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e.pilot
Nov 20, 2011

MR.FUSION
#TEAMTRASHMILES


So, you’ve been riding your bike a while, and after mile 15 you let your mind wander and start thinking… “How does this magical wonder-steed work?” But, that never really happens. Something usually feels off or something just stops working. And for those moments, you now have this thread. Use this as a resource for questions about undertaking any repairs yourself, or if you're having a problem with your bike.

Though most bike related repairs can be performed at home, be sure to research how to do something BEFORE YOU DO IT. Set aside plenty of time, make sure you have the tools and parts you need before undertaking a new project. Know that there's no substitute for an experienced hand and tutelage when it comes to Bicycle Repair, but hopefully this thread will be the next best thing.

If after posting in here, you don't feel comfortable working on your own bike, take it into an LBS or visit a local Bike Co-Op, ask them for advice and have them walk you through the process. While some of us are very experienced bike mechanics, without actually servicing your bike in person we can't insure that things are done safely and correctly, so when in doubt consult a professional.

As a general disclaimer, we assume no liability for you screwing things up and getting hurt as a result, if you're not sure, or you aren't convinced that something is done properly than just go to a bike shop and have a professional service your bike.

Tools

There are many tools that you can get “Bike Specific” versions of, while these are often a bit more specialized for bike purposes ( ie Allen Wrenches or Box End Wrenches) any decent brand will work, and can often be had for a lot less than their Bike-Specific counterparts.

Bike Specific Tool Brands

These are the Specialty Tools for Bike Specific Purposes
  • Park Tool
  • Pedros

Basic Bicycle Toolbox

If you ride a bike, you should have at LEAST these tools.
  • Metric Allen Wrench Set 3mm-10mm
  • A Floor Pump
  • Metric Box End Wrenches
  • Working Gloves, ie Mechanix
  • Chain Lubricant
  • Bike Specific Grease
  • Phillips and Flathead Screw Drivers
  • Electrical Tape
  • Super Glue
  • Tyre Levers
  • Rags, Rags, Rags

Bigger, Better Bike Box

Some Good Examples are:
The Nashbar Beginner Toolkit
Park Tool - Advanced Mechanic Tool Kit

These are more as-needed.
  • Crank Puller (If you have a Square Tapered Bottom Bracket)
  • Bottom Bracket Tool
  • Cable Cutters
  • Chain Whip
  • Cassette Tool
  • Bicycle Repair Stand
  • Truing Stand
  • Torque Wrench
  • Cone Wrenches
  • Chain Breaker / Chain Tool
  • Penetrating Oil
  • Boeshield T9

Don't Buy These

Unless you're planning on opening your own bike shop, it's easier to have a shop or go to a co-op to use these tools.
  • Headset Press
  • Bottom Bracket Chasing/Threading Tool
  • Rear Derailleur Straightening Tool
  • Spoke Cutter/Threader

Common Bike Fix Problems

How to Wrap Bar Tape
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fhXeSJQtoWU

Adjust a Front Derailleur

Set Up the Angle


Set up Height


Once it's aligned properly, you can set the cable tension and lever throw.

Step 1 - Grab the FD Cable and while pulling it, let out all the slack in the front shifter, if there is any slack in the cable, then you need to re-tension the cable (Continue to Step 2).

Step 2 - Loosen the Front Derailleur's binder bolt and pull the cable taut, then screw it down again.

Step 3 - That's it, you're done. Go ride your bike, or if you just got back grab a beer or something.

True a Wheel
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ww48YLhAiRI

Adjust a Rear Derailleur:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2j1gSwhsVN8

Dial in Brakes:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eAHrHDTsu5U

Adjust a Threadless Headset
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=87idYGmg77k

How to Mount a Tire
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-XUFVrl0UT4

How to Measure a Chain
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QuhHn7HaZcQ

Resources and Guides

Sheldon Brown's Website
Park Tool.com

Ohio City Bicycle Co-op - Shop Manual - A Wiki that covers Tools and Service

Bike Co-Ops

If you're interested in striking out on your own, check to see if you can volunteer at a nearby Bicycle Co-Op. Often times they'll have free classes and clinics and will let give volunteers free time with Tools and Repair stands in exchange for their time.

Here is a listing of such organizations.

