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CopperHound
Feb 14, 2012



kimbo305 posted:

Seeing that makes me want to consider updating to 46 or 50t. Just in case.
I don't know about you, but I think I'd have to shift down to my 40t chainring to make it up that hill

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kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



CopperHound posted:

I don't know about you, but I think I'd have to shift down to my 40t chainring to make it up that hill

<> oh yeah, what front ring.

spf3million
Sep 27, 2007

hit 'em with the rhythm

rope kid posted:

EDIT: gently caress, that desert ramble route. The elevation cyclist has logged on.


60' per mile isn't outrageous for bike packing (unpaved) routes is it?

rope kid
Feb 3, 2001

Warte nur! Balde
Ruhest du auch.


Yeah after I looked at the total distance it seems less wild.

Bottom Liner
Feb 15, 2006


IF I'M TALKING ABOUT ART, I'M PROBABLY WRONG, SO PLEASE REPORT ME SO I CAN BE PROBATED. AGAIN.




nah that's not too bad. 100/mi is when you start getting into hellish territory. All the TN/GA mountains are well over that and it's brutal after a few days of riding all day.

rope kid
Feb 3, 2001

Warte nur! Balde
Ruhest du auch.


For my Romeo build, I'm using 26" wheels with Rat Trap Passes as the main tires. What would be some good knobby tires for bikepacking in muddy conditions?

When I did Tour de Chequamegon a couple of years ago my slick 650b 42mm Babyshoe Pass tires floated over a lot of stuff but they absolutely sucked if I was in any significant amount of mud. I know of a lot of 650b options for that bike but I'm not that familiar with touring-oriented 26" knobbies/semi-knobbies.

kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



What's the max tire clearance? You think you could fit 2.5?
https://surlybikes.com/parts/extraterrestrial
These are still on the fast rolling end, but they're supposed to be excellent at shedding mud. Have not ridden them in the mud, but decently fast on the road.

The Wiggly Wizard
Aug 21, 2008




rope kid posted:

For my Romeo build, I'm using 26" wheels with Rat Trap Passes as the main tires. What would be some good knobby tires for bikepacking in muddy conditions?

When I did Tour de Chequamegon a couple of years ago my slick 650b 42mm Babyshoe Pass tires floated over a lot of stuff but they absolutely sucked if I was in any significant amount of mud. I know of a lot of 650b options for that bike but I'm not that familiar with touring-oriented 26" knobbies/semi-knobbies.

Are you going tubeless? Thunder Burts are popular- they would give you a little bite but still roll pretty well. I have Ikons on my off road wheelset and while I haven't used them in a while the sidewalls have survived a lot of pokes. If you want a true mountain tire then you might ask that thread.

Not even sure if they make them in 26" but avoid tanwalls for bikepacking. You need that rubber on the sidewalls.

rope kid
Feb 3, 2001

Warte nur! Balde
Ruhest du auch.


kimbo305 posted:

What's the max tire clearance? You think you could fit 2.5?
https://surlybikes.com/parts/extraterrestrial
These are still on the fast rolling end, but they're supposed to be excellent at shedding mud. Have not ridden them in the mud, but decently fast on the road.
Max clearance without fenders should be 2.5"... I'm still undecided if I'm going to install the huge Velo Orange wavy fenders or not. I think for a bikepacking bike I'd rather just go without. Thanks for the rec.

The Wiggly Wizard posted:

Are you going tubeless? Thunder Burts are popular- they would give you a little bite but still roll pretty well. I have Ikons on my off road wheelset and while I haven't used them in a while the sidewalls have survived a lot of pokes. If you want a true mountain tire then you might ask that thread.

Not even sure if they make them in 26" but avoid tanwalls for bikepacking. You need that rubber on the sidewalls.
I think I'm going tubeless but this will be my first tubeless setup. Is changing tires a hassle with tubeless?

The RTPs have tan sidewalls.

(not mine)

spf3million
Sep 27, 2007

hit 'em with the rhythm

Gravelking SK+ 26x2.1?

CopperHound
Feb 14, 2012



I have 26x2.5" extra terrestrial tires on my troll. I'm a bit of a tire snob and they are about the limit of what I would put up in terms of tire stiffness. I highly recommend them if you are looking for an expedition tire, but since you were using rat trap passes, I imagine you might want something more... supple for shorter trips.

rope kid posted:

I think I'm going tubeless but this will be my first tubeless setup. Is changing tires a hassle with tubeless?
Yes, but it is worth it.

