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gwrtheyrn
Oct 21, 2010

AYYYE DEEEEE DUBBALYOO DA-NYAAAAAH!


bicievino posted:

Oh, that's super weird, but you're right. Never noticed that they make 165mm in Apex and Force but not Rival.

The GRX crankset has a different chainline than the Apex one - 49.7mm vs 45.5mm. I don't know whether that is enough of a difference to give you a lot of issues or if it would be fine.

I assume you've considered it, but going all GRX 600 1x has some positives for your whole drivetrain - the shimano hydraulics are much nicer to work on as a home mechanic.

Well they claim to make 165s in all 3 of those levels as well as 40t and in some cases 38T, but nobody actually sells most of the combinations. For the force 1, I only found like 50t in 165, the apex only really sells in 42t, and rival is 42t+ and no 165.

I did consider GRX but I got a deal on a set of lightly used apex 1 shifter/brakes so grx would be significantly more expensive. Is it mainly the difference in brake fluid that makes it nicer to work on?

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CopperHound
Feb 14, 2012



gwrtheyrn posted:

I did consider GRX but I got a deal on a set of lightly used apex 1 shifter/brakes so grx would be significantly more expensive. Is it mainly the difference in brake fluid that makes it nicer to work on?
When sram finally decided to let you close the hydraulic system without introducing air into the caliper they made up some special connector for it. It's called, I poo poo you not, bleeding edge.

Shimano just uses a normal bleed nipple like you would find on a car.

CopperHound fucked around with this message at 01:36 on Apr 12, 2021

bicievino
Feb 5, 2015



DOT fluid is a pain in the rear end to deal with compared to mineral oil.

Giant Metal Robot
Jun 14, 2005




Taco Defender

I was just looking up hazardous waste disposal with bikes, and now I'm just generally confused.

Can any of the following go in the trash?
Lube, degreaser, cleaning fluids?
Rags used to clean surfaces with those products?
Disposable gloves used to work with those products?

It feels like the answer is no to all three. But how do you collect degreaser? And do you dump all three of those categories into a metal can and then take them to an auto shop, or do you keep them separate?

CopperHound
Feb 14, 2012



Giant Metal Robot posted:

I was just looking up hazardous waste disposal with bikes, and now I'm just generally confused.
The first place I would think to look is the SDS, but they almost universally say:

quote:

Waste Disposal Methods
Dispose of in accordance with local regulations

VelociBacon
Dec 8, 2009



Giant Metal Robot posted:

I was just looking up hazardous waste disposal with bikes, and now I'm just generally confused.

Can any of the following go in the trash?
Lube, degreaser, cleaning fluids?
Rags used to clean surfaces with those products?
Disposable gloves used to work with those products?

It feels like the answer is no to all three. But how do you collect degreaser? And do you dump all three of those categories into a metal can and then take them to an auto shop, or do you keep them separate?

IMO if you have pools of this liquid in containers then you should take them to somewhere to have them properly disposed of (good luck trying to get an auto shop to take your trash for free), but stuff like gloves and rags and such (so long as we're talking about the small amount of product that you'd be using on your bike or two bikes) are fine to go in the garbage. Stuff like acetone or probably some very volatile cleaning fluids you have to be more careful with because they can ignite more easily than you'd expect if your trash bag ends up in the sun or something and you have it packed full of acetone soaked rags.

If you have some place that will take rags/gloves/etc then I guess do that, it's the best thing possible but I expect not super feasible.

jammyozzy
Dec 7, 2006

Is that a challenge?

gwrtheyrn posted:

Well they claim to make 165s in all 3 of those levels as well as 40t and in some cases 38T, but nobody actually sells most of the combinations. For the force 1, I only found like 50t in 165, the apex only really sells in 42t, and rival is 42t+ and no 165.

I did consider GRX but I got a deal on a set of lightly used apex 1 shifter/brakes so grx would be significantly more expensive. Is it mainly the difference in brake fluid that makes it nicer to work on?

I found this exact problem when I was building my gravel / bike packing bike, SRAM lists all these options as available but nowhere on earth sells them.

I ended up breaking down and buying GX cranks instead, because I was pretty sure I wanted a smaller ring than 40T and I could find them stocked in 175mm length. I'm now rocking a 32T ring which is perfect for my weak-rear end knees hauling stuff uphill, but means I spin out almost immediately going down.

evil_bunnY
Apr 2, 2003



bicievino posted:

For dynamos - Shutter Precision is what crapped the bed on me literally one month after warranty, and then were lovely about service (essentially it was going to be more expensive to service than to buy a new one). SON is overpriced (even from Germany) but it's great.
Isn't SON running SP internals? It's good that you're happy with them at least.

