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Al2001
Apr 7, 2007

You've gone through at the back


kimbo305 posted:

Only the rear wheel, though the rear triangle:

If they don't cut the U-lock, they can destroy the frame to get your rear wheel, or your rear wheel to get everything else.

This is the Sheldon Brown method, and it is pretty safe, imo. He used a mini D-Lock/U-lock. Because the lock is within the rear triangle, a thief would have to saw through the wheel to steal the frame, so unless your frame is super-desirable... Of course if you have a full size D-lock you may have room to go around either the chain-stays or seat-stays anyway.

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kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



Al2001 posted:

This is the Sheldon Brown method, and it is pretty safe, imo. He used a mini D-Lock/U-lock. Because the lock is within the rear triangle, a thief would have to saw through the wheel to steal the frame, so unless your frame is super-desirable... Of course if you have a full size D-lock you may have room to go around either the chain-stays or seat-stays anyway.

That's true. I didn't explicitly say that destroying frame or wheel was self-defeating for the thief, but I've I bumped it up.

Mauser posted:

Petition to add an encouragement to wear helmets in the OP with the caveat that it's better to ride a bike without a helmet than to not ride at all and maybe a blurb about fitting or recommendations and a disclaimer that helmet use derails down thread are probation-worthy.

I snuck it to the top of the equipment post. I didn't want to launch that debate off that bat, so bided my time.

kimbo305 fucked around with this message at 04:34 on Aug 8, 2020

alanthecat
Dec 19, 2005



Mauser posted:

Petition to add an encouragement to wear helmets in the OP

No. The primary use of helmets is as a victim blaming tool. Helmet shaming results in fewer people taking up cycling.

Wear one yourself if you like.

bicievino
Feb 5, 2015



A helmet is yet another item to accessorize with.

My helmet looks rad as gently caress.

Cugel the Clever
Apr 5, 2009

BLORANGE


bicievino posted:

A helmet is yet another item to accessorize with.

My helmet looks rad as gently caress.
This. It also keeps offers moderate protection against silly mishaps. Don't wear a helmet if you have to go out of your way to do it, but otherwise put that poo poo on your skull.

Sure, a helmet won't protect you against a sociopath in an F150 hitting you dead-on at 60 MPH and we need to destroy car culture, but overreacting to the bad faith arguments of the anti-bike crowd and going full "HELMETS ARE INSTRUMENTS OF OPPRESSION AND SHOULDN'T BE RECOMMENDED" is just bizarre to me.

bicievino
Feb 5, 2015



Cugel the Clever posted:

This. It also keeps offers moderate protection against silly mishaps. Don't wear a helmet if you have to go out of your way to do it, but otherwise put that poo poo on your skull.

Sure, a helmet won't protect you against a sociopath in an F150 hitting you dead-on at 60 MPH and we need to destroy car culture, but overreacting to the bad faith arguments of the anti-bike crowd and going full "HELMETS ARE INSTRUMENTS OF OPPRESSION AND SHOULDN'T BE RECOMMENDED" is just bizarre to me.

Oh sure, maybe, but look at this fuckin' thing.



Like, I'm struggling to think why someone wouldn't want to wear a sweetass accessory. I guess folks who don't want to muss their hairdos?

jesus WEP
Oct 17, 2004



Fun Shoe

bicievino posted:

Like, I'm struggling to think why someone wouldn't want to wear a sweetass accessory. I guess folks who don't want to muss their hairdos?
it me

Hadlock
Nov 9, 2004





I was not a helmet convert until I did an escooter and slammed head first into the pavement at full speed without one

I got lucky, only nearly bit through my upper lip, which healed in under two weeks. Had I not tens of thousands of bike miles under my belt. I probably wouldn't have landed as softly as I did

The big surprise to me is how poorly my meat brain handled being jostled about in it's fluid suspension. Imagine swinging your head into a concrete pillar in a parking garage. That's your head without a helmet in a low speed collision. Just give your head a light tap against a wall some time and see how that feels.

Anyways, would not recommend

I still don't wear my helmet 100% of the time, but I'm at about 80% now

TenementFunster
Feb 20, 2003

delinquent


bicievino posted:

Oh sure, maybe, but look at this fuckin' thing.



Like, I'm struggling to think why someone wouldn't want to wear a sweetass accessory. I guess folks who don't want to muss their hairdos?
drat it looks like that rad mystic paint they put on mustang cobras back in the late 90s too

bicievino
Feb 5, 2015



TenementFunster posted:

drat it looks like that rad mystic paint they put on mustang cobras back in the late 90s too

It's prolly safer than a 90s mustang tho

Coxswain Balls
Jun 3, 2001



I vividly remember my big crash on a descent and how my head skipped and ground across the pavement. No head or neck injuries which was a miracle considering I was going 70-80kph, and I wasn't mentally impaired in the slightest. I wish I could have kept the helmet as a keepsake, but I had to send it in for the crash replacement discount.

I agree that shaming people for not wearing them is bad though, and making them mandatory does more harm than good, especially among certain demographics. I'm certainly guilty of not putting it on if I'm just going to the corner store, but it's good to let people understand that the difference it might make can be life changing.

Mecca-Benghazi
Mar 31, 2012



I wish the infrastructure in my area was such that I didn't feel like I needed a helmet, but there's only one really separated bike path near me (two since they temporarily pedestrianized the downtown area until November) until you get closer to the city

FireTora
Oct 6, 2004



Helmets good, helmet shaming bad.

