ones that are supposedly mosquito proof (IDK though our mosquitos can get pretty loving big).

As far as hanging from a car goes, it can definitely be done. I've hung my hammock from the roof rack of a Subaru Outback a couple times. You just have to be real sure that your roof rack or whatever you're attaching your hammock to is mounted well. A hammock is going to create a dynamic load easily capable of spiking to 2x your bodyweight but it's also going to apply that force in a direction your rack might not be designed to take it from if that makes sense.

e: out of curiosity I went to look up the weight limit of my roof rack and it is 165 lbs lol. And that's meant to be spread across two bars and pushing mostly down, not spread across one and pulling sideways. But I've done it twice and it worked okay, so I guess the moral of the story is "You can but you probably shouldn't."

Beet Wagon fucked around with this message at 18:07 on Jul 19, 2020

Clayton Bigsby
Apr 17, 2005



Beet Wagon posted:

A Note on Suspensions and Mounting Points!
Please, please, please if you're ever going to hang a hammock, make sure you're hanging from somewhere that can support you. Hammocks actually put a significant lateral load on the things they're strapped to, which can be dangerous. People have been killed as a result of attempting to hang a hammock from something that then collapsed on them, and you should try to not be one of them! Hang from trees or from mounting points that you can guarantee will not pull something heavy down on to your dome.


Couple additional comments on this.

Not only should you ensure that whatever you are hanging from isn't going to collapse on you, but that you eye the trees to make sure you don't hang below a big dead branch which might come crashing down on your rear end in the middle of the night if the wind blows a bit.

Also, make sure to use some sort of tree hugger since ropes will dig into the bark and damage the tree. I use some cargo straps (rated at several hundred kg load, cheap as hell at the car parts store) that I cut off and use with a "toggle" (in my case a cut off piece of copper pipe) to hang the hammock suspension from.

Here's my standard setup:


Hennessy Expedition Asym Zip, with a Snugpak underblanket (used a DD for a while but this hammock is pretty wide so you had to get it exactly right to avoid chills, the Snugpak is a fair bit wider) and top quilt. Using the tarp that came with it, and have found it sufficient even in pretty lousy weather. When it blows and rains a fair bit you have to try and get the tarp tucked in as close to the hammock as you can without it actually touching (since then water will wick through rapidly, something I learned one night at 3am).

I also have a couple of other setups but this is the main one. Though the little Exped gets used a lot for day trips, made some whoopie slings for it so the entire setup is super practical and light. Can throw it up in about a minute and get some good hang time when taking a break. If you haven't tried whoopie slings give them a go. Fun little project and you'll be amazed at how useful they are!

I camp in Sweden so there's virtually no scenario where I can not use some form of insulation. I envy the guys who can go without underblankets since it saves a bunch of space and weight.

Shibawanko
Feb 13, 2013



not really hammock related but ive recently taken to sleeping outside every night (put a bed in a half open shed type of building in my garden, hung a mosquito net) and it kicks rear end, i sleep way better and i had a hedgehog hiding under my bed one night, he scampered off making grunting noises when he noticed me

pantslesswithwolves
Oct 27, 2008

Ba-dam ba-DUMMMMMM


Iím gonna speak a bit about my experience using Eagleís Nest Outfitters (more commonly known as ďEnoĒ) stuff. Many people enter the lifestyle given how many retailers sell them and that they have a large share of the market thanks to good advertising and marketing. While I recognize that there are many enthusiasts who would argue that there are several manufacturers who make better hammocks, most people may buy one hammock and set of straps and be done with it, and itís pretty likely that hammock and straps will come from Eno. I would love to get a Warbonnet hammock some day, but for now, Iím pretty happy with how my Eno gear has treated me over the years.

I got my first hammock- an Eno DoubleNest- in mid-2014 on a whim while buying supplies for another camping trip. Since then, Iíve added several more hammocks, accessories and accompanying suspension systems, with my primary uses ranging from ďchill hangs with friendsĒ to ďthree season car campingĒ to ďultralight bikepacking.Ē

Hereís some of the stuff Iíve done with mine:



Enoís Fuse system allows you to hang two hammocks from a single set of anchor points by use of spreader bars. My wife and I frequently hold ďhammock happy hoursĒ wherein weíll set up two of my hammocks side by side and enjoy lounging with a few drinks around sunset in a park near our home.



A few weeks ago, I found a good spot in another park where I could hang up a bunch of hammocks in a triangle. We were able to accommodate four other friends in a socially distant hang, which is definitely something Iíd do again. Pictured here are my Sub7 ultralight, Singlenest, and two Doublenests.

Using a hammock for car camping can also be awesome. If youíre at a spot where you donít need a bug net and thereís no chance of rain, you can be nearly 100% set up in the time that it takes for your buddies to fish out their tent poles.



