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vikingstrike
Sep 23, 2007

whats happening, captain

Either way, if the chain was used too long that wouldnít be out of the ordinary for needing to replace the cassette and maybe chainrings.

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CopperHound
Feb 14, 2012



You need a new cassette.

Samopsa
Nov 9, 2009

Krijgt geen speciaal kerstdiner!


allright, thanks goons! All the goddamn cassettes are sold out lmao, just gonna take the semi-pristine one off my trainer then I guess until they're back in stock.

e: yup that fixed it, the teeth of my cassette were def. quite worn.

Samopsa fucked around with this message at 14:59 on Mar 2, 2021

VideoGameVet
May 14, 2005

It is by caffeine alone I set my bike in motion. It is by the juice of Java that pedaling acquires speed, the teeth acquire stains, stains become a warning. It is by caffeine alone I set my bike in motion.

VelociBacon posted:

I actually think this was already compromised, it's not a close up (you can take a better look IRL) but these areas seem fouled/darker than the other areas:



It would be weird to have two points of failure from stress like that but it could be that this indicates a failure was already there as dirt had already gotten onto those surfaces, compared to the bright grey areas where the metal failed just now.

Probabily saved my rear end, maybe my life.

The new fork:

VideoGameVet
May 14, 2005

It is by caffeine alone I set my bike in motion. It is by the juice of Java that pedaling acquires speed, the teeth acquire stains, stains become a warning. It is by caffeine alone I set my bike in motion.

evil_bunnY posted:

Are you putting a good brake on it while you're in there?

The BB7's aren't bad, but now that I'm back to consulting (LA Gig ended) I have to be frugal.

VideoGameVet
May 14, 2005

It is by caffeine alone I set my bike in motion. It is by the juice of Java that pedaling acquires speed, the teeth acquire stains, stains become a warning. It is by caffeine alone I set my bike in motion.

Salt Fish posted:



Holy moly look at this bike

The original crank-forward bike.

LordOfThePants
Sep 25, 2002



Can I use a tubing cutter like this:

https://www.amazon.com/RIDGID-32975-Quarters-Tubing-Cutter/dp/B000LDGNCU

To cut brake line housing? I ordered a Pedros cutter but itís MIA from Amazon and Iíve got a little tubing cutter like the one above that I think might work. Iíd like to finish this job tonight since the weather is getting nice this week and I can start riding at work again.

Partial Octopus
Feb 4, 2006





LordOfThePants posted:

Can I use a tubing cutter like this:

https://www.amazon.com/RIDGID-32975-Quarters-Tubing-Cutter/dp/B000LDGNCU

To cut brake line housing? I ordered a Pedros cutter but itís MIA from Amazon and Iíve got a little tubing cutter like the one above that I think might work. Iíd like to finish this job tonight since the weather is getting nice this week and I can start riding at work again.

No. That is used for pipes. You could use that for cutting your bars though. For brake lines and housing you could use a cable cutter. Something like this: https://www.amazon.com/Muzata-Steel...0NsaWNrPXRydWU=

HarmB
Jun 19, 2006





Partial Octopus posted:

LordOfThePants posted:

Can I use a tubing cutter like this:
To cut brake line housing? I ordered a Pedros cutter but it’s MIA from Amazon and I’ve got a little tubing cutter like the one above that I think might work. I’d like to finish this job tonight since the weather is getting nice this week and I can start riding at work again.
No. That is used for pipes. You could use that for cutting your bars though. For brake lines and housing you could use a cable cutter. Something like this:

And if you have a spare bit of cable, it helps to stick some cable in the housing at the point you're cutting it.

LordOfThePants
Sep 25, 2002



Thanks guys. Iíve got a cable cutter like that en route, itís just scheduled for delivery tomorrow (after first being scheduled for yesterday, then today), so I wasnít optimistic about it showing up tomorrow either.

I ended up using the ďold cable inside it and diagonal cuttersĒ technique. It worked well.

Mauser
Dec 16, 2003

Weird. Very weird.
It's weird in here.


Any ideas what a rhythmic popping sound might be only during medium to fast speeds seemingly coming from the tire? Just started after I inflated the tires and I'm guessing they're not properly seated maybe?