CopperHound posted:

I made a tutorial to share with aspiring wheel builders for calculating spoke lengths.
https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1ULyPizAvmtR_SJlOeXDUb4XNIsOIiFklmvbsKRrEAMQ/edit?usp=sharing

I did not make a tutorial on how to physically measure a hub and rim. Figure that out yourself.

e.pilot fucked around with this message at 19:22 on Sep 29, 2020

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kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



Picking up the last 'open ticket' from old thread:

ExecuDork posted:

I'm trying to get back into biking for my commute, after not having done that for a decade. My wife and I went to the local tip (municipal waste dump, we're in Australia) and visited the Tip Shop, where they rescue still-useable stuff from the landfill / recylotron and sell it for cheap. We got two bikes plus a bunch of other stuff for $120 and now I'm in the process of restoring a literal piece of garbage back to rideability.

It's a 21-speed commuter bike, a nice comfortable frame and skinny tires. The tires on it were falling apart, so we pulled a couple of much nicer-looking and slightly wider tires out of a big bin, what I'd call a "hybrid" tire (fatter than a pure road tire, skinnier and with less aggressive tread than a mountain bike tire). Unfortunately, these tires are slightly smaller than the old worn out tires and the newer tires are on rims that will not fit on my bike frame. This means I cannot fit the tires onto the rims. At all. I've watched enough youtube videos to realise that the crucial first step, that most videos breeze right past, is impossible - I cannot get the first bead onto the rim. No es possible

So, I went to the local bike shops - there are 2 in this town - but they're closed on the weekends. So I guess I'll wait until I can spare some time to visit them during bank hours and try to buy new tires that fit my rims, or some other option. The idea here is to do this as cheaply as possible - hence the tip shop bikes and at least trying to get things done at home before involving a professional. I'm hoping to get some advice as I get this bike back on the road over the next few weeks, and commiserate with anybody else who's worked on a bike like mine. Think of the cheapest bike you've seen, then reduce its value by 90%.

kimbo305 posted:

You're probably looking at 27" aka 630mm (old standard) rims on your bike and replacement tires for 700C aka 622mm rims.
I would call ahead to see if they have 27" tires in stock.

It might be possible to swap 700C wheels onto your bikes -- you'd just need enough adjustment in the brake pads to lower them 4mm. This is easy to visually verify.

You'd need to make sure the rear 700C wheel came with a 7-speed cassette or freewheel, or that it has a matching hub style that can take the 7 speed cassette/freewheel from your current wheels. You may or may not be able to bodge a tool to wrench a freewheel off. You almost certainly wouldn't have the cassette lockring tool for freehubs.

ExecuDork posted:

Thanks, that's quite helpful! Yes, 8mm difference seems about right. The 700C rims are in good shape but the way they attach to a frame is different from the rims that came on the bike. The bike - and its wheels - being an older standard makes sense.

Perhaps ironically, all of the inner tubes - old and newer - are in good shape. It's just the old tires that are disintegrating. That's a very good point about calling ahead, it occurs to me I might need to special-order the tires. But now I have the terminology to look for them, thank you!

edit: a quick google and it looks like I can buy cheap-and-cheerful 27" tires for not too expensive online. I'll phone the local bike shops on Monday and see what's up.

I've certainly seen my share of inner tubes that can hold air when the tires are dry rotted, but I suspect many would have issues like my own junk bike pulled from a pile of leaves. The inner tube held up for a few months (!) before it split open at the valve.

If your current rims are steel, you should consider trying to upgrade to aluminum, as it's gonna let you stop faster. And look at what kind of brake pads you have (how they would be replaced) and what condition they're in. New pads on steel rims would still have a chance compared to bad ones. You might want to invest in a set of brake pads with replacable inserts, depending on how long you intend to keep the bike.

iospace
Jan 19, 2038




What's the derailleur hanger used on the Journeyman? Mine got bent after a clipless related fall.

EvilJoven
Mar 18, 2005


Fun Shoe

iospace posted:

What's the derailleur hanger used on the Journeyman? Mine got bent after a clipless related fall.

Wheels #25. Go buy 2. Trust me.

iospace
Jan 19, 2038




EvilJoven posted:

Wheels #25. Go buy 2. Trust me.

Done.

Quick question though, grease the threads or no when I change it out?

Salt Fish
Sep 11, 2003
WANTING A VACCINE DOES NOT MAKE SOMEONE AN ANTIVAXXER, DUMBASS

Cybernetic Crumb

What do you guys think? Scotch tape or maybe some kind of glue?



EvilJoven
Mar 18, 2005


Fun Shoe

iospace posted:

Done.

Quick question though, grease the threads or no when I change it out?

