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powderific
May 13, 2004



Grimey Drawer

I noticed my fork has a couple little dings in it along with a bunch of hairline cracks of some kind in the gel coat. This being the first carbon anything I've ever had, wondering if it's something I should be concerned about or just like cosmetic issue?

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kemikalkadet
Sep 16, 2012



Looks like marks in the laquer to me.

vikingstrike
Sep 23, 2007

whats happening, captain

If you tap around the cracks along the frame, does sound change much? Hard to tell really from a photo. Could easily be just cosmetic.

powderific
May 13, 2004



Grimey Drawer

Doesnít make any weird sounds that I noticed ó I suspect the dings happened when the bike fell over in the garage a while back and didnít notice till just now.

Edit: just heard back from Ritchey and they think itís probably just cosmetic

powderific fucked around with this message at 23:46 on Apr 7, 2021

ExecuDork
Feb 25, 2007

We might be fucked, sir.

Fallen Rib

New bell
New bike bell by Martin Brummell, on Flickr
The one that came with the bike was weak, I stumbled across this when I was ordering thread-recommended Rock & Roll Gold chain lube on Amazon. I had a chance to try it out commuting home after dark last night, it's loud enough without being an obnoxiously-loud angry noise when I'm trying to communicate a non-angry message of "please step to one side", not the "get the gently caress outta my way" that adverstised 100+ dB horns seem to be saying. I'm happy with my gold skull.

FISHMANPET
Mar 3, 2007

Sweet 'N Sour
Can't
Melt
Steel Beams


Can I use this plate to mount a kickstand?



All the pictures I see online of kick stand mounts involve screws going down from the top, this picture is of the bike upside down, so that screw goes up into the frame, but doesn't go through the frame.

VelociBacon
Dec 8, 2009



FISHMANPET posted:

Can I use this plate to mount a kickstand?



All the pictures I see online of kick stand mounts involve screws going down from the top, this picture is of the bike upside down, so that screw goes up into the frame, but doesn't go through the frame.

Yeah that's what that bolt is there for probably.

Voodoofly
Jul 3, 2002

Some days even my
lucky rocketship underpants
don't help


ExecuDork posted:

New bell
New bike bell by Martin Brummell, on Flickr
The one that came with the bike was weak, I stumbled across this when I was ordering thread-recommended Rock & Roll Gold chain lube on Amazon. I had a chance to try it out commuting home after dark last night, it's loud enough without being an obnoxiously-loud angry noise when I'm trying to communicate a non-angry message of "please step to one side", not the "get the gently caress outta my way" that adverstised 100+ dB horns seem to be saying. I'm happy with my gold skull.

Dope as gently caress

kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



VelociBacon posted:

Yeah that's what that bolt is there for probably.

It looks kinda small, like an M6, maybe? Should be an M10 with an 8mm hex head for a kickstand. I can't seem to find any that bolt up from below, but it should work if the threading goes all the way through the kickstand's base.

My guess, though, is that it's for holding a fender mounting tab.

VelociBacon
Dec 8, 2009



kimbo305 posted:

It looks kinda small, like an M6, maybe? Should be an M10 with an 8mm hex head for a kickstand. I can't seem to find any that bolt up from below, but it should work if the threading goes all the way through the kickstand's base.

My guess, though, is that it's for holding a fender mounting tab.

Yeah maybe or for SKUs of the bike that had routed cables there, to hold the plastic slider for the cables.

I still think it would work fine as a kickstand mount - worst thing that happens is the bolt breaks somehow and it's not doing anything else at the moment.

eSporks
Jun 10, 2011



You could probably get creative with a Greenfield (?those are the big standard kickstands, right) by drilling out the threads on the kickstands and using a bolt with thick washer.

Also. You don't need a kickstand, especially on a kids bike. They are just going to throw it on the ground anyways, and if the kickstand drops when they go off a jump it might make them crash.

FISHMANPET
Mar 3, 2007

Sweet 'N Sour
Can't
Melt
Steel Beams


OK, so I'd been staring at that plate for weeks trying to figure out what it was for. The thing that was throwing me every time is that all the kickstands I'd see, the plate on the kickstand ran from side to side on the frame, and that plate on my bike appeared to run front to back, or twisted 90 degrees from the way kickstands are normally mounted.