This is at Raystown Lake, Pennsylvania, which hosted Dirt Rag magazineís awesome mountain biking festival Dirt Fest until it went belly-up earlier this year. The waterfront sites are beautiful and lovely, but itís next to impossible to find flat ground on them. Hammocks to the rescue! All my buddy and I needed was to find a few trees and we didnít have to worry about sliding all over the place in our sleep. Here Iím using a Singlenest, ProFly tarp, and Guardian bug net.



This was one of the most sublime camping experiences Iíve had. Dirt Rag also hosted another Dirt Fest in Big Bear, West Virginia. Stepping a few feet into the woods, you had so many great options in perfectly mild, dry and bug-free conditions, perched among the teens in a beautiful forest. Just pitched my Singlenest and I was hanging in style.



I wasn't the only one who had this idea.



I took this long exposure of the Milky Way from my hammock as well.

Iíve also used my hammocks for bikepacking. My Sub7 hammock and ProFly Sil weigh in at roughly 24 oz, which is lighter than my Big Agnes Fly Creek UL2. Unfortunately, any weight or space savings I might have had would be negated by having to also pack my Vesta top quilt, and on colder nights, my Vulcan underquilt. The Vesta has come with me on every trip Iíve done; Iíve used the Vulcan in temps just below freezing and stayed warm despite it being rated to around 40 degrees Fahrenheit.



This was from a bikepacking trip last year that began under rainy, foggy and grossly damp conditions. My buddy poached the trees that were more optimally spaced so my set-up was a little janky on account of having to jerry-rig a ridge line and strap extensions with some 550 cord. Iím also using here the Underbelly gear sling, which hung underneath my hammock and did a great job of keeping stuff off the muddy ground. This is something I wouldnít have otherwise purchased, but I had a gift card from REI and Iím glad I did. Another friend carried my other tarp, and we used it to make a relatively dry communal hangout area where we could enjoy burritos and beers in comfort.



This is the newest addition to the family- a Skylite hammock with integrated bug net. Itís also wider than other hammocks thanks to the spreader bar system, which could prove to be a boon for side sleepers who are otherwise uncomfortable in hammocks.



I havenít had a chance to camp in this one, although Iím looking to rectify that this upcoming weekend. Initial impressions suggest that itís definitely roomier than Enoís other hammocks, and I appreciate the interior pockets and ridge line.

So there you have it- Eno may not be the all-time best manufacturer, but for most people, theyíre great for a variety of uses. There have been times when I felt like I would have benefitted from a more specialized hammock, but Iíve certainly never had a bad experience in any of my Enos.

p.s. I wrote a draft of this post while hanging in a hammock.

Sharks Eat Bear
Dec 25, 2004

Ain't got half a what you thought you had

Iím a side and stomach sleeper, which makes anything but the most luxurious sleeping pad quite uncomfortable and is my only gripe about sleeping on the ground. Howís a hammock for a side/stomach sleeper? Iíd imagine ok for side but no-go for stomach?

Happiness Commando
Feb 1, 2002
$$ joy at gunpoint $$



I'm a side sleeper most of the time, and a back sleeper on occasion when on a mattress. Side sleeping in my Warbonnet Blackbird mostly sucks. I can do it, but I'll wake up sore. Sometimes if I can't find the right trees and have a suboptimal hang, side sleeping just helps me fall asleep, and I'll wake up in the middle of the night and shift to my back and still be a little sore in the morning.

HOWEVER.

With the right tree selection and a decent hang, I sleep on my back in my hammock. I sleep all the way through the night. I don't toss, I don't turn, I wake up feeling physically and mentally great. I heartily endorse giving it a try. I can't say anything about stomach sleeping, though. And there's definitely a psychological adjustment to trying to fall asleep in a position other than your standard sleeping position. I recommend several day backpacking trips going until you're exhausted each day for a crash course in modifying sleep postures

Happiness Commando fucked around with this message at 21:50 on Jul 19, 2020

CopperHound
Feb 14, 2012



I made a very detailed post 3 years ago that includes everything I knew about hammocks.

CopperHound posted:

How to make a hammock:
1.)Find a loving table cloth: http://www.tableclothsfactory.com/tablecloths-Table-Linens-Chair-Covers-Sashes-s/132.htm
2.)Lash the ends http://www.tothewoods.net/HomemadeHammock2.html or just gather it and tie a sheet bend with your loving suspension: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AJlEQpcbM1I
3.)Hang the hammock and don't you dare use loving rope on a tree in a public park and ruin it for the rest of us: https://theultimatehang.com/2012/07/hammock-camping-101/

Congratulations. You just made an ENO hammock for less than 1/3 the price.
Now my hammock is two layers so I can slide a pad in there to keep my rear end warm. I don't use an underquilt because I like being ready to sleep on the ground. Also I use a ridge line. Ridge lines are good. If you have trouble getting your lay angle just right each time you put up a hammock, you also need a ridge line.