Yup.

Salt Fish posted:

What do you guys think? Scotch tape or maybe some kind of glue?





Also yup.

CopperHound
Feb 14, 2012



I personally would recommend the pedals that aren't designed to break in half.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8-QNAwUdHUQ

ExecuDork
Feb 25, 2007

We might be fucked, sir.

Fallen Rib

kimbo305 posted:

Picking up the last 'open ticket' from old thread:

kimbo305 posted:

I've certainly seen my share of inner tubes that can hold air when the tires are dry rotted, but I suspect many would have issues like my own junk bike pulled from a pile of leaves. The inner tube held up for a few months (!) before it split open at the valve.

If your current rims are steel, you should consider trying to upgrade to aluminum, as it's gonna let you stop faster. And look at what kind of brake pads you have (how they would be replaced) and what condition they're in. New pads on steel rims would still have a chance compared to bad ones. You might want to invest in a set of brake pads with replacable inserts, depending on how long you intend to keep the bike.

Good points. I'll ask the bike shop when I call them today about rims, after I go out to the garage and see if I can figure out what my current rims are made of. Presumably there's a way to make sure I get rims that fit my bike (and the rear sprocket can migrate). If I have to go that way, getting modern wheels (i.e. new standard 700C) is probably worthwhile, too. Brakes are high on the list of fix-it-before-riding-it stuff, new pads are almost certainly in the cards. Thanks again for your pulled-from-leaves insight, that's exactly the kind of previous experience I was hoping to learn from.

EDIT: out of curiosity, the better stopping power of Al wheels is from greater friction, rather than lower weight, right? The difference in weight between steel wheels and Al wheels must be outweighed by a bigger-than-average breakfast in this space of commuting on cheapness.

kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



ExecuDork posted:

EDIT: out of curiosity, the better stopping power of Al wheels is from greater friction, rather than lower weight, right?

Yeah, just the surface finish. Most steel rims are chromed, which makes them too smooth, especially in the wet.

eSporks
Jun 10, 2011



I've always been curious about that myth.

In the BMX world, everyone knows it's the opposite. Chrome rims provide far superior stopping power than anodized.

I've definitely experienced garbage performance on cheap beach cruisers with chrome rims though.

Does anyone know what's actually going on there? Because it's not as a simple as chrome/not-chrome.

Flatland Crusoe
Jan 12, 2011

Great White Hunter
Master Race

Let me explain why I'm better than you


eSporks posted:

I've always been curious about that myth.

In the BMX world, everyone knows it's the opposite. Chrome rims provide far superior stopping power than anodized.

I've definitely experienced garbage performance on cheap beach cruisers with chrome rims though.

Does anyone know what's actually going on there? Because it's not as a simple as chrome/not-chrome.

Back in the cyclocross dark ages when we used cantilever brakes we would sometimes score our rims with a box cutter perpendicular to the wheel rotation to get better stopping......

CopperHound
Feb 14, 2012



eSporks posted:

I've always been curious about that myth.

In the BMX world, everyone knows it's the opposite. Chrome rims provide far superior stopping power than anodized.

I've definitely experienced garbage performance on cheap beach cruisers with chrome rims though.

Does anyone know what's actually going on there? Because it's not as a simple as chrome/not-chrome.
Judging by the few BMX bikes I've worked on, stopping power is not a concern that designers give much thought to. Have you tried a side by side comparison of different wheels on same bike?

The stopping power difference becomes much more noticeable in wet conditions. You need the iron oxide based brake pads to get wet steel rims to do anything more than just sorta slow you down a little.

Some steel rims are textured for increased brake performance:

CopperHound fucked around with this message at 20:55 on Jul 28, 2020

marshalljim
Mar 6, 2013

yospos


Scoring braking surfaces is apparently pretty common among trials riders, too

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2I38U75yePM

EvilJoven
Mar 18, 2005


Fun Shoe

Getting three different wheel sets with hubs from different manufacturers to cooperate across two different bikes involves a lot of time patience and a handful of 0.5 and 1mm 6 bolt rotor spacers.

But it's better than realigning calipers every other ride.

Edit: itd be only 1 spacer if not for the shitry Joytech hubs on the Journeyman 650 wheels. Gonna be a lot easier to run multiple wheels when those die and I get more hopes.

Hell I'm thinking of ordering 2 sets and just building wheels over winter.

EvilJoven fucked around with this message at 17:36 on Jul 29, 2020

jammyozzy
Dec 7, 2006

Is that a challenge?