Well I don't know if I'd mentioned it earlier but I'm scavenging parts off a similar bike, that happens to have a kickstand with a more "standard" mount. I took that off, and set it on the plate on the bike I'm working on, and I realized (and it's visible in the second picture) that there are little bump-ups on all 4 corners to hold a kickstand plate in place. I put the kickstand in and it rubs on that derailleur cable there, but it sounds like you can buy adapter plats that will move it out of the way of that?

Also holy hell that bolt was seized in there, it's a 6mm hex drive bolt, but it's all rusted to hell. The kickstand I scavenged appeared to have a bigger (8mm?) bolt and actual threads in the kickstand. So maybe when you bolt down you're bolting through the mounting plate and attaching to the threads in the kickstand. My 6mm bolt fits through, so then when you're mounting from the bottom that threaded hole just serves as a through-hole and it "attaches" to the threading in the bike.

VelociBacon
Dec 8, 2009



FISHMANPET posted:

OK, so I'd been staring at that plate for weeks trying to figure out what it was for. The thing that was throwing me every time is that all the kickstands I'd see, the plate on the kickstand ran from side to side on the frame, and that plate on my bike appeared to run front to back, or twisted 90 degrees from the way kickstands are normally mounted.

Well I don't know if I'd mentioned it earlier but I'm scavenging parts off a similar bike, that happens to have a kickstand with a more "standard" mount. I took that off, and set it on the plate on the bike I'm working on, and I realized (and it's visible in the second picture) that there are little bump-ups on all 4 corners to hold a kickstand plate in place. I put the kickstand in and it rubs on that derailleur cable there, but it sounds like you can buy adapter plats that will move it out of the way of that?

Also holy hell that bolt was seized in there, it's a 6mm hex drive bolt, but it's all rusted to hell. The kickstand I scavenged appeared to have a bigger (8mm?) bolt and actual threads in the kickstand. So maybe when you bolt down you're bolting through the mounting plate and attaching to the threads in the kickstand. My 6mm bolt fits through, so then when you're mounting from the bottom that threaded hole just serves as a through-hole and it "attaches" to the threading in the bike.

Just wanted to second what esporks said - I would avoid using the kickstand if possible and I certainly wouldn't take the time to modify one to work or space it out or whatever.

Adult bikes (real ones) don't have kickstands - it's totally fine to just lay the bike down (we all do this with our expensive adult bikes), if the stand comes down and deploys it could catch the ground and toss your kid off the bike.

ExecuDork
Feb 25, 2007

We might be fucked, sir.

Fallen Rib

I'm a big fan of kickstands. I have no opinion one way or the other for children's bikes, but a kickstand is one of the first things I get for my bike. Yes, it'll be ok if layed down - but very often, there isn't a place to lay a bike down. It has to lean against something or sprawl half-down and into an unstable position, creating a minor hazard (plus being awkward and ugly). The tip of the handlebars is always tempting, but the front wheel will turn unexpectedly and the bike will fall. Many apparently convenient objects are really very bad ideas to use to support a bike, any painted surface (there are A LOT of painted surfaces around) is going to get scratched, many things are surprisingly flexible or fragile, it's just a hassle. Much better to kick the stand down. Obviously, if your riding is 99% in completely rural areas, just dirt roads and fences and hedges and cows, then yeah, toss your bike on the ground and do whatever. For me, I like a good kickstand.

I've never had my kickstand come down while riding. I don't hit the MTB trails particularly hard, but I do hit them and I'm trying to practice some basic skills so I do come down off of a few big rocks pretty hard. Again, no problem with the kickstand.

evil_bunnY
Apr 2, 2003



Dedicated road/MTB bikes don't get kickstands but everything else does.

EvilJoven
Mar 18, 2005


Fun Shoe

Kickstands are a godsend when you're hauling cargo either via panniers or a trailer but they definitely do get in the way when it comes to trail riding.

Safety Dance
Sep 10, 2007

Five degrees to starboard!


Kick stands? Center stands are where it's at (for both loading cargo and generally getting in the way).

