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hemale in pain
Jun 5, 2010






Salad Prong

kimbo305 posted:

Of all the places Surly decides to spare some metal...

seems a bit mad right? they sell them stock with sram SX eagle stuff so its not like this combo is unlikely

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Koth
Jul 1, 2005


Maybe it's so the steel hanger will bend more easily during contact to save your derailleur from damage? Like a contact cushion of sorts?

kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



On diagrams for hanger requirements, I don't see many places listing size requirements for the tab (or claw, as it's labeled in one place).
The radius of the round part of the hanger (about which the b-screw rotates) is 8mm or max 8.5mm.
Shimano has an old SIS standard diagram that recommends the tab stick out to 11.5-12.5mm (radius from hanger pivot)
On an older X5/7/9 spec diagram, the range is 11.5-13.5.

But even SRAM's Universal Derailleur Hanger standard doesn't advertise a size for its own tab.

hemale in pain
Jun 5, 2010






Salad Prong

Sooo i think i've found a solution. I can buy a eagle xx1/x01 parts kit which'll fit on to my NX and it looks like the bit which catches the tab is chunkier.

video is for an unrelated problem with the nx but shows all the parts https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mcnpBxeb4Nw

e: ugh, it's £25. gently caress it im just gonna ride it how it is and see if it breaks.

hemale in pain fucked around with this message at 00:20 on May 3, 2021

eSporks
Jun 10, 2011



Typically the contact patch there is just the corner of the b-tension screw. So like, I wouldn't stress it unless something happens, or it looks like it could slip.

bagmonkey
May 13, 2003




Grimey Drawer

Pooper Hero posted:

Are you using WD-40 with the steel wool? That makes it a lot easier and more effective.

Just did the rims tonight and this did the trick, thanks a ton! Got both rims done tonight in a reasonable amount of time.

Dren posted:

if you can soak them, this stuff gets rid of rust

Evapo-Rust The Original Super Safe Rust Remover, Water-Based, Non-Toxic, Biodegradable, 1 Gallon,Gray,ER012 https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00M0TLQ66

i think you can also apply it and scrub but soaking works best

I'm gonna keep this on my list to buy, I'm going to be finding a container to soak rims in to hopefully speed up the whole process. It's a garage bike repair shop necessity I'm realizing

Oldsrocket_27
Apr 28, 2009


Is there a term for chainrings that are fused to the crank arm on cheap square taper cranksets? The example I have looks like the chainring is held on by one giant rivet in the center. Out of curiosity, I've tried googling about every set of descriptive terms I can think of for them and I've come up with nothing.

kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



Oldsrocket_27 posted:

Is there a term for chainrings that are fused to the crank arm on cheap square taper cranksets? The example I have looks like the chainring is held on by one giant rivet in the center. Out of curiosity, I've tried googling about every set of descriptive terms I can think of for them and I've come up with nothing.

Like this?:

That's swaged.

Oldsrocket_27
Apr 28, 2009


Yes, that's exactly it! Thank you!

FISHMANPET
Mar 3, 2007

Sweet 'N Sour
Can't
Melt
Steel Beams


Any recommendations for a maintenance stand for occasional home use? Or a good inexpensive way to hold up a bike (like something I can mount directly to a wall?). The Park Tool stands are all too fancy and professional and expensive for the little use they'd see, but I don't want to buy some $50 piece of crap on Amazon that's going to fall apart in 20 minutes. There's got to be some kind of in-between.

FogHelmut
Dec 18, 2003

Your authority is not recognized in Fort Kickass.


FISHMANPET posted:

Any recommendations for a maintenance stand for occasional home use? Or a good inexpensive way to hold up a bike (like something I can mount directly to a wall?). The Park Tool stands are all too fancy and professional and expensive for the little use they'd see, but I don't want to buy some $50 piece of crap on Amazon that's going to fall apart in 20 minutes. There's got to be some kind of in-between.