Hah, to stop the front brake rubbing on one of my bf's bikes we've had to pack around 1.5mm of shims between the LH hub bearing and end cap on both sets of wheels he has for it. Otherwise even with the caliper pushed out hard against the screws the outer pad rubs the disc constantly.

I originally thousht it was a poo poo hub that came with the OG wheels but now the second wheelset does it too I'm leaning towards the caliper mounts being out of position vs. the dropouts. At least the shims are easier/saner than my early ideas of putting a custom bend in the disc or taking a dremel to the caliper.

iospace
Jan 19, 2038





I don't think hangers are supposed to look like that (front of bike perspective).

eSporks
Jun 10, 2011



CopperHound posted:

Judging by the few BMX bikes I've worked on, stopping power is not a concern that designers give much thought to. Have you tried a side by side comparison of different wheels on same bike?
Scuse me?

That pic is actually me, I have lots of experience with chrome and ano rims on identical set ups. Its common knowledge in the BMX world.

quote:

The stopping power difference becomes much more noticeable in wet conditions. You need the iron oxide based brake pads to get wet steel rims to do anything more than just sorta slow you down a little.

Some steel rims are textured for increased brake performance:

I am really curious if the rim being steel is a factor here. I can definitely confirm that every chrome steel rim I have encountered has poor brake performance.
Mid to high end BMX rims are aluminum that is first coated in a primer, usually copper or zinc, and then chrome plated. I am not sure why or if that makes a difference in braking power, but I am certain a high end BMX chrome rim performs better than a high end ano rim.

I've always been bothered by this myth about chrome rims. It does have merit, and is certainly true about low end chrome rims, but its not true across the board. Something else has to be at work.

Flatland Crusoe posted:

Back in the cyclocross dark ages when we used cantilever brakes we would sometimes score our rims with a box cutter perpendicular to the wheel rotation to get better stopping......
Brakes in picture are canti's. FWIW

CopperHound
Feb 14, 2012



eSporks posted:

Scuse me?
It could be that I mostly deal with BMX shaped objects, but between stamped steal cailpers, u-brakes, a gyro, and the front brake cable making a u-turn, they seem mostly vestigial.

I want to see more close up pics of your bike that actually has functional brakes.

Salt Fish
Sep 11, 2003
WANTING A VACCINE DOES NOT MAKE SOMEONE AN ANTIVAXXER, DUMBASS

Cybernetic Crumb

There's definitely a huge gap between kids "bmx bikes", low end bmx completes in the 200-500 dollar range, and then the pro level stuff. I think part of it is that if you ride bmx as a serious sport the bikes are mechanically simple enough that you're probably not going to need a shop very often.

Salt Fish fucked around with this message at 23:22 on Jul 29, 2020

EvilJoven
Mar 18, 2005


Fun Shoe

jammyozzy posted:

Hah, to stop the front brake rubbing on one of my bf's bikes we've had to pack around 1.5mm of shims between the LH hub bearing and end cap on both sets of wheels he has for it. Otherwise even with the caliper pushed out hard against the screws the outer pad rubs the disc constantly.

I originally thousht it was a poo poo hub that came with the OG wheels but now the second wheelset does it too I'm leaning towards the caliper mounts being out of position vs. the dropouts. At least the shims are easier/saner than my early ideas of putting a custom bend in the disc or taking a dremel to the caliper.

And chance the end caps aren't the same for left and right and all this time you've been running with the caps in wrong?

kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



eSporks posted:

I am really curious if the rim being steel is a factor here. I can definitely confirm that every chrome steel rim I have encountered has poor brake performance.

I've always been bothered by this myth about chrome rims. It does have merit, and is certainly true about low end chrome rims, but its not true across the board. Something else has to be at work.

I submitted a q to Lennard Zinn's Q&A column in VeloNews; just need to remember to keep checking.

eSporks
Jun 10, 2011



CopperHound posted:

It could be that I mostly deal with BMX shaped objects, but between stamped steal cailpers, u-brakes, a gyro, and the front brake cable making a u-turn, they seem mostly vestigial.

I want to see more close up pics of your bike that actually has functional brakes.
It was an old bike from years ago and pretty custom, but I've had good brake performance on normal u-brake set ups too.


Housing stop in topcap, cable runs through the steerer and out a hole in the crown.