Unrelated: My wife got a peloton and I'd like to be able to use it too sometimes. Unfortunately my left ankle is fused and gigantic and bonks into the crank sometimes. It's just enough to be irritating / mildly painful after a few minutes. Are there any spacers I could get that would move the pedals outboard by about 5-10mm? Alternatively, are there any long spindle LOOK Delta pedals I should be looking for? They use a standard 9/16" thread.

Edit: apparently I can just stack a few black oxide washers between the pedal and the crank arm?

Safety Dance fucked around with this message at 15:40 on Apr 9, 2021

FISHMANPET
Mar 3, 2007

Sweet 'N Sour
Can't
Melt
Steel Beams


It is hilarious how militant people get about kickstands. I've had this bike for 15 years (sans kickstand), it's a casual "hybrid" bike. For a few years I had another bike (that got stolen) that had a kickstand, and I enjoyed having that. It was also basically a requirement to have a kickstand when I was hauling my trailer, because if the trailer was connected the bike has to be upright. This is a heavy thick steel frame built like a brick shithouse, it's not a speed demon, it rides on streets and paths, a kickstand isn't going to slow me down or get damaged by debris. It's fine.

kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



FISHMANPET posted:

It was also basically a requirement to have a kickstand when I was hauling my trailer, because if the trailer was connected the bike has to be upright. This is a heavy thick steel frame built like a brick shithouse

FISHMANPET posted:

The kickstand I scavenged appeared to have a bigger (8mm?) bolt and actual threads in the kickstand. So maybe when you bolt down you're bolting through the mounting plate and attaching to the threads in the kickstand. My 6mm bolt fits through, so then when you're mounting from the bottom that threaded hole just serves as a through-hole and it "attaches" to the threading in the bike.

I'm not worried about your frame; I'm worried about the security of that kickstand-plate inteface. I'd probably get a washer under the bolt so I could torque it down more and really clamp the kickstand up. They probably spec an M10 bolt for kickstands for a reason.

a loathsome bird
Aug 15, 2004


Are spinning rivnuts on (cheap) carbon forks just A Thing or am I having terrible luck?

I ordered a Fyxation Sparta FCR fork and returned it for a spinning rivnut on one of the "3 pack" mounts, saw the State Monster Gravel fork with the same specs and a little more clearance so ordered that as a replacement and it has 2 loose rivnuts. Is this just par for the course in this price bracket?
How sketchy is it to use one of the many DIY fixes on Youtube using a long bolt and a washer to tighten the rivnut?

kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



a loathsome bird posted:

Are spinning rivnuts on (cheap) carbon forks just A Thing or am I having terrible luck?

I ordered a Fyxation Sparta FCR fork and returned it for a spinning rivnut on one of the "3 pack" mounts, saw the State Monster Gravel fork with the same specs and a little more clearance so ordered that as a replacement and it has 2 loose rivnuts. Is this just par for the course in this price bracket?

Only data point I can offer is that the earlier gen Sparta fork I ordered with 2 eyelets on the side had atrocious bonding for the threads. It wasn't loose but looked like it could break off. Fyxation took the return without any issue, but I didn't expect a replacement to look any better, so I gave up on them.

a loathsome bird
Aug 15, 2004


kimbo305 posted:

Only data point I can offer is that the earlier gen Sparta fork I ordered with 2 eyelets on the side had atrocious bonding for the threads. It wasn't loose but looked like it could break off. Fyxation took the return without any issue, but I didn't expect a replacement to look any better, so I gave up on them.

Not quite sure what you mean here- the rivnut is the captive nut that is compressed against the inside of the fork/frame right? From what I can tell they're not typically glued/bonded in unless you're fixing the spinning issue I'm having- what did yours look like?

kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



a loathsome bird posted:

Not quite sure what you mean here- the rivnut is the captive nut that is compressed against the inside of the fork/frame right? From what I can tell they're not typically glued/bonded in unless you're fixing the spinning issue I'm having- what did yours look like?

The picture I had must have through their support portal or something, cuz it's not in the email exchange I have with their support.
Iirc, the opening in the fork blade was pretty enough and not quite concentric with the threads, which were deeper-set that I expected, like there was a decent gap from the surface to where threads were. I don't recall mine having the rivnut type metal lip on the outside of the eyelet, but can't be sure.

gwrtheyrn
Oct 21, 2010

AYYYE DEEEEE DUBBALYOO DA-NYAAAAAH!