VelociBacon
Dec 8, 2009



Mauser posted:

Any ideas what a rhythmic popping sound might be only during medium to fast speeds seemingly coming from the tire? Just started after I inflated the tires and I'm guessing they're not properly seated maybe?

Possibly bad bearings in the hub, or an overtightened hub.

Mauser
Dec 16, 2003

Weird. Very weird.
It's weird in here.


Back to the shop then, i guess!

Voodoofly
Jul 3, 2002

Some days even my
lucky rocketship underpants
don't help


Any recommendations on torque wrenches? I donít have any at the moment. I enjoy wrenching on bikes but it will be for bolt checks and other minor things, Iím not assembling a bike or anything. That said I donít mind paying a little more now for something that will last and fulfill a variety of functions down the road.

VelociBacon
Dec 8, 2009



Voodoofly posted:

Any recommendations on torque wrenches? I donít have any at the moment. I enjoy wrenching on bikes but it will be for bolt checks and other minor things, Iím not assembling a bike or anything. That said I donít mind paying a little more now for something that will last and fulfill a variety of functions down the road.

Most torque wrenches don't go low enough to be used on stuff like m5 bolts you see on bikes so make sure whatever you end up with goes low. Also look for something in newton-meters because ft/lbs is not commonly used.

I have this one and it's fine. I found that my comfort level with most of the recommended torques is low and I end up overtorquing everything just like I normally would I guess. I have 20 years of habit when it comes to how much to tighten stem bolts and pivots and it's very difficult to trust that using 65% as much torque is going to be enough.

LordOfThePants
Sep 25, 2002



Voodoofly posted:

Any recommendations on torque wrenches? I donít have any at the moment. I enjoy wrenching on bikes but it will be for bolt checks and other minor things, Iím not assembling a bike or anything. That said I donít mind paying a little more now for something that will last and fulfill a variety of functions down the road.

I bought this one for working on my bikes:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01M12284X/

Made in Taiwan, Tekton stuff is pretty good midrange quality. I bought a set of their hex bit sockets too. No complaints, some of the reviews said the click feedback was weak but itís solid in mine.

Levitate
Sep 30, 2005

randy newman voice

YOU'VE GOT A LAFRENI»RE IN ME


LordOfThePants posted:

I bought this one for working on my bikes:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01M12284X/

Made in Taiwan, Tekton stuff is pretty good midrange quality. I bought a set of their hex bit sockets too. No complaints, some of the reviews said the click feedback was weak but itís solid in mine.

I have that one too, seems fine.

vikingstrike
Sep 23, 2007

whats happening, captain

If you are getting one for bottom bracket use, make sure it can measure torque in the counterclockwise direction. Not all of them do and I almost screwed up as a result of expecting a click that never came.

jamal
Apr 15, 2003

I'll set the building on fire

I also have that tekton wrench, but i bought it straight from tekton's website instead of amazon. Got a set of 1/4" drive hex sockets (and already had a t25) to go with it, plus a 1/2 drive 8mm for the dub cranks on my new mtb.

kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



kimbo305 posted:

Recs for bladed spoke holder? I have Mavic Ellipses and Zipp 404s, which seem to be quite different in spoke profile. But guessing most tools are universal?

I got the BSH-4, and also got the SW-40/42 boxed spoke wrenches. But... they don't play very well with each other. The cylindrical shape of the holder is just too fat for the loop handle.
You're supposed to hold the spoke at the very end of the bladed section, right?

I'm thinking about cutting open the loop and unfurling it to make a little box wrench.

sweat poteto
Feb 16, 2006

Everybody's gotta learn sometime

kimbo305 posted:

I'm thinking about cutting open the loop and unfurling it to make a little box wrench.

The dt holder worked OK for me with the sw40, but I have seen some people strip the rubber off the top/inside part to give more clearance at that point.

Cat Ass Trophy
Jul 24, 2007
I can do twice the work in half the time

So one of my neighbors asked for some help getting a tire on to a wheel. This bike is a penny farthing style bike that was made from "modern" parts. And by modern I would guess 70's. The front wheel is a steel rim, probably a standard 27". In any case, I can't find any markings as he has spray painted the entire rim, including the inside bed. He hands me the wheel and it just feels oily.

"Oh, I had trouble getting the last tire on so I oiled up the rim to try to get it to fit. That didn't work, so I CUT THE BEAD"

I just stared at him.