E: In case you are looking for some point of reference, The ETs rolled so much nicer than the marathon mondial tires I had originally put on the bike.

CopperHound fucked around with this message at 01:24 on Jul 28, 2020

kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



Clearing out my phone and found a pic of the box with all my gear, labeled for TSA convenience.

I think next time, I might try to get everything onto the flight.

Bottom Liner
Feb 15, 2006


IF I'M TALKING ABOUT ART, I'M PROBABLY WRONG, SO PLEASE REPORT ME SO I CAN BE PROBATED. AGAIN.




is that iso fuel? didn't think you could even check that

kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



Bottom Liner posted:

is that iso fuel? didn't think you could even check that

Nothing that looks round is a fuel canister.
The most round thing is just a water bottle (with stuff inside; I didn't waste space!).

i say swears online
Mar 4, 2005

medio de fonte leporum surgo amariter




my people

if i had gotten furloughed in march like i wanted, i'd be a hobo right now

i rode from austin to san salvador in 2013-4 and it was very fun and cool and i almost died about four times, more if you count dengue, surgery, and cartels

my route, roughly:



1983 trek 520, no drop bars, road gearing. i walked my bike up about 100 miles of hills lol



posting for leftist rep, i lived on a commune for a week and it was great



i stayed with a baker in matehuala. we traded recipes; he taught me tres leches and here he is showing off his very first apple pie



in clonclusion: go be a bike hobo you're probably not gonna regret it unless you die

Bottom Liner
Feb 15, 2006


IF I'M TALKING ABOUT ART, I'M PROBABLY WRONG, SO PLEASE REPORT ME SO I CAN BE PROBATED. AGAIN.




i say swears online posted:

i almost died about four times, more if you count dengue, surgery, and cartels


well this demands a story time


goddamn

Coxswain Balls
Jun 3, 2001



That's incredibly awesome.

SimonSays
Aug 4, 2006

Simon is the monkey's name

Well I just got back from tour myself! I biked up from Montreal along the Route Verte for a day and a half, then crossed over to the Gatineau River valley and headed down near Ottawa via my home mountain roads. The last leg was a return to Montreal via rural Ontario and the Ottawa River.

660km altogether over five days. I usually tour in the autumn and I was amazed by how many daylight hours of cycling there are in the high summer!

I picked wild raspberries and ate my favourite Dutch-oven baked beans in Kazabazua, found great dirt roads and beautiful places to hang my hammock to sleep along the long cycling trails.

The Route Verte is superb in many parts, many rest areas and water all along in every town (and sometimes mountain springs), I highly recommend it. The Gatineau River trails are a bit more simple, without water fountains and with crummy loose gravel in places but with varied and beautiful terrain. I rode maybe 75km on the Prescott-Russel trail in Ontario and I'd avoid it in the future and just use the country roads, it's badly finished and incredibly boring with barely any amenities.

After 201km on the Route Verte


Some bits of my route were very nicely paved, some were beautiful lanes. Not pictured: lovely loose gravelly parts cause it was a slog.

SimonSays
Aug 4, 2006

Simon is the monkey's name

i say swears online posted:

my people

if i had gotten furloughed in march like i wanted, i'd be a hobo right now

i rode from austin to san salvador in 2013-4 and it was very fun and cool and i almost died about four times, more if you count dengue, surgery, and cartels


Love it! I admire those that have the spirit for the bike hobo experience.

kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



SimonSays posted:

660km altogether over five days. I usually tour in the autumn and I was amazed by how many daylight hours of cycling there are in the high summer!

I've only wild camped once, but it'd be so tempting right now. If you're fresh in the deep afternoon, there's still 2-3 hours of riding left.

i say swears online
Mar 4, 2005

medio de fonte leporum surgo amariter




Bottom Liner posted:

well this demands a story time


goddamn

pick a spot on my map and i'll tell you something weird

coolest spots were the mountains in the chihuahua desert, matehuala, the huasteca, i had surgery in veracruz, working as a conman at a mezcal distillery in oaxaca, staying with a missionary/landlord in guatemala city, and living on a dairy farm in quetzaltquetepe el salvador for a month

i say swears online fucked around with this message at 08:08 on Aug 3, 2020

i say swears online
Mar 4, 2005

medio de fonte leporum surgo amariter





i've never been on a bike road and they always make me jealous. i'd love to do the eurovelo stuff someday

i say swears online
Mar 4, 2005

medio de fonte leporum surgo amariter




https://www.twitch.tv/hitch

my dude trevor is a hitchhiker who livestreams catching rides all around the world. covid destroyed both his livelihood and his ability to pursue his passion and instead he's headed across canada on bike. I use my free amazon prime sub on him and you should too, he's a good guy. he's live pretty much all north american daylight hours at the moment