This seems like a more appropriate place than the general bike thread to ask this. I'm looking to build a bike from parts, and I'd like to make sure I'm not missing anything on my list. I know someone who has done a build, and I'll be able to use their tools. Their build was mechanical disc brakes and bar end shifters if that makes any difference, and they did not build their own wheels. This is everything I have on my list to buy--some things are TBD and I just have price placeholders on my spreadsheet.

Frame Assembly
Frame/Fork: Kona Rove
Bottom Bracket: SRAM Team GXP English Thread
Bars: Salsa Cowchipper
Pedals: TBD. Either some platform/clipless combo or I'll take the pedals off my other bike and swap those for road pedals.
Seatpost: Kalloy Uno
Saddle: WTB Volt, med steel
Stem: TBD
Headset: TBD. FSA Orbit MX?
Crown Race: TBD
Bar tape: TBD
Headset Spacers: TBD
Sticker: loving SRAM

Drivetrain stuff
Shifters/Levers: Apex 1 Hydraulic
Brakes: Apex 1 Hydraulic
Crankset: Apex 1 GXP, 42t 165mm, ideally 40t 165mm but I don't think a 40t crankset is actually sold anywhere
Rear Derailleur: Apex 1
Cassette: SRAM PG1130 11-42T
Chain: SRAM PC-X1
Brake Rotors: Shimano SM-RT64S
Lock rings: Whatever
Shift Cables: Shimano Dura-Ace 9000 Shift Cable Set

Wheel assembly
Rear Hub: Shimano 105 FH-R7070, 32H
Front Hub: Shimano DH-UR705-3D Dynamo, 32H
Rims: DT Swiss R470 32H
Spokes: DT Swiss Competition
Nipples: DT Swiss brass
Tires: Schwalbe marathon plus 700c x 35
Tubes: whatever
Rim Tape: TBD

Tools
Truing stand
Dish stick?
Spoke tension meter?

I think that everything that I'd need, but some of that is an assumption of what parts and fasteners come with what I'm buying. Also are factory new brakes usually ready to go out of the box, or do they typically need to be bled? I've got plenty of time before I can start since I won't have a frame for at least a couple of months. Is there anything I'm missing or any parts that are total crap / won't work together that I should switch?

gwrtheyrn fucked around with this message at 05:02 on Apr 11, 2021

sweat poteto
Feb 16, 2006

Everybody's gotta learn sometime

Frame will almost certainly come with the headset, probably an FSA.
The sram chainrings are direct mount and there are several vendors, race face aren't the prettiest but generally on the affordable end, also Wolf Tooth and others.
The shifters and calipers will come pre-bled and attached, but you'll probably want to adjust the hose length so get ready to bleed some brakes. A bleed kit is like $40 but it's good to have.
Any particular reason you're doing marathons and tubes instead of tubeless?
Worth getting a tension meter for the wheel build.

bicievino
Feb 5, 2015



gwrtheyrn posted:

This seems like a more appropriate place than the general bike thread to ask this. I'm looking to build a bike from parts, and I'd like to make sure I'm not missing anything on my list. I know someone who has done a build, and I'll be able to use their tools. Their build was mechanical disc brakes and bar end shifters if that makes any difference, and they did not build their own wheels. This is everything I have on my list to buy--some things are TBD and I just have price placeholders on my spreadsheet.

Frame Assembly
Frame/Fork: Kona Rove
Bottom Bracket: SRAM Team GXP English Thread
Bars: Salsa Cowchipper
Pedals: TBD. Either some platform/clipless combo or I'll take the pedals off my other bike and swap those for road pedals.
Seatpost: Kalloy Uno
Saddle: WTB Volt, med steel
Stem: TBD
Headset: TBD. FSA Orbit MX?
Crown Race: TBD
Bar tape: TBD
Headset Spacers: TBD
Sticker: loving SRAM

Drivetrain stuff
Shifters/Levers: Apex 1 Hydraulic
Brakes: Apex 1 Hydraulic
Crankset: Apex 1 GXP, 42t 165mm, ideally 40t 165mm but I don't think a 40t crankset is actually sold anywhere
Rear Derailleur: Apex 1
Cassette: SRAM PG1130 11-42T
Chain: SRAM PC-X1
Brake Rotors: Shimano SM-RT64S
Lock rings: Whatever
Shift Cables: Shimano Dura-Ace 9000 Shift Cable Set

Wheel assembly
Rear Hub: Shimano 105 FH-R7070, 32H
Front Hub: Shimano DH-UR705-3D Dynamo, 32H
Rims: DT Swiss R470 32H
Spokes: DT Swiss Competition
Nipples: DT Swiss brass
Tires: Schwalbe marathon plus 700c x 35
Tubes: whatever
Rim Tape: TBD

Tools
Truing stand
Dish stick?
Spoke tension meter?

