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bicievino
Feb 5, 2015



And then once it's off never buy a tire that says Continental again

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e.pilot
Nov 20, 2011

MR.FUSION
#TEAMTRASHMILES


MacPac posted:

do any of you have some weird old tricks for unseating tight beads from rims? Im getting a wicked forearm workout from trying to remove this conti gp 5000 tire, but its not coming off

hot water and a good tire lever

fill your tub or sink with enough hot water to submerge a good portion of the wheel at a time until itís all fairly warm, the idea being it hopefully softens up the rubber enough to let it slide off easier

Pantsmaster Bill
May 7, 2007



e.pilot posted:

hot water and a good tire lever


This reminds me, I need some good tire levers.

Is it normal to have a tiny bit of wiggle/play on a cassette? I noticed it when cleaning my bike earlier, just a little bit of movement when you wiggle it. Lockring is cranked down and there's no movement along the axis of the axle. No issues with shifting either, just wondering if it's indicative of an issue.

EvilJoven
Mar 18, 2005


Fun Shoe

Could be a little bit of play in the freehub. Some hubs are just like that, especially the more inexpensive ones.

Edit: if you've never taken apart a freehub body to try to take that play out lemme tell ya it's a whole lot of work messing about with the stack of paper thin shims and itty bitty bearings. It sucks a lot. Just leave it unless it's causing problems.

EvilJoven fucked around with this message at 16:19 on Aug 2, 2020

Pantsmaster Bill
May 7, 2007



They're Aksiums, but I did find them on the street for free. I'll keep an eye on it and maybe get the hubs serviced before winter.

jamal
Apr 15, 2003

I'll set the building on fire

I knew they were mavics before you even said it.

The freehub has a plastic bushing that rides on the hub body. They wear and eventually you'll notice it doesn't shift as well. There's an ebay store called hubdoctor that sells oversized bushings and bearing replacements. They sort of work. I tried a couple of bushings and the bearing kit on my ksyriums but am glad to just be on nicer wheels now.

Al2001
Apr 7, 2007

You've gone through at the back


EvilJoven posted:

Edit: if you've never taken apart a freehub body to try to take that play out lemme tell ya it's a whole lot of work messing about with the stack of paper thin shims and itty bitty bearings. It sucks a lot. Just leave it unless it's causing problems.

I was thinking of having a look inside the freehub on my pub bike, cos I think one of the pawls is stuck down. It doesn't bother me too much so I probably won't now!

BeastPussy
Jul 15, 2003

im so mumped up lmao

Opened up my wobbly Aksium hub to find that the bushing was shot and one of the two pawls was missing the entire spring. No clue where it went. Ended up buying a new freehub and pawl & spring kit.

nm
Jan 28, 2008

"I saw Minos the Space Judge holding a golden sceptre and passing sentence upon the Martians. There he presided, and around him the noble Space Prosecutors sought the firm justice of space law."

CopperHound posted:

I personally like one size smaller better than one size bigger, but I would probably call 35 two sizes smaller than 48.

On 48 particularly I had a lot of flat issues due to rub running 45mm tubes. Switched to 2.0 and they went away.

CopperHound
Feb 14, 2012



nm posted:

On 48 particularly I had a lot of flat issues due to rub running 45mm tubes. Switched to 2.0 and they went away.
I think it is worth noting that you might be an edge case to the newcomers here that might have trouble stuffing a larger tube into a tire without pinching it.

bicievino
Feb 5, 2015



Also I'd love to hear a good argument for running tires wider than say... 32mm with tubes

Skarsnik
Oct 21, 2008

I...AM...RUUUDE!






MacPac posted:

do any of you have some weird old tricks for unseating tight beads from rims? Im getting a wicked forearm workout from trying to remove this conti gp 5000 tire, but its not coming off

Have you tried swearing a lot

FogHelmut
Dec 18, 2003

Your authority is not recognized in Fort Kickass.


bicievino posted:

Also I'd love to hear a good argument for running tires wider than say... 32mm with tubes

It costs less?

jammyozzy
Dec 7, 2006

Is that a challenge?

bicievino posted:

Also I'd love to hear a good argument for running tires wider than say... 32mm with tubes

I once ripped open a gravelking SK so badly it wouldn't seal and almost had to put a tube in to ride the two miles home.