CopperHound
Feb 14, 2012



evil_bunnY posted:

Isn't SON running SP internals?
They are not exactly the same design:



It is not obvious, but the magnet for the SP hub is that ring in the middle. I imagine the longevity difference has more to do with bearing seals and condensation/corrosion prevention.



E: I just remembered I had done some testing with son vs. shutter precision hubs side by side with an oscilloscope. The SP- hub outputs a sine wave with an open circuit, but the SON hub puts out no-load voltage like this:

CopperHound fucked around with this message at 08:03 on Apr 12, 2021

highme
May 25, 2001


I posted my food for USPOL Thanksgiving!







How big is the crossover between people wanting to repair their bikes at home while enjoying Xanax?

Clark Nova
Jul 17, 2004



my impression was that SON is still made in germany, which is why it is like three times as expensive as anything else, and that SP gets sold under several brand names (like Kasai) but not SON


highme posted:




How big is the crossover between people wanting to repair their bikes at home while enjoying Xanax?


beer definitely helps the wheel building process but I can't imagine xanax would

VideoGameVet
May 14, 2005

It is by caffeine alone I set my bike in motion. It is by the juice of Java that pedaling acquires speed, the teeth acquire stains, stains become a warning. It is by caffeine alone I set my bike in motion.

After closer to 10,000 miles of daily steep descents and hard braking, I replaced the rotors on the Bacchetta Recumbent.

The old ones were warped and when I had the fork replaced the shop told me that the front one was dangerously thin (it was notably thinner than the rear).

I did the deed and as a benefit the BB7's are now adjusted for less brake lever movement needed.

Nice.

New:


Old:


Bike:

VideoGameVet fucked around with this message at 19:18 on Apr 13, 2021

ExecuDork
Feb 25, 2007

We might be fucked, sir.

Fallen Rib

Norco Storm 5 hardtail, purchased last November and ridden workdays as my commuter, plus a bit of the local MTB trails (green) from time to time. About 1100 km, mostly on paved MUP.

My rear tire is wearing much faster than the front. The central line of the tread is completely worn down, the tread to either side of the middle is lightly worn, and the tread further to the sides is not really worn at all. The front tire looks practically new. I'm not in the habit of skidding to a stop, locking up my brakes, or otherwise riding particularly hard, and I think I squeeze both levers about the same. I think the middle is much more worn than the sides because 99% of my riding is almost perfectly upright on smooth pavement, and the times I get a bit leaned over are mostly on soft dirt on the MTB trails.

Should I:
1. Swap the front and rear tires, keep riding until both are well worn down
2. Buy one new tire, the same as the front tire to replace the rear
3. Buy two new tires, using this as an opportunity/excuse to get some better tires?

When I bought the bike the employee at the LBS offered to upgrade my tires for just the cost of the tires, but I declined. Presumably that offer is off the table, which is fine, but I think they still sell both the same tires I've got (option 2) as well as at least one form of better (more expensive) tire (option 3). And, it's not urgent so if I should order a specific tire there's time to wait for that to arrive.

vikingstrike
Sep 23, 2007

whats happening, captain

Rear tires wear faster for everyone. Some people when in the situation you are throw the rear out, move the front to the rear and buy a new front tire. The idea being you want your front to be in best condition because of how important it is when riding. Tires can make a big difference in how your bike rides, brakes, and grips in turns. So should you upgrade? Part of this is a function of what you are running now, part is how much money you are looking to spend. If things are tight, buying one tire is certainly cheaper and you could even buy a nicer one if you wanted. “Nicer” here would be just better matching the tire to the type of riding you are doing these days over what the bike was originally built with by the manufacturer. What tires are you currently running? Do you have any issues with them currently? Like they are draggy on the MUPs or don’t give you much grip on the MTB trails. In general, you’d probably want to run XC tires that are fast rolling, especially in the back, with something a little gripper up front. Example tires might be a Bontrager XR1 or XR2, Vittoria Mezcal, Maxxis Aspens or Rekon Race.

Skarsnik
Oct 21, 2008

I...AM...RUUUDE!






Also you shouldn't be jamming both brakes on at once. Almost all your braking power comes from the front, so use that first. You may be locking up and dragging the rear slightly without even noticing

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007

wacky cycling inflatable
tube man


If your center tread is worn down in 1100km, then you are almost certainly not aware that you are skidding. I get more tread endurance out of skinny Corsa Speed time trial tires ridden at 40-45km/h. These tires are only 1.7mm thick inclusive of the tread and casing.

evil_bunnY
Apr 2, 2003



He's probably riding MTB tires on mostly pavement, which will do that.