God Hole
Mar 2, 2016


i posted this at the end of the old thread so I'm gonna go ahead and post it at the beginning of this new one!

i biked across the US with my friend Lucas in 2016. Lucas is an adventurer, ski instructor, climber, cyclist, and all-around cool dude. he also has one underdeveloped arm, which has done nothing to slow him down.

Lucas and two other physically challenged athletes are undergoing a challenge to start at the lowest altitude point of every continent and make it to the highest altitude point entirely by human power. so they'll be cycling, hiking, scrambling, and climbing their way all over the world for the foreseeable future. they already finished south america!

follow along

https://www.instagram.com/lowesthighest/



kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



Found the old pics of the template I used to have a frame bag made. I can't remember which company gave the basic instructions, but it's pretty intuitive -- label everything where a strap can't go:



Between pictures and having the template on hand, should be able to sew a bag to the right dimensions.

At this point, I was talking to an acquaintance who was trying her hand at making bikepacking equipment (her day job is a camping gear engineer), and I thought I would get more out of a custom bag. We thought of making a radical bulge out front to increase volume. I was confident my knees would clear it.

It worked -- fit was a little short toward the BB, but pretty drat good elsewhere.





I have a pretty small 3 season sleeping bag, and it fits nicely into the bulge.
I'll discuss that fork swap on my touring bike later.

CopperHound
Feb 14, 2012



Ugh... fine, I'll say it: Nice Bulge
Sewing 3d curves is not something I've managed to wrap my head around.
What are the loops at the end of the zippers for? Is there another slide that we can't see in the pictures?

kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



CopperHound posted:

What are the loops at the end of the zippers for? Is there another slide that we can't see in the pictures?

I think they're just meant to hold while you zip closed? Tbh, that's one of my annoyances with the bag, as they tickle my calf a bit if they're not perfectly tucked tight. You can see it in the top-down shot.

golden bells
Oct 17, 2013






I'm probably getting a Soma Saga frame to build up (with the outsized assistance of a friend), and I'm giddy. :3

i say swears online
Mar 4, 2005

medio de fonte leporum surgo amariter




my frame is almost 40 years old and rusty so i'm saving for a new one. i have good wheels and some other components. is there a reason not to look for a long haul trucker frame? my main purpose is touring but most of my time on the bike is neighborhood rides and i need at least a little agility. is the crosscheck the surly frame most comparable to a trek 520? is there another brand i should consider? $525 for a new frame seems reasonable for the LHT since i'll likely keep it for twenty years

nm
Jan 28, 2008

"I saw Minos the Space Judge holding a golden sceptre and passing sentence upon the Martians. There he presided, and around him the noble Space Prosecutors sought the firm justice of space law."

The closest frame to a trek 520 is an LHT.
I'd get the disc trucker though, disc are really much better and honestly in 20 years, if not now, easier to get and fix. I'd stick to cable v. hydro for touring.

I've always found light touring bikes too much of a compromise if you plan on typical 4 pannier fully loaded touring. My salsa vaya was a wobbly mess loaded. Watch out for surly's sizing, other than the LHT, they run very long and low, which is not really ideal for touring if you buy in size. A lot of really stupid bike stores cut surly steerers too short on the display floor and they never fit right. Surlys are supposed to have a huge stack of spacers, they literally market their forks as having steers that are strong enough to run any amount of spacers.

Somas can be good as well.