I think that everything that I'd need, but some of that is an assumption of what parts and fasteners come with what I'm buying. Also are factory new brakes usually ready to go out of the box, or do they typically need to be bled? I've got plenty of time before I can start since I won't have a frame for at least a couple of months. Is there anything I'm missing or any parts that are total crap / won't work together that I should switch?

Seems like an aight list.

Deda Zero is one of the best value price/weight/quality stems.

Have you tried the cowchippers? They're... not for everyone.

I'd go with a canecreek 40 over an FSA headset if it's going to see any water or mud.

Wheel stuff:
I'd also avoid Shimano hubs if you're going to ride this in rain or offroad.
Do you really need 32h rims? They're really only needed for folks who are pretty heavy or for loaded touring, and both weigh more and cost more.
What kind of riding are you looking to do with this bike? I feel like the Marathon Plus is an odd tire to choose, but maybe it makes sense for what you're trying to do?
If this is your first time building a wheel, you're gonna want to get at least a cheap tension meter. It's not necessary, but it really speeds up the learning process, especially if you don't have someone knowledgeable looking over your shoulder.
Get a good spoke wrench. The Cyclus Profi (https://www.wheelfanatyk.com/store/cyclus-stainless-spoke-wrench/) is the absolute best one I've used assuming you're planning on building with standard square nipples.
What are you going to use for thread prep and threadlocker?
Overall... it's very weird to me that you're wanting to build the wheels yourself while doing a budget build. It's going to end up costing way more than it would cost to just buy pre-made wheels (or likely even getting them custom built by a local shop).

The Rove ST doesn't have anything internal so you don't *need* to bleed it, but if you have to shorten the housing you'll end up wanting a bleed kit.

What light are you buying? Do you have the tools to crimp the wires?

Does your friend have the tools to face the BB shell and brake caliper mounts?

Bottle cages?

You really setting up your gravel bike not tubeless?

kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



gwrtheyrn posted:

Crankset: Apex 1 GXP, 42t 165mm, ideally 40t 165mm but I don't think a 40t crankset is actually sold anywhere

You can just get a chainring separately, though that understandably eats into your budget. Also, keep in mind Apex has a bolt pattern unique to itself, with fewer aftermarket options.

gwrtheyrn
Oct 21, 2010

AYYYE DEEEEE DUBBALYOO DA-NYAAAAAH!


bicievino posted:

Have you tried the cowchippers? They're... not for everyone.
I haven't tried the cowchippers--I have tried the cowbell and it was fine but the chipper is significantly more flared. It's kinda up in the air and that's just what I put in. I haven't gotten around to going to find a real example because the whole everything is not open.

bicievino posted:

What kind of riding are you looking to do with this bike? I feel like the Marathon Plus is an odd tire to choose, but maybe it makes sense for what you're trying to do?
This is basically going to by my main bike for casually riding around and eventually commuting when I move somewhere that sucks less, though with the real estate market it's probably more of if now. Mostly on pavement and possibly some well maintained and fairly flat gravel pathways. I'm definitely not doing anything sort of racing. Basically it's taking the place of my current bike.

bicievino posted:

I'd also avoid Shimano hubs if you're going to ride this in rain or offroad.
I probably won't be riding much while it's actively raining, but would while the ground is still wet. Not in the rain does cut out a lot of the year here.
32h rims were because the dynamo hub is 32H and my understanding is it's best to match rim/hub holes and it's weird having fewer spokes in the back than front. I'm not sure I need the dynamo, but I did find a good deal on one. Do you have a recommendation on hubs that would be more weatherproof?

sweat poteto posted:

Any particular reason you're doing marathons and tubes instead of tubeless?

bicievino posted:

You really setting up your gravel bike not tubeless?
I've never had tubeless, and marathons are what I have now so that's what I put down. Are the self-sealing / lower pressure benefits that great? The main thing is I can totally see myself letting the sealant run dry since it's not a maintenance item I would normally think about

bicievino posted:

Overall... it's very weird to me that you're wanting to build the wheels yourself while doing a budget build. It's going to end up costing way more than it would cost to just buy pre-made wheels (or likely even getting them custom built by a local shop).
The budget excluding tools works out with what I've found in stock, at least new. It's $330 in hubs/rims/spokes, and everything I've found below 330 is QR and/or rim brakes. Custom builds are $90/wheel or $85 on universal cycles for labor. Using universalcycles's wheelset builder with the same stuff I have listed, it ended up being like $70 more--granted it will be less after including tools. This is more about doing it than cost at this point, since if cost was the issue I wouldn't be assembling parts

bicievino posted:

What light are you buying? Do you have the tools to crimp the wires?
Does your friend have the tools to face the BB shell and brake caliper mounts?
Bottle cages?
I haven't decided much beyond things that make a ridable bike. Is this something that needs to be decided before I have the rest of it put together? Bottle cages seem like they could be an afterthought, but will I regret not choosing lights before everything is put together (e.g. wires need to be run under/through things)
No idea exactly what tools they have. I would have to ask.

bicievino posted:

What are you going to use for thread prep and threadlocker?
I have blue/purple loctite for things that might need it. Not sure on greases / anti seize yet. I do have some around from when I installed some pedals last year.

kimbo305 posted:

You can just get a chainring separately, though that understandably eats into your budget. Also, keep in mind Apex has a bolt pattern unique to itself, with fewer aftermarket options.

I'll probably just get the 42T and figure out whether I even want the slightly lower gearing. Even 1:1 is still lower gearing than what I have now, so it will probably be okay

evil_bunnY
Apr 2, 2003



gwrtheyrn posted:

Tires: Schwalbe marathon plus 700c x 35
Unless you live in a true wasteland you'll be better served with supremes than plus. Modern marathon plus aren't as garden-hosey as a few years ago but they're still not great.

sweat poteto
Feb 16, 2006

Everybody's gotta learn sometime

sweat poteto posted:

The sram chainrings are direct mount and there are several vendors, race face aren't the prettiest but generally on the affordable end, also Wolf Tooth and others.

Whoops, not apex as Kimbo said. If you're not getting a complete group, I'd get a different chainset like praxis or Easton ea90 that take DM rings. Easier to swap and unambiguous compatibility.

vikingstrike
Sep 23, 2007

whats happening, captain

sweat poteto posted:

Whoops, not apex as Kimbo said. If you're not getting a complete group, I'd get a different chainset like praxis or Easton ea90 that take DM rings. Easier to swap and unambiguous compatibility.

Second this. The EA90 is a great crank, but you do need a tool to swap rings.

bicievino
Feb 5, 2015



If I were in your shoes I would get the Ritchey Comp Zeta Disc wheels or Fulcrum 7 DB, either of which gets you sealed bearings instead of the loose ball shimano hubs, and also gets you a well built wheelset without having to buy $300 of tools. Oh and they're $240 from bike24.

Edit: oh, and btw I misunderstood what you wanted to use this bike for. For general around town bike applications, I don't think tubeless makes sense for you unless you have a lot of issues with punctures currently.

I do think dynamos are rad, but having personally gone the route of trying to do it on the cheap, it was a very not rad experience. It's worth spending the coin to get a quality and reliable setup, or you're better off sticking with rechargeable lights, imo.

bicievino fucked around with this message at 15:40 on Apr 11, 2021

gwrtheyrn
Oct 21, 2010

AYYYE DEEEEE DUBBALYOO DA-NYAAAAAH!


bicievino posted:

If I were in your shoes I would get the Ritchey Comp Zeta Disc wheels or Fulcrum 7 DB, either of which gets you sealed bearings instead of the loose ball shimano hubs, and also gets you a well built wheelset without having to buy $300 of tools. Oh and they're $240 from bike24.