I've had this Amazon one for a year and have hit things it was holding with a 5 lb hammer and it's still super solid.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B089QBLP6R/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_glt_fabc_Y43QVN16F9XVM20D935D?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1

kemikalkadet
Sep 16, 2012



FogHelmut posted:

I've had this Amazon one for a year and have hit things it was holding with a 5 lb hammer and it's still super solid.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B089QBLP6R/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_glt_fabc_Y43QVN16F9XVM20D935D?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1

Yeah these types are fine for most home use, they're sold under a million different brand names but they're basically all the same. I'd recommend getting one with 4 legs like the one in that link rather than the 5-legged ones that are fairly common. You can set it up by pulling apart two opposing legs which is easier and puts a bit less stress on them.

e.pilot
Nov 20, 2011

MR.FUSION
#TEAMTRASHMILES


I have a bike hand stand thatís really good

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00D9B7OKQ/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_glt_fabc_2GK3SRZKRR2ZX0T4WFKJ?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1

meowmeowmeowmeow
Jan 4, 2017


I have that one too and it's pretty good, not perfect but as good as a friend's parktool stand is

Literally Lewis Hamilton
Feb 22, 2005

#JusticeForBreonnaTaylor
#BlackLivesMatter
#StillIRise
#Blessed




Euro style front wheel stand for life

Voodoofly
Jul 3, 2002

Some days even my
lucky rocketship underpants
don't help


Itís been a long time since I worked on stem and bars.

1. Grease stem bolts or just blue threadlocker?
2. Grease bar at contact point with stem? Itís an aluminum bar no carbon involved.

vikingstrike
Sep 23, 2007

whats happening, captain

(1) I normally just grease and torque to spec but donít guess threadlocker would hurt?
(2) No grease, but will use carbon paste if carbon is involved.

EvilJoven
Mar 18, 2005


Fun Shoe

Voodoofly posted:

It’s been a long time since I worked on stem and bars.

1. Grease stem bolts or just blue threadlocker?
2. Grease bar at contact point with stem? It’s an aluminum bar no carbon involved.

You can grease the bolts but don't grease the stem. Assuming you have cartridge bearings in the headset take a moment to put some grease on them so they don't bond to the cups.

VelociBacon
Dec 8, 2009



Some thoughts

  • Lubricating bolts affects the torque specs (you're going to overtighten if you use torque recommendations)
  • If the goal is to prevent the seizing of bolts (not to lessen friction between moving parts like inside a bearing), you're kinda talking about using grease as anti-seize
  • If you're trying to prevent seizing as above, buy some good anti-seize (copper based pref) and use that instead of grease, it's the proper product for what you're trying to do and you can use it on stuff where it's much more useful such as automotive applications

Personally, I wouldn't lubricate stem bolts at all. The materials involved (steel bolts, threads tapped into an aluminum stem) are naturally quite soft, the forces involved are extremely low, and the area doesn't get heat cycled in any way that would promote seizing. The cockpit components (brakes, shifters, dropper control, grips) are typically fastened with such small diameter bolts that by lubricating them you're only going to overtighten to the point of stripping them accidentally.

I'm trying to think if I lubricate any bolts on my bikes and I'm pretty sure I don't. Bolts that I do lubricate (with anti-seize) includes car stuff like lug nuts that will be adjacent to the brake rotor, and other assorted large diameter bolts that get fastened very tightly that I don't want to fight the next time I remove them.

I don't think threadlocker is indicated for this usage either but it's not as big a deal IMO to use it, the 5mm bolts are large enough that you won't have issues removing them with even liberal amounts of blue loctite on them.

VelociBacon fucked around with this message at 15:01 on May 6, 2021

norp
Jan 20, 2004

TRUMP TRUMP TRUMP

let's invade New Zealand, they have oil


VelociBacon posted:

lubricating them you're only going to overtighten to the point of stripping them accidentally.



As someone who's ripped the threads out of carbon stems due to getting carbon gripper paste's carrier fluid wick into the stem bolts I no longer use anything near there

vikingstrike
Sep 23, 2007

whats happening, captain

I was working on bikes earlier today and checked and I didnít have have any grease on cockpit stuff, so sorry for bad info there.

I do use carbon paste though on bars and seat posts. (Edit: when carbon is involved before a goon flips there mind and misreads this.)

SimonSays
Aug 4, 2006

Simon is the monkey's name

Y'all are talking like people who've never had to remove seized bolts from a bike someone sweat on. Please grease stem bolts.

evil_bunnY
Apr 2, 2003



VelociBacon posted:

I'm trying to think if I lubricate any bolts on my bikes and I'm pretty sure I don't. Bolts that I do lubricate (with anti-seize) includes car stuff like lug nuts that will be adjacent to the brake rotor, and other assorted large diameter bolts that get fastened very tightly that I don't want to fight the next time I remove them.
Pedals are the only threads I grease AFAICR

SimonSays posted:

Y'all are talking like people who've never had to remove seized bolts from a bike someone sweat on. Please grease stem bolts.
Anti-seize will do that too without loving with the torque specs.

jammyozzy
Dec 7, 2006

Is that a challenge?

evil_bunnY posted:

Pedals are the only threads I grease AFAICR

Pedals and bottom brackets are the only things I put anti seize on, everything else gets a dab of blue loctite and it's worked out okay for me.

bicievino
Feb 5, 2015



I put grease on everything and have been for thirty years.