Comedy option if the rust is only surface rust is to get it stripped and powdercoated. I got my old trek done for $200 and that was with paying extra for bass boat purple v a simpler color.

i say swears online
Mar 4, 2005

medio de fonte leporum surgo amariter




thank you for that, it's informative! i didn't realize how big the 520 was; when i bought it, i thought it was a 720 which i guess is even bigger?? if a LHT handles like a 520 (assuming they haven't changed the geometry since '83) i'm good to go there; i feel pretty agile unloaded and it's very stable with four panniers



looks like some dork kept a u-lock strapped there for awhile. you said you got a strip and coat for $200? i thought it'd be closer to $400 and that changes things. the problem is that the rust seems like it's in a sensitive area of the frame. it has not progressed in the seven years i've owned it, i just want to be sure of myself if i go be a hobo again

spf3million
Sep 27, 2007

hit 'em with the rhythm

Having ridden both a LHT and a number of Treks of that vintage, I'll say the LHT will be much stiffer than the old Treks. Especially noticeable when unloaded. I used my LHT for years as a commuter and over time I came to realize it's not a great ride for around the town stuff. Sure it is capable but just not all that fun.

On the other hand LHTs will have room for much wider tires, more cage mounts, and the option for disc brakes which is really nice.

i say swears online
Mar 4, 2005

medio de fonte leporum surgo amariter




Yeah maybe I'm asking too much out of a frame. I really am happy with my current bike, I just wish it wasn't damaged

nm
Jan 28, 2008

"I saw Minos the Space Judge holding a golden sceptre and passing sentence upon the Martians. There he presided, and around him the noble Space Prosecutors sought the firm justice of space law."

One of our local bike manufacturer (Ventana in Rancho Cordova, CA) will do powdercoats for that. Powdercoats do limit you to certain colors. Wet paint will look better, particularly on lugged, but powdercoat will cost way less and at least protect the bike.
I would recommend sticking to people who do a lot of bikes as you want someone who can treat it well.
You can likely replace all the decals through velocals if you care about that.
If you have a metal headbadge, make sure you keep that or have the powdercoater take it off before stripping. I think a headbadge with some experience on a freshly painted vintage frame looks great.

I do think those old treks are totally worth saving.

edit: I got my powdercoat 4-5 years ago, so it might cost a touch more now.

CopperHound
Feb 14, 2012



i say swears online posted:

I really am happy with my current bike, I just wish it wasn't damaged
I can't be a great judge from a picture, but it just looks like surface rust to me.

If you go the powder coat route, get your frame faced before reassembly. You should do that anyway if you buy a bare surly frame because they leave thick powder coat everywhere.

CopperHound fucked around with this message at 17:53 on Aug 15, 2020

kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



Most of the traditional 4-pannier touring bike frames will use cheaper tubing thatís stiff and will only ride nicely with the extra load. I went with a Jamis Aurora Elite because it was sturdier than the LHT.

nm
Jan 28, 2008

"I saw Minos the Space Judge holding a golden sceptre and passing sentence upon the Martians. There he presided, and around him the noble Space Prosecutors sought the firm justice of space law."

^^^^^^
Even if it high end steel, it is generally going to be thicker and stiffer than a regular frame simply because of the necessary compromises to keep the bike from being a flexible flyer when loaded.

CopperHound posted:

I can't be a great judge from a picture, but it just looks like surface rust to me.

If you go the powder coat route, get your frame faced before reassembly. You should do that anyway if you buy a bare surly frame because they leave thick powder coat everywhere.

Q is so bad at QC. You should also make sure the frame straight.

A good bike powdercoater should face as a matter of course, but when you assume you make an rear end out of u and me.

The Wiggly Wizard
Aug 21, 2008




i say swears online posted:

my frame is almost 40 years old and rusty so i'm saving for a new one. i have good wheels and some other components. is there a reason not to look for a long haul trucker frame? my main purpose is touring but most of my time on the bike is neighborhood rides and i need at least a little agility. is the crosscheck the surly frame most comparable to a trek 520? is there another brand i should consider? $525 for a new frame seems reasonable for the LHT since i'll likely keep it for twenty years

Trek still makes a 520 model and a 520 disc now. Framesets and complete

i say swears online
Mar 4, 2005

medio de fonte leporum surgo amariter




if i get my old frame powder coated, do they blast off the old paint and rust or do i do that first? i don't care about the decals (or if so i'd order a new set) but i'd keep the headplate

The Wiggly Wizard posted:

Trek still makes a 520 model and a 520 disc now. Framesets and complete

weird, the framesets come with an aluminum fork. iunno how to feel about that or whether it matters all that much

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kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



i say swears online posted:

weird, the framesets come with an aluminum fork. iunno how to feel about that or whether it matters all that much

They do have engineers designing the things, and while aluminum forks might see more fatigue than aluminum frames, it should be good enough for however long Trek thinks youíll own it, which is a high bar for the 520.

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