"Yeah, I pumped it up to 50 pounds and was riding down the street and it just blew off"

At this point I told him to just take it to a bike shop. I want no part in whatever happens next.

eSporks
Jun 10, 2011



Should have told him to take it to the dump. That guy is just going to waste the shops time and money and then leave a bad yelp review.

kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



I'm a bit tempted for my 3-bolt shoes, where full aft still feels a bit too toe-y for me:
https://bikerumor.com/2021/03/03/found-patrocleats-adapters-let-you-try-mid-foot-cleat-position-without-new-shoes

Serendipitaet
Apr 19, 2009


I pulled an older (2008ish) MTB out of storage. It's a nice enough bike components wise, but to my shame I never maintained it well. I want to use it more this season and hit some trails as well, so I'd be happy for pointers regarding some must-do checks and general maintenance steps. Or whether I should just get a quote for a full service/rebuild from a bike shop because I might overlook something important/safety relevant.

I already bled the front brake and it feels better, rear brake seems fine. I do need to clean it, especially the drivetrain is a bit gunked up. Looking at some youtube vids, they tend to completely disassemble the cranks and cassette. I have never done that and I don't have the tools for it, but I'm not averse to getting them.

Any other input would be welcome.

ExecuDork
Feb 25, 2007

We might be fucked, sir.

Fallen Rib

I bought a junkyard frankenbike 6 months ago and fixed it up enough to decide I prefer commuting by bike over the bus before the BB self-destructed (now the frame is hanging in my garage, some day I'll get back to it).

The Park Tools videos on Youtube are the best. Step 1: clean your bike, thoroughly. I didn't have a chain washer like in the PT video, but a rag and a dollar-store brush I could throw away when it turned black and gucky along with a generous squirt of dish soap into a bucket of hot water was all I needed to utterly transform that bike. The other major issues - shifting and braking - were solved by replacing all four cables (inner and outer) and blasting the internals of the shifters with INOX (WD-40's better Australian competitor).
Sounds like you have hydraulic brakes, which I know nothing about, but if the shifting is troublesome, again I suggest the Park Tools videos, and if that doesn't sort it, replace the cables.

eSporks
Jun 10, 2011



ExecuDork posted:

blasting the internals of the shifters with INOX (WD-40's better Australian competitor).
Quick Google shows INOX is a PTFE lubricant, so it should be OK for general bike use, but there are better lubricants.

Friendly reminder to anyone else reading that WD-40 is NOT a lubricant and it has no business being anywhere near your bike.

CopperHound
Feb 14, 2012



eSporks posted:

Friendly reminder to anyone else reading that WD-40 is NOT a lubricant
Except for when a specific product morphs into a brand with a wide lineup:

Voodoofly
Jul 3, 2002

Some days even my
lucky rocketship underpants
don't help


eSporks posted:

Quick Google shows INOX is a PTFE lubricant, so it should be OK for general bike use, but there are better lubricants.

Friendly reminder to anyone else reading that WD-40 is NOT a lubricant and it has no business being anywhere near your bike.

What about using it to do a quick degrease or get rid of water on the chain after you clean, but before you reapply lube?

bicievino
Feb 5, 2015



CopperHound posted:

Except for when a specific product morphs into a brand with a wide lineup:


I hate this and refuse to acknowledge it.

bicievino
Feb 5, 2015



Voodoofly posted:

What about using it to do a quick degrease or get rid of water on the chain after you clean, but before you reapply lube?

It leaves a tacky residue that you need to strip off with isopropyl alcohol or similar before reapplying lube.
It's just an annoying extra step, when literally just using a rag, waiting 10 minutes, and then reapplying lube is just as good.

Skarsnik
Oct 21, 2008

I...AM...RUUUDE!






Voodoofly posted:

What about using it to do a quick degrease or get rid of water on the chain after you clean, but before you reapply lube?

If you're looking to do that grab a can of GT85 instead, I use it all the time in the winter for just that

ExecuDork
Feb 25, 2007

We might be fucked, sir.

Fallen Rib

eSporks posted:

Quick Google shows INOX is a PTFE lubricant, so it should be OK for general bike use, but there are better lubricants.