YES EVERYTHING

ElMaligno
Dec 31, 2004

Be Gay!
Do Crime!



bicievino posted:

I put grease on everything and have been for thirty years.

YES EVERYTHING

Partner on bed, giving you the fluttery eyes: "C'mon babe, im ready for you~"
bicievino: "Wait a second, I'm greasing up!"

ElMaligno fucked around with this message at 16:32 on May 7, 2021

Serendipitaet
Apr 19, 2009


I noticed my drivetrain is a lot louder when itís in the big ring. The noise seems to come from the rear derailleur. Google searching Iíve found people with similar issues but not really a definitive answer for the cause or resolution.

Basically I could repeat word for word what the op says here, except itís an 11 speed cassette in my case: https://forum.bikeradar.com/discussion/13012957/noisy-drivetrain-when-in-big-ring

New bike and new to cycling. Should I just not worry or is this worth going to the shop for?

e.pilot
Nov 20, 2011

MR.FUSION
#TEAMTRASHMILES


bicievino posted:

I put grease on everything and have been for thirty years.

YES EVERYTHING

kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



Serendipitaet posted:

I noticed my drivetrain is a lot louder when itís in the big ring. The noise seems to come from the rear derailleur. Google searching Iíve found people with similar issues but not really a definitive answer for the cause or resolution.

Basically I could repeat word for word what the op says here, except itís an 11 speed cassette in my case: https://forum.bikeradar.com/discussion/13012957/noisy-drivetrain-when-in-big-ring

New bike and new to cycling. Should I just not worry or is this worth going to the shop for?

If everything is new and set up, it's not anything to worry about. The noise comes from the particular combination of chain link shape, the angle the chain forms to the cassette when it's on the big ring, and the shape of the cog teeth.

Serendipitaet
Apr 19, 2009


kimbo305 posted:

If everything is new and set up, it's not anything to worry about. The noise comes from the particular combination of chain link shape, the angle the chain forms to the cassette when it's on the big ring, and the shape of the cog teeth.

Cool, thanks a lot for the reassurance and the explanation.

VelociBacon
Dec 8, 2009



You probably know this already but make sure you aren't crossing your chainline too much, IE being in the big chainring and the big cassette ring.

PolishPandaBear
Apr 10, 2009



This one also doubles as an awesome trainer desk if you clamp a small piece of plywood with it because of the cantilever.

hemale in pain
Jun 5, 2010






Salad Prong

hemale in pain posted:

I got a new bike but the integral derailleur hangar nob (no idea what to call that bit) seems awkwardly small



it's a surly bridge club and a sram nx deraileur. it's maybe fine but would like other opinions. i found that the sram bit comes in a spares kit so i could buy that and attempt to bend it over so there's more contact.

Just doing an update on this. We bought the b bolt kit for the xx1 derailleur.

NX - left, XX1 - right



Here's it on the bike. it actually fits!



close up of the old one



in conclusion gently caress you sram for making the cheaper derailleur poo poo and gently caress you surly for not putting more metal on the notch/tang.

hemale in pain fucked around with this message at 22:54 on May 10, 2021

EvilJoven
Mar 18, 2005


Fun Shoe

"gently caress SRAM and gently caress Surly".

Glad at least some things about the cycling industry are normal during covid times.

Clark Nova
Jul 17, 2004



is the nx part plastic?

surly dropout designs have always been kind of goofy

breaks
May 12, 2001



Having ridden a cross check for a decade I can assure you I cried when the Straggler came around and still (sort of) had those fuckin dropouts. With discs!!

On to a Black Mountain bike now and I do kinda miss the straight top tube though.

kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



Clark Nova posted:

is the nx part plastic?

Would have guessed steel, where stamping/ forming it is easier if you use bigger bending radius, hence being out of spec to the outside.

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hemale in pain
Jun 5, 2010






Salad Prong

It doesn't seem to be magnetic so I'd guess aluminium. It probably would of been fine but I would of never stopped worrying about a dumb failure out in the middle of nowhere.

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