VelociBacon
Dec 8, 2009



Yeah I've never had tires last anywhere near 1100km although I appreciate the riding is much different. I don't think he's skidding. OP try to find a more hybrid tire for the rear that is designed mostly for road/paths with a bit of trail use.

eSporks
Jun 10, 2011



I want to add that a proper hybrid tire will give you *more grip* than an a knobby MTB tire when used on pavement.

It seems counter intituitive, but the knobs are designed to hook up in loose soil, and/or to cut through the layer of dust on hard pack.

On pavement, you have neither of those issues, so you just want surface area. A smooth tire has more surface touching the ground than a knobby one.

VVVV whoops, I missed that.

eSporks fucked around with this message at 13:55 on Apr 15, 2021

vikingstrike
Sep 23, 2007

whats happening, captain

He says that he is riding green level trails too. I doubt he wants a pure slick. A tire like this is probably about as good as you could do in the back

https://www.vittoria.com/us/en/tires/mtb-xc/terreno

Bottom Liner
Feb 15, 2006


IF I'M TALKING ABOUT ART, I'M PROBABLY WRONG, SO PLEASE REPORT ME SO I CAN BE PROBATED. AGAIN.




Teravail Sparwood is my favorite mixed surface tire.

kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



The Surly Extraterrestial is designed as a mixed surface touring tire.
So durability is a high priority, and then grip for dirt and low rolling resistance for road. IMO, it's still pretty slow feeling, but would probably hold up very well.

ExecuDork
Feb 25, 2007

We might be fucked, sir.

Fallen Rib

Thanks everyone, lots to look into - I especially appreciate the specific tire names, great starting place. I have some reading to do. Plot twist: I'm in Australia, we'll see what's available.

Currently the bike is wearing WTB Starflight, though I can't find that model name from current WTB websites. Whatever, they were cheap.

I know a MTB wearing MTB tires is going to be slower than either a hybrid or a road bike wearing appropriate tires, but I'm happy with my riding speeds. My previous Frankenbike had new (and very cheap) road tires but the entire drivetrain needs to be replaced; moving from it to my new-but-not-top-of-the-line MTB I got noticeably faster. My cruising speed on most of the MUP is about 25-30 km/h, the fastest I routinely get is about 45 km/h on the big downhill and my personal speed record (when I glanced quickly down at my cheap little computer) was 51 km/h. Considerations that are important at 40 mph on a good road bike are mostly irrelevant to me.

evil_bunnY posted:

He's probably riding MTB tires on mostly pavement, which will do that.
Yup. I'll look for a hybrid tire (thanks again for the many suggestions everyone) and put it on the back. Party in the front, business in the back, my bike will be the reverse-mullet.

EDIT: lots of tires are listed as tubeless ready. I'm OK to stick with tubes, these tires will work with the traditional inner-tube setup, right?

ExecuDork fucked around with this message at 00:31 on Apr 16, 2021

Bottom Liner
Feb 15, 2006


IF I'M TALKING ABOUT ART, I'M PROBABLY WRONG, SO PLEASE REPORT ME SO I CAN BE PROBATED. AGAIN.




I spent the last year riding a mix of road/gravel/singletrack on knobby 2.6s and had a blast and I could still hold 20mph on asphalt with them. Don't overthink it. Fat front slim back is a fun setup and you'll cruise just fine.


Related; I just put some new Sparwoods on and after getting them seated and sealant in them rode 40 miles and they were fine. Woke up the next morning and they were completely flat and unseated. Pumped them back up and it happened again after about ~36 hours. Think they just need more sealant or maybe a retaping?

vikingstrike
Sep 23, 2007

whats happening, captain

ExecuDork posted:

Thanks everyone, lots to look into - I especially appreciate the specific tire names, great starting place. I have some reading to do. Plot twist: I'm in Australia, we'll see what's available.

Currently the bike is wearing WTB Starflight, though I can't find that model name from current WTB websites. Whatever, they were cheap.

I know a MTB wearing MTB tires is going to be slower than either a hybrid or a road bike wearing appropriate tires, but I'm happy with my riding speeds. My previous Frankenbike had new (and very cheap) road tires but the entire drivetrain needs to be replaced; moving from it to my new-but-not-top-of-the-line MTB I got noticeably faster. My cruising speed on most of the MUP is about 25-30 km/h, the fastest I routinely get is about 45 km/h on the big downhill and my personal speed record (when I glanced quickly down at my cheap little computer) was 51 km/h. Considerations that are important at 40 mph on a good road bike are mostly irrelevant to me.

Yup. I'll look for a hybrid tire (thanks again for the many suggestions everyone) and put it on the back. Party in the front, business in the back, my bike will be the reverse-mullet.