Mzuri
Jun 5, 2004

Who's the boss?
Dudes is lost.
Don't think coz I'm iced out,
I'm cooled off.

I just spent 3 fantastic nights in a row my Amok Draumr XL, after having fought to love and lost against a range of off the shelf (e.g, DD) and custom (e.g. British Ultralight) hammocks over the years.

Nights got down to 5 degrees C and not a cold butt in sight - slept all night, one of them on my side.

Beet Wagon
Oct 19, 2015







Sharks Eat Bear posted:

Iím a side and stomach sleeper, which makes anything but the most luxurious sleeping pad quite uncomfortable and is my only gripe about sleeping on the ground. Howís a hammock for a side/stomach sleeper? Iíd imagine ok for side but no-go for stomach?

I'm a side/stomach sleeper for the most part (I guess it's bad for you? Anyway I've been trying to train myself to sleep on my back more) and it really really depends on how much poo poo you have in the hammock with you. You can totally pile up enough blankets and poo poo to make stomach sleeping work, and side-sleeping is generally fine (at least in my hennessy) but to be honest HC is right, if I manage to hang my hammock right I can sleep on my back no problem.

This thread is making me want to go camp out in the back yard lol. My trees are like 35 feet apart though so hanging a hammock from them is a hilarious nightmare.

Clayton Bigsby
Apr 17, 2005



Just remembered this morning that I had a piece of hammock gear sitting around this morning that I'd completely forgotten about for years. Bought a used Gamma UL (from hammocktent.com) and tried it out, but at that time I had an Exped Synmat UL 5 and the entire setup felt a bit too narrow and flimsy for me. I now have a Synmat 7 LW as well (which is 200x60cm) so got the hammock out of storage and set it up. Yup, quite a bit better.



Upside is you sleep very flat and it's really relaxing swinging slowly back and forth. And it's insanely light (I think around 500 grams).

Downside is that it's a bit weird getting in and out of, and even though I am only 5'10" it feels barely long enough. And you need a pretty big or special purpose tarp for it. The suspension system (tree huggers with dyneema/amsteel? attached) using descender rings is a bit fiddly. I think using the long cargo straps I have (which should fit the descender rings nicely) will be quicker and easier.

Will probably bring it on my next overnight trip instead of the Hennessy Expedition though, just to try it out.

Deeters
Aug 20, 2007



I want to get some sort of support so I can hang a hammock without trees if I go camping on my motorcycle. It would need to be compact enough to fit in a backpack or saddlebags. Something like this Tensa Solo set up seems like what I'm imagining, but $90 for one pole feels really steep. Any of you have better suggestions?

Clayton Bigsby
Apr 17, 2005



Deeters posted:

I want to get some sort of support so I can hang a hammock without trees if I go camping on my motorcycle. It would need to be compact enough to fit in a backpack or saddlebags. Something like this Tensa Solo set up seems like what I'm imagining, but $90 for one pole feels really steep. Any of you have better suggestions?

Have you considered just going to ground instead? Depends on what gear you are using, but you could setup e.g. a Hennessy pretty easily that way--anchor one end of the suspension to the ground and then maybe tie the other into your motorcycle (not to put weight on but just suspend the tarp basically, making a sort of hammock-bivy). If you're using an underblanket you could keep a soda can sized Exped UL 5 or similar in your pack for sleeping on when you're on the ground.

Just a thought, I personally would not want to gently caress around with getting those Solo poles anchored well enough to hang from. Seems way too fiddly and reliant on good soil to anchor the stuff to.

Hadlock
Nov 9, 2004





Some sort of self-stayed hammock stand that doesn't require guy lines or trees, and also weighs less than 15 lbs, and costs less than $100 is sort of the holy grail



Something like this, but instead of 1.5" OD steel tubing, if you scaled it up to 4" carbon fiber tubing, 5 x 48" sections, would make a sub-10 lb hammock stand, but the bundle of tubes would be pretty awkward to carry around, also probably cost close to $1000 to fab one

You might be able to get away with 2x carbon fiber hockey sticks and a bunch of guy lines and stakes, but even that is going to be $80 to start, unless you go digging around in the dumpster near your local hockey rink https://www.purehockey.com/product/warrior-alpha-team-grip-composite-shaft-senior/itm/39989-41/ at least it would be lighter than a telescoping pole. I dunno how that would work out mounted to a motorcycle though.

Best solution I've found is to buy a 300' spool of dyneema kite line for $12 and then find two trees less than 300' apart

highme
May 25, 2001


I posted my food for USPOL Thanksgiving!