I do think dynamos are rad, but having personally gone the route of trying to do it on the cheap, it was a very not rad experience. It's worth spending the coin to get a quality and reliable setup, or you're better off sticking with rechargeable lights, imo.

Oh I might just do that. For some reason I thought the shipping cost would be a lot more than it is. I'll skip the dynamo for now then. Is it basically go up to shutter precision / Schmidt or don't bother if I decide to do so in the future? Or i guess the field servicable kasais?

sweat poteto posted:

Whoops, not apex as Kimbo said. If you're not getting a complete group, I'd get a different chainset like praxis or Easton ea90 that take DM rings. Easier to swap and unambiguous compatibility.
If Praxis restocks the 1x Albas, I might get that. As far as piecing things together, would the parts required just be the chainring, crank arms, and a spider if the chainrings aren't also direct mount? That and probably a different bottom bracket, and some bolts if the cranks don't come with them

Would getting a SRAM NX eagle crankset and getting a bigger ring also be a decent option? It's also direct mount and the crankset is less than cranks alone for praxis/raceface/easton, but I have no idea which of the direct mount standards are more prevalent.

gwrtheyrn fucked around with this message at 19:57 on Apr 11, 2021

kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



gwrtheyrn posted:

If Praxis restocks the 1x Albas, I might get that. As far as piecing things together, would the parts required just be the chainring, crank arms, and a spider if the chainrings aren't also direct mount? That and probably a different bottom bracket, and some bolts if the cranks don't come with them

It's uncommon to find a new crankset that was just arms and spider, without chainrings.
Wrt Apex 1 -- if you got that and wanted a different chainring, your surest bets probably Wolf Tooth or Absolute Black, but neither have any round ring availability in 40 right now.

sweat poteto
Feb 16, 2006

Everybody's gotta learn sometime

Praxis offers to include a bottom bracket with the chainsets they sell for like $30 and it comes with the installation tool.

Partial Octopus
Feb 4, 2006





What's the best way to get old dried sealant off of a tire?

Bottom Liner
Feb 15, 2006


IF I'M TALKING ABOUT ART, I'M PROBABLY WRONG, SO PLEASE REPORT ME SO I CAN BE PROBATED. AGAIN.




Magic eraser will pull it right off. Or just soap and a dish sponge usually. Usually you can just rub it and peel it with your fingers too if it's not too dried or stuck.

Bottom Liner fucked around with this message at 21:10 on Apr 11, 2021

bicievino
Feb 5, 2015



I would just go with the Rival 1x crank, imo. It's not that much more than Apex.

For dynamos - Shutter Precision is what crapped the bed on me literally one month after warranty, and then were lovely about service (essentially it was going to be more expensive to service than to buy a new one). SON is overpriced (even from Germany) but it's great.

gwrtheyrn
Oct 21, 2010

AYYYE DEEEEE DUBBALYOO DA-NYAAAAAH!


bicievino posted:

I would just go with the Rival 1x crank, imo. It's not that much more than Apex.

For dynamos - Shutter Precision is what crapped the bed on me literally one month after warranty, and then were lovely about service (essentially it was going to be more expensive to service than to buy a new one). SON is overpriced (even from Germany) but it's great.

It'd look weird to me, but I could use a shimano crankset right? They actually sell the grx 600 crankset in 165mm+40t. The apex has 165mm listings restocking soon but it's 42t. I haven't found any rival 1s listings in 165mm, even sold out ones. The crank arm length the main priority since I'm not even sure I need the lower gearing.

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bicievino
Feb 5, 2015



gwrtheyrn posted:

It'd look weird to me, but I could use a shimano crankset right? They actually sell the grx 600 crankset in 165mm+40t. The apex has 165mm listings restocking soon but it's 42t. I haven't found any rival 1s listings in 165mm, even sold out ones. The crank arm length the main priority since I'm not even sure I need the lower gearing.

Oh, that's super weird, but you're right. Never noticed that they make 165mm in Apex and Force but not Rival.

The GRX crankset has a different chainline than the Apex one - 49.7mm vs 45.5mm. I don't know whether that is enough of a difference to give you a lot of issues or if it would be fine.

I assume you've considered it, but going all GRX 600 1x has some positives for your whole drivetrain - the shimano hydraulics are much nicer to work on as a home mechanic.

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