EDIT: lots of tires are listed as tubeless ready. I'm OK to stick with tubes, these tires will work with the traditional inner-tube setup, right?

Yes, you’ll be fine. That said, going tubeless especially if you do ride trails might be something to consider in the future.

VelociBacon
Dec 8, 2009



I personally think it's just more annoyance for someone that isn't going to be reaping the main tubeless benefit of very low minimum tire pressures. I run tubes in my DH bike in 2021 because I don't want to deal with sealant.

Bottom Liner
Feb 15, 2006


IF I'M TALKING ABOUT ART, I'M PROBABLY WRONG, SO PLEASE REPORT ME SO I CAN BE PROBATED. AGAIN.




The main benefit for me is worrying a lot less about flats while riding. Like significantly less. They're more work to setup but a lot less to maintain.

vikingstrike
Sep 23, 2007

whats happening, captain

Tubeless is also something once you get used to it isn’t that bad. Ymmv of course

Man_of_Teflon
Aug 15, 2003



just don't ever pump tubeless up to 60psi to make sure they are seated like I did, because apparently it can loving explode off and trash your rim and tire!

my 50c gravel kings also will not stop weeping sealant... I'm still mad at tubeless.

Literally Lewis Hamilton
Feb 22, 2005

#JusticeForBreonnaTaylor
#BlackLivesMatter
#StillIRise
#Blessed




Man_of_Teflon posted:

just don't ever pump tubeless up to 60psi to make sure they are seated like I did, because apparently it can loving explode off and trash your rim and tire!

my 50c gravel kings also will not stop weeping sealant... I'm still mad at tubeless.

What brand of sealant?

VelociBacon
Dec 8, 2009



vikingstrike posted:

Tubeless is also something once you get used to it isn’t that bad. Ymmv of course

I just get irritated thinking about the sealant going hard in my wheels while my bikes sit in my apartment between use. I know it's not a huge deal, you just add more, etc but I can't stop myself from going over and spinning the wheels all the time to move it and I just generally don't like the idea of having a mess inside my wheel that weighs not nothing when you keep adding sealant every season. Ehhh.

vikingstrike
Sep 23, 2007

whats happening, captain

VelociBacon posted:

I just get irritated thinking about the sealant going hard in my wheels while my bikes sit in my apartment between use. I know it's not a huge deal, you just add more, etc but I can't stop myself from going over and spinning the wheels all the time to move it and I just generally don't like the idea of having a mess inside my wheel that weighs not nothing when you keep adding sealant every season. Ehhh.

Good thing no one is going to come twist your arm and make you do it. If tubes work for you, rock n roll

ilmucche
Mar 16, 2016

Someone had to do it.

Hi, I know nothing about bikes and haven't owned one for like 10 years so I bought one to run around my town on. there are three gears in the front and it's having a tough time grabbing the largest one while I'm out riding, but if I flip it upside down in my kitchen it's fine. Are teeth supposed to look like this:




Also how do I adjust the brakes so the rear stops rubbing

Samopsa
Nov 9, 2009

Krijgt geen speciaal kerstdiner!


watch this vid for your front mech:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZNG7g83lI-s

and find the vid you need in this playlist for your rear brake:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLGCTGpvdT04Re5yrxKOVg1yjuollLGDwZ


and those teeth look used but okay, as long as the chain isn't skipping under load that big ring can be used.

ilmucche
Mar 16, 2016

Someone had to do it.

Ok thanks. Guess I wasn't expecting the teeth to look too used as I've only done about 40 km on the bike. Hoping I can get the derailleur sorted.

eSporks
Jun 10, 2011



Some of the teeth are intentionally shaped funky to aid with shifting, so some the wear you see is just that profile.

ilmucche
Mar 16, 2016

Someone had to do it.

Ok cool, thanks for the info and the videos. It'll be nice to have some idea of how to adjust things on my bike.

kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



ilmucche posted:

Ok thanks. Guess I wasn't expecting the teeth to look too used as I've only done about 40 km on the bike.

If you bought it new, the selling shop skulls be responsible for the shifting to be good when you receive the bike. But if it’s a place like Walmart, they wouldn’t know how to fix it anyways.

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ilmucche
Mar 16, 2016

Someone had to do it.

kimbo305 posted:

If you bought it new, the selling shop skulls be responsible for the shifting to be good when you receive the bike. But if it’s a place like Walmart, they wouldn’t know how to fix it anyways.

Yeah i took it back and they adjusted things up riding around the parking lot a bit. actually had someone competent this time around. She explained what she was doing too so I could mess around with it if I need to later, will still watch those videos though!

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