Cleverly I'd forgotten to pack any tubes that day, so I endured the lesser shame of pushing my bike home instead.

jamal
Apr 15, 2003

I'll set the building on fire

Having finally gone 40mm and tubeless on my cx bike this spring, I'm an idiot for not doing it years ago. (Well mostly i was trying to avoid buying a new set of wheels for that bike).

kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



I tour on 42mm with tubes. Iíd prob go tubeless if the tires were.

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007

wacky cycling inflatable
tube man


FogHelmut posted:

It costs less?

I have to bin most traditional clincher tires long before the tread wears out. With tubeless tires, I almost always wear them down to the cord. Also there is some dollar amount tied to less often having to repair a flat as the sun is setting and the temp is dropping.

TobinHatesYou fucked around with this message at 05:33 on Aug 3, 2020

norp
Jan 20, 2004

TRUMP TRUMP TRUMP

let's invade New Zealand, they have oil


nm posted:

Contis valves aren't as long as q-tubes long valves and don't seem to be available longer.

Conti valves max out at 60mm but they sell an extension

Which is great for me, I only have one wheel that needs longer than 60mm stems and it's easy enough to just swap out the valve core on the street if you have the little tool they give you in the packet with you.

Lord Rupert
Dec 28, 2007

Neither seen, nor heard


Any thoughts on wether this cassette is too worn or not would be appreciated. Got a cyclical clunking/clicking when pedaling but not coasting. Three seasons of mountain biking on this drivetrain, with a new chain still made the same noises around the block. Probably just taking it in anyways, but I gotta wait a days time for that.

e.pilot
Nov 20, 2011

MR.FUSION
#TEAMTRASHMILES


looks fine from here

bicievino
Feb 5, 2015



FogHelmut posted:

It costs less?

Does it?
For comparable tires it seems like it's between zero and $15 more for the tubeless ones, plus a bit of sealant. Figure two or three tubes per life of tire puts you almost to the same price?

jammyozzy posted:

I once ripped open a gravelking SK so badly it wouldn't seal and almost had to put a tube in to ride the two miles home.



Cleverly I'd forgotten to pack any tubes that day, so I endured the lesser shame of pushing my bike home instead.

Sure, but like, a rip that bad would've hosed up any tube, too, maybe too bad to patch/boot?

CopperHound
Feb 14, 2012



Lord Rupert posted:

Any thoughts on wether this cassette is too worn or not would be appreciated. Got a cyclical clunking/clicking when pedaling but not coasting. Three seasons of mountain biking on this drivetrain, with a new chain still made the same noises around the block. Probably just taking it in anyways, but I gotta wait a days time for that.


Does the new chain skip? No? Then keep using it.

FogHelmut
Dec 18, 2003

Your authority is not recognized in Fort Kickass.


bicievino posted:

Does it?
For comparable tires it seems like it's between zero and $15 more for the tubeless ones, plus a bit of sealant. Figure two or three tubes per life of tire puts you almost to the same price?


Sure, but like, a rip that bad would've hosed up any tube, too, maybe too bad to patch/boot?

Do the rims cost less? Cheaper speced bikes often come with tube rims and tires. I mean technically with enough tape and sealant anything is tubeless.

bicievino
Feb 5, 2015



FogHelmut posted:

Do the rims cost less? Cheaper speced bikes often come with tube rims and tires. I mean technically with enough tape and sealant anything is tubeless.

I admit I don't have an encyclopedic knowledge of current lower-end gravel bikes (narrowing to that given the selection of what can clear wider tires), but I checked the bottom-rung Journeyman and it come with tubeless compatible wheels.
Good quality tubeless rims and wheelsets are very affordable (just not light), and obviously more expensive than zero dollars for a non-compatible wheelset you already have.

I guess I should have put more caveats on my statement? "My bike does not have tubeless compatible wheels rn" obviously counts as a good reason to not run tubeless tires, lol. I suppose I considered that one had the option to do it implicit in my challenge?