Center pull cantilevers, with a spoke yolk for maximum stiffness.

kimbo305 posted:

I submitted a q to Lennard Zinn's Q&A column in VeloNews; just need to remember to keep checking.
Sweet!, I'd love to hear what he says.

jammyozzy
Dec 7, 2006

Is that a challenge?

EvilJoven posted:

And chance the end caps aren't the same for left and right and all this time you've been running with the caps in wrong?

Nah the caps match side to side, I measured them when I was checking the shims would still allow the caps to fully engage in the bearings.

Dog Case
Oct 7, 2003



I thought the thing with chrome vs. aluminum rims was that they both worked ok when dry, but chrome became useless when wet while aluminum just became "not great".

Safety Dance
Sep 10, 2007

Five degrees to starboard!


What's a good vendor for inner tubes? I need to replace a Schwalbe #19 tube that fits a 700x48c tire. Looking for something heavy duty, since the last tube developed a pinhole leak on the seam after about 200 miles.

CopperHound
Feb 14, 2012



I just use Q-tubes. They are qbp's house brand and appear to be repackaged Kenda tubes.

Tubes are just a commodity to me though. I get whatever is cheapest and not labeled as extra light or heavy duty.

jammyozzy
Dec 7, 2006

Is that a challenge?

I like Conti tubes well enough, they seem pretty reliable and the Presta ones have removable valve cores which are useful to steal for blocked tubeless valves.

nm
Jan 28, 2008

"I saw Minos the Space Judge holding a golden sceptre and passing sentence upon the Martians. There he presided, and around him the noble Space Prosecutors sought the firm justice of space law."

jammyozzy posted:

I like Conti tubes well enough, they seem pretty reliable and the Presta ones have removable valve cores which are useful to steal for blocked tubeless valves.

Contis valves aren't as long as q-tubes long valves and don't seem to be available longer.

jammyozzy
Dec 7, 2006

Is that a challenge?

nm posted:

Contis valves aren't as long as q-tubes long valves and don't seem to be available longer.

Fair enough, I don't own any rims that are even close to deep and haven't bought a tube in ~2 years so I'm a little out of the loop.

Safety Dance
Sep 10, 2007

Five degrees to starboard!


If I have 700x48 tires, am I asking for trouble using a 700x28-35 tube?

jamal
Apr 15, 2003

I'll set the building on fire

Yeah that's a bit of a stretch. Tube will probably tear along a "seam" or at the valve stem after awhile.

bicievino
Feb 5, 2015



Safety Dance posted:

If I have 700x48 tires, am I asking for trouble using a 700x28-35 tube?

I carry down a few sizes as a spare for storage size reasons, but for general use I figure stick with the full size tubes. When I use a smaller size it seems to have trouble seating the bead.

jamal posted:

Yeah that's a bit of a stretch. Tube will probably tear along a "seam" or at the valve stem after awhile.

I see what you did here.

nm
Jan 28, 2008

"I saw Minos the Space Judge holding a golden sceptre and passing sentence upon the Martians. There he presided, and around him the noble Space Prosecutors sought the firm justice of space law."

Safety Dance posted:

If I have 700x48 tires, am I asking for trouble using a 700x28-35 tube?

Yes. I'm running 29x2 tubes. Rather go slightly oversized than undersized

CopperHound
Feb 14, 2012



nm posted:

Rather go slightly oversized than undersized
I personally like one size smaller better than one size bigger, but I would probably call 35 two sizes smaller than 48.

MacPac
Jun 2, 2006



Grimey Drawer

do any of you have some weird old tricks for unseating tight beads from rims? Im getting a wicked forearm workout from trying to remove this conti gp 5000 tire, but its not coming off

Salt Fish
Sep 11, 2003
WANTING A VACCINE DOES NOT MAKE SOMEONE AN ANTIVAXXER, DUMBASS

Cybernetic Crumb

Did you drink a beer? One beer per rim.

MacPac
Jun 2, 2006



Grimey Drawer

Salt Fish posted:

Did you drink a beer? One beer per rim.

this seems like it warrants further research and test trials

Havana Affair
Apr 6, 2009


You can try to get some soapy water in there to reduce friction. And drink a beer.

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evil_bunnY
Apr 2, 2003



MacPac posted:

do any of you have some weird old tricks for unseating tight beads from rims? Im getting a wicked forearm workout from trying to remove this conti gp 5000 tire, but its not coming off
Leave it out to bake in the sun for a bit. When you go at it make sure the bead side opposite the one you're pulling on is in the trench in the middle of the rim.

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