Friendly reminder to anyone else reading that WD-40 is NOT a lubricant and it has no business being anywhere near your bike.
Yup, I used the INOX to un-stick some gooey crud interfering with the front shifter mechanism. It runs out of any little seam hole and evaporates, so the PTFE lubricant part of it must just form a thin covering on the parts. I was using it as a cleaner for 20-year-old shifters, not so much as a lube.

Voodoofly posted:

What about using it to do a quick degrease or get rid of water on the chain after you clean, but before you reapply lube?
My understanding is that WD-40 stands for "Water Displacement formula 40" and what you describe is pretty much exactly its intended use. Degrease, de-water, apply lube. But I have no direct experience of using anything other than dish soap in hot water on my bike chain. Wash, rinse, dry, lube. So maybe I'm destroying my bike?

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007

wacky cycling inflatable
tube man


Skarsnik posted:

If you're looking to do that grab a can of GT85 instead, I use it all the time in the winter for just that

GT85 is kind of the same stuff as WD40 + PTFE.

For degreasing purposes I'd rather use White Lightning Clean Streak, Finish Line Speed Degreaser or Muc-Off Dry Chain Degreaser because they're more or less brake cleaner and not penetrating oils.

Voodoofly
Jul 3, 2002

Some days even my
lucky rocketship underpants
don't help


Good to know.

FISHMANPET
Mar 3, 2007

Sweet 'N Sour
Can't
Melt
Steel Beams


So I'm working on rebuilding an old bike of mine. It's a cheap hybrid bike I got back in 2006 (a Giant Cypress ST). It's a dumb project to put any effort into such a cheap bike, but I really like the frame geometry, and I've wanted to learn more about the insides of a bicycle.

I was able to get one crank arm off with a crank puller, but the other was so stuck on that the bike shop needed a blow torch and some kind of giant wedge chisel thing to get the other one off. So already we're off to a pretty good start, everything is pretty seized up from 15 years of wear and I'm guessing no grease in these threads when it was originally manufactured.

So now I'm taking out the bottom bracket. It's a 20 splined square spindle so I've got the appropriate tool (Park Tool BB-22), and I'm taking off the non drive side first, turning counter clock wise. Problem is, the bottom bracket cup on that side is plastic, and completely stuck. So the whole thing has just sort of disintegrated as I apply force.

My understanding/hope is that if I can somehow remove or destroy that plastic cap, that then I'll be able to remove the cartridge from the drive side. I don't care about the bottom bracket so I'm perfectly willing to destroy it, but I'm not even completely sure how to go about that.

Having run back to my LBS once already on this I'd like to avoid it again if possible, but if it requires specialized tools (like, a blowtorch) I can have them give it a try. Any suggestions?

VelociBacon
Dec 8, 2009



Every single aspect of that bike is going to have issues like that with it - thanks for supporting your lbs! I'd take a punch and a mini sledgehammer and start trying to rotate the BB out that way.

Bottom Liner
Feb 15, 2006


IF I'M TALKING ABOUT ART, I'M PROBABLY WRONG, SO PLEASE REPORT ME SO I CAN BE PROBATED. AGAIN.




Can someone point me to the correct rubber hoods for my SRAM Rival brifters? It's a 1x11 and every set I've tried and the set the bike shop ordered for me aren't right, they don't have a cutout where the actual shifter engages so they end up just ripping from getting stretched every time I shift.

LUBE UP YOUR BUTT
Jun 30, 2008



Bought a new handlebar and only realised afterwards that the lack of external channel on the underside means I'd need to disconnect the hydraulic brake hose on both levers just to run them through that small section

Pic of the handlebar in question



I'm using Shimano R8070 without the quick-disconnects on the hoses. Any chance I can disconnect, route it through that small section without necessitating a bleed like in this gmbn video?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tzlOIhcBkak

I'm guessing manipulating the hoses through that channel would require a bit more flexing of the hose than in that video, is there some kind of seal I should attach to the lever end of the hose to stop fluid from leaking out in the process?

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Modal Auxiliary
Jan 14, 2005



Bottom Liner posted:

Can someone point me to the correct rubber hoods for my SRAM Rival brifters? It's a 1x11 and every set I've tried and the set the bike shop ordered for me aren't right, they don't have a cutout where the actual shifter engages so they end up just ripping from getting stretched every time I shift.

I grabbed these for my 2x11 Rival setup and they worked fine. Which ones have you tried?

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