FogHelmut
Dec 18, 2003

Your authority is not recognized in Fort Kickass.


This is why I stayed out of cycling for 5 years.

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007

wacky cycling inflatable
tube man


FogHelmut posted:

Do the rims cost less? Cheaper speced bikes often come with tube rims and tires. I mean technically with enough tape and sealant anything is tubeless.

Just looked. Something like a $799 Trek FX 3 comes with tubeless wheels.

nm
Jan 28, 2008

"I saw Minos the Space Judge holding a golden sceptre and passing sentence upon the Martians. There he presided, and around him the noble Space Prosecutors sought the firm justice of space law."

bicievino posted:

Also I'd love to hear a good argument for running tires wider than say... 32mm with tubes

Chukkers don't do tubeless.

Also, I don't really want to tour tubeless nor have to mount tubeless while assembling the bike in my lovely motel room after a flight. (700x48s won't fit in my box inflated).

My non-touring bike is going tubesless with cliffhangers.

nm fucked around with this message at 05:49 on Aug 3, 2020

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007

wacky cycling inflatable
tube man


nm posted:

Chukkers don't do tubeless.

Also, I don't really want to tour tubeless nor have to mount tubeless while assembling the bike in my lovely motel room after a flight. (700x48s won't fit in my box inflated).

My non-touring bike is going tubesless with cliffhangers.

Seems like it would be 50/50 depending on the goal of the tour.

Considering how many times Francis/James/Lawrence flatted on their tour from San Diego to Seattle, I think they should have gone tubeless. They insist that tubeless wouldn't have been worth it in the desert, but I kinda think it would have been as long as one of them carried a shop bottle of Orange Seal. As always, it's best to check set-ups for weird issues before a big tour/ride. I'm sure there are easy to mount big tire combos. You can always use something like a KOM Cycling syringe to suck sealant out of a tire for travel, then deflate the tire. Also I think it's a pretty low number of people who tour on tires that wide in general?

CopperHound
Feb 14, 2012



I start tours tubeless now. So far I'm at 5 out of 6 tires making it to the return flight without having to put a tube in.

That 1 instance was because I wore a tire down to the casing and I decided to not to attempt the futile effort of setting a bead with a hand pump on the edge of a road halfway up a mountain. Also neither tire was designed to be tubeless

Flatland Crusoe
Jan 12, 2011

Great White Hunter
Master Race

Let me explain why I'm better than you


nm posted:

Also, I don't really want to tour tubeless nor have to mount tubeless while assembling the bike in my lovely motel room after a flight. (700x48s won't fit in my box inflated).

I used to wrestle this when flying to mountain bike race since 29 x 2.3ís fix in few bike boxes/bags not made in the last few years and then the $50 airshot canisters became available and solved that headache of seating tubeless tires with only a pump.

Tubeless is great once you get to 700x38ís or bigger. Like never look back good. Tubeless still sucks for cyclocross 700x32ís if you want supples tires running 18-25 psi, it just doesnít have the volume and burps too easily. Luckily we have Clement/Donnelson tubeless tubulars that are pretty bulletproof and actually handle well.

For Gravel you usually have a stiffer tire design and more volume so tubeless works quite well, especially with purpose built wheels and tires. I would not say the same thing from 7-8 years ago when we were running Michelin Jet 700x 30 cyclocross tires tubeless for Gravel events on converted rims.....

On my current mountain bike tubeless setup I basically have never flatted with trail weight tires over the last 3 years. Keep in mind with racier tires and different environments this may vary.

The tubeless technology has really matured in certain applications and 700x48ís are a prime candidate. I also realize that touring guys also still think STI shifters are liability so you may still tread slowly into the 21st century.

Flatland Crusoe fucked around with this message at 16:06 on Aug 3, 2020

e.pilot
Nov 20, 2011

MR.FUSION
#TEAMTRASHMILES


road tubeless is real good

nm
Jan 28, 2008

"I saw Minos the Space Judge holding a golden sceptre and passing sentence upon the Martians. There he presided, and around him the noble Space Prosecutors sought the firm justice of space law."