Since my wife loves not camping, the first time I was exposed to hammocks for camping I was all in. I found some guy on CL that was selling his bugout bag for $150. It included a fuckoff huge REI pack, a Clark NX-270 (missing tarp, poles & half the underquilt), an ENO hammock, pop up bivy sack and some other poo poo. Since camping in that the first time it's my first choice if I'm going to be sleeping by myself. in the before times, I did a lot of buying/selling at Next Adventure in Portland I've also added another Clark hammock, another ENO (usually set those up as couches in campgrounds) and various other accessories. I still need a decent underquilt and should probably buy the real poles instead of the fiberglass things that I've made do with.

I ordered something like this off of an IG ad. The package took forever to arrive and was just an ENO style hammock. Paypal gave me all my money back and I ended up giving it to one of my son's friends, so it was fine. I just ordered one of the suspended tents from another IG ad, I hope it isn't the same result.


Oh yeah, I forgot to add, if you have a Safari or Astro van you're thinking about turning into a camper, an ENO hammock is a great way to add a place to sleep. Put one anchor on the driver's side third row seat belt and shut the front passenger door on the other end.

highme fucked around with this message at 22:12 on Jul 22, 2020

Deeters
Aug 20, 2007




Hadlock posted:

More good ideas

Thanks, I had a feeling that what I wanted didn't exist without spending a lot based on how few Google results there were. On the bike, my concern was more space than weight. But I don't do that much camping, so I'll probably just go with the ground idea Clayton said. I really just wanted a contingency for if I get to a more "improved" campsite that doesn't have trees right around it.

Ledhed
Feb 13, 2006
Doesn't believe in the letter a

YO, fuckiní hammock thread eh?

I got into it just in the last couple of years but have loved every minute of it. Got lucky finding some inexpensive second-hand gear, namely a warbonnet el dorado and warbonnet edge tarp. Unfortunately too hot right now to sleep outside comfortably for me, canít wait for the fall and cooler weather.

Yellow Jesus
Jul 18, 2003



Any of you know a lot about tarps? I've just been using a tarp that came with a cheapo aliexpress hammock and i'm wondering if there are any benefits from buying something fancier.


Mzuri posted:

I just spent 3 fantastic nights in a row my Amok Draumr XL, after having fought to love and lost against a range of off the shelf (e.g, DD) and custom (e.g. British Ultralight) hammocks over the years.

Nights got down to 5 degrees C and not a cold butt in sight - slept all night, one of them on my side.

Amok Draumr XL buddy! The only hammock i've actually gotten a good nights sleep in.

CopperHound
Feb 14, 2012



Yellow Jesus posted:

Any of you know a lot about tarps? I've just been using a tarp that came with a cheapo aliexpress hammock and i'm wondering if there are any benefits from buying something fancier.
I like packing a winter tarp:


It is a lot of extra fabric to carry around, but it is versatile enough for any sort of pitching I might want to do.

Snake skins make handling it much more manageable.
E: also usable for non hammock stuff.

CopperHound fucked around with this message at 18:25 on Jul 23, 2020

highme
May 25, 2001


I posted my food for USPOL Thanksgiving!




Since mine didn't come with a tarp, and that Clark hammock is too heavy to backpack with anyway, I bought a 12' Noah's Tarp from Kelty. Geartrade.com had both the 12ft & 16ft versions of that the other day when I was bored shopping. I almost bought the 16 just because.

BaseballPCHiker
Jan 16, 2006



Woohoo hammock thread!

I got a used Warbonnet XLC on GearTrade earlier in the year and have camped out it in a couple of times now. For trips where I dont have to worry about weight as much I am fully on board the hammock train.

Here is my setup with my wifes hammock from a trip earlier in the year:


Ive never slept better outdoors than I do in my hammock.

Also for people who want more hammock knowledge check out Shugs YouTube, he was very helpful to me when I was getting started:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLB8752777861C2AA8

Fart Car '97
Jul 23, 2003

o fuk traffic

Posting from hammock:



This month marks the Ten Year anniversary of purchasing my ENO Doublenest as a travel/camp hammock. I slept in it during the hot season for the entirety of my Peace Corps service and it's one of the few things in my life I've kept no matter where I've gone.

CopperHound
Feb 14, 2012



I'm surprised how few pictures I see with structural ridge lines. I cannot sleep unless I get the hammock sag angle just right.

Looten Plunder
Jul 11, 2006


Grimey Drawer

All of these setups look so awesome, then I remembered I have a terrible back and feel like I'd die if I actually tried to sleep in one of these overnight.

That and the fact I'm a terrible snorer (especially on my back) so I'd probably wake all the wildlife (and anyone I'm with) up.

CopperHound
Feb 14, 2012



You never know until you try.

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neongrey
Feb 28, 2007

Plaguing your posts with incidental music.


legit, sleeping in a hammock has done wonders for my back, and I just use a hammock stand I got on Amazon in my bedroom

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