TobinHatesYou posted:

Seems like it would be 50/50 depending on the goal of the tour.

Considering how many times Francis/James/Lawrence flatted on their tour from San Diego to Seattle, I think they should have gone tubeless. They insist that tubeless wouldn't have been worth it in the desert, but I kinda think it would have been as long as one of them carried a shop bottle of Orange Seal. As always, it's best to check set-ups for weird issues before a big tour/ride. I'm sure there are easy to mount big tire combos. You can always use something like a KOM Cycling syringe to suck sealant out of a tire for travel, then deflate the tire. Also I think it's a pretty low number of people who tour on tires that wide in general?

Everyone should tour on 48s if they have the clearance.

All of that sounds much more of a pain in the rear end than tubes. You can run something like shikoros or put orange seal in your tubes for flat resistance, and it will be less of a pain in the rear end for touring IMHO.

CopperHound
Feb 14, 2012



nm posted:

put orange seal in your tubes for flat resistance,
I keep seeing people saying this, but I am yet to see any evidence of it being effective.

Clark Nova
Jul 17, 2004



bicievino posted:

I admit I don't have an encyclopedic knowledge of current lower-end gravel bikes (narrowing to that given the selection of what can clear wider tires), but I checked the bottom-rung Journeyman and it come with tubeless compatible wheels.
Good quality tubeless rims and wheelsets are very affordable (just not light), and obviously more expensive than zero dollars for a non-compatible wheelset you already have.

I guess I should have put more caveats on my statement? "My bike does not have tubeless compatible wheels rn" obviously counts as a good reason to not run tubeless tires, lol. I suppose I considered that one had the option to do it implicit in my challenge?

I bought a Claris-level GT Grade a few years ago that came with tubeless rims so I think nearly any bike you buy today that can fit wider tires should be able to.

To add to the incidental costs of tubeless, there are also valve stems (which cost at least as much as a tube each), tape (which is cheap if you get strapping tape or expensive if you get the branded stuff to match your rims), and an air compressor or inflator canister thing if you want to get them mounted at home. I'd say it is definitely pricier overall for me but worth it

e.pilot
Nov 20, 2011

MR.FUSION
#TEAMTRASHMILES


CopperHound posted:

I keep seeing people saying this, but I am yet to see any evidence of it being effective.

I double flatted last week with orange seal in the tubes, reinflated and went on to do 150 more miles and counting still holding air no problem.

CopperHound
Feb 14, 2012



e.pilot posted:

I double flatted last week with orange seal in the tubes, reinflated and went on to do 150 more miles and counting still holding air no problem.
Okay. Maybe a stupid question, but I only ask because I've seen it before: Is your tube or the tire holding the air in?

Benson Cunningham
Dec 9, 2006

Chief of J.U.N.K.E.R. H.Q.


Edit: Wrong bike thread!

FireTora
Oct 6, 2004



CopperHound posted:

I keep seeing people saying this, but I am yet to see any evidence of it being effective.


I tried it a couple years ago, got a pin hole puncture just as I got to the station and sealant just started spraying out of the hole and never sealed it. I assume the powder they put in tubes to keep them from bonding when deflated hosed with it, or at least caused the flakes to bond so they couldn't plug the hole. Haven't tried again since.

kill me now
Sep 14, 2003

Why's Hank crying?

'CUZ HE JUST GOT DUNKED ON!

Clark Nova posted:

and an air compressor or inflator canister thing if you want to get them mounted at home. I'd say it is definitely pricier overall for me but worth it

This is not entirely true, Iíve set up tubeless on 2 bikes one 38c and one 28c with a floor pump.

Just seat the tires with tubes and leave them overnight to set in. As long as you donít pop both beads when you take the tube out you will probably be able to get it to seat tubeless with a floor pump.

If that fails soapy water should do the trick.

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spf3million
Sep 27, 2007

hit 'em with the rhythm

I spent $80 a couple years ago on a pump with a large side cylinder and a switch next to the valve to release the compressed air from the cylinder into the tire all at once. Works great.

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