Helmets are too frequently used as a way to push the blame onto the cyclists and frequently the first thing you'll read in any article reporting on an accident involving a bicycle is whether the cyclist was wearing a helmet or not.



https://twitter.com/CathyTuttle/status/1120736768368631809


edit: To hopefully get off the helmet talk that happens too frequently in the bike threads. I just threw my VO rear rack on my old commuter finally to complete the look. What the gently caress is the point of a rear rack this size? Is it even usable beyond bungee cording a outer shell on?

FireTora fucked around with this message at 14:49 on Jul 31, 2020

CopperHound
Feb 14, 2012



You are still using those old stock parimoto's? How many did you buy? Are you still using them tubeless?

I miss how nice they feel. I might go to the panaracer branded ones as I replace my gravel kings and resign myself to replacing tires much more often.

bicievino
Feb 5, 2015



I like that bicheal.

I agree it's quite a small rack but it still looks big enough to put panniers on (although maybe too close to avoid heel-rub)?

e.pilot
Nov 20, 2011

MR.FUSION
#TEAMTRASHMILES


bicievino posted:

A helmet is yet another item to accessorize with.

My helmet looks rad as gently caress.

kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



FireTora posted:

I just threw my VO rear rack on my old commuter finally to complete the look. What the gently caress is the point of a rear rack this size? Is it even usable beyond bungee cording a outer shell on?


Most panniers with adjustable top latches should be able to fit that. No other reason than to be lightweight, I think.

FireTora
Oct 6, 2004



Yeah, my Ortliebs will hook onto it no problem, but my feet will smash into them. I have to pretty much slam them to the rear on my other one with a Tubus Cosmo to get any clearance. The small bags might work out though...



CopperHound posted:

You are still using those old stock parimoto's? How many did you buy? Are you still using them tubeless?

I miss how nice they feel. I might go to the panaracer branded ones as I replace my gravel kings and resign myself to replacing tires much more often.

3 or 4 sets I think, I've got one more pair still. Gave up on the tubeless since they seep so bad. I am going to get some actual tubeless tires after that though if I've still got the bike, so much less to worry about.

kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



FireTora posted:

Yeah, my Ortliebs will hook onto it no problem, but my feet will smash into them. I have to pretty much slam them to the rear on my other one with a Tubus Cosmo to get any clearance.

It's probably just not expecting a short chainstay. I've had some tiny rub with most non-touring bikes I've run panniers on.

ElMaligno
Dec 31, 2004

Be Gay!
Do Crime!



bicievino posted:

A helmet is yet another item to accessorize with.

My helmet looks rad as gently caress.

Just do Dazze cammo with reflective tape

XIII
Feb 11, 2009


bicievino posted:

Oh sure, maybe, but look at this fuckin' thing.



Like, I'm struggling to think why someone wouldn't want to wear a sweetass accessory. I guess folks who don't want to muss their hairdos?

drat you. I've been eyeing Abus lids a lot lately and this ain't helpin'

iospace
Jan 19, 2038




Effort post on winter commuting inbound.

My personal advice on winter commuting:

1. Studded tires are your friend.
2. Layers are also your friend.
3. You're probably dressed too warmly.
4. Avoid ruts in the snow from cars.
5. Keep those pedals spinning.

So, let's explain a bit.

1. Self explanatory. Helps you get traction on ice. They're not prefect but it helps a ton.

2. You can always take layers off and stuff them in your bag if you get too warm.

3. How do you know you're too warm? You're sweating. That runs the risk of cooling you off too much and hypothermia. It takes some trial and error to get the right balance of warm and cold. My usual rule of thumb is to go one or two layers lighter than if I were walking.

4. Those ruts are super slippery. Try to ride in the unpacked snow.

5. You're adding another gyroscope to the mix. Instead of just two, you have a third. Your spinning pedals aren't as good as your wheels for this, but it helps all the same. Trust me, your instincts will be to stop pedaling when you gotta focus on steering, but you'll notice the difference.

Others are welcome to chime in.

Some others' thoughts!

kimbo305 posted:

For slushy (but not frozen) conditions, I don't mind following the rut left by a car tire, especially if I can see the asphalt through the slush. The main benefit is not riding over something that's been completely snowed over, a pothole or sewer grate.

XIII posted:

My 2c: be chilly the first stage of your ride 'cause you'll warm up quickly. I've learned that having the thought, "I'm nice and warm," during the first mile means I'm going to be thinking, "gently caress, I'm too hot" before I make it to the office. Plus, a little crisp winter air wakes you up better than any coffee.

Invalido posted:

My winter riding tech tip:



If you ever have problems with freezing shifter cables, this thing helps a lot. It installs on the cable sheath (ideally at the lowest point) and allows you to spray your favourite water displacement libation in there in a matter of minutes.

spwrozek posted:

My advice (jokingly)

1) Move to Denver, What is snow?
2) If it snows...work from home and wait 1 day for it to melt.

Studded tires are clutch though.

Other thoughts:

Bike lights, Cygolite is the only way to go if it is USB IMO.

Aldantefax that 11 mile commute seems pretty chill. Shower at work, keep your clothes and shoes there, just bring socks and undies each day. I did 12 miles with more climbing for over a year before moving 1.5 miles from work. you should be able to cut that down to under 45 min if you don't have a ton of traffic lights to deal with.

iospace fucked around with this message at 00:31 on Aug 29, 2020

kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



For slushy (but not frozen) conditions, I don't mind following the rut left by a car tire, especially if I can see the asphalt through the slush. The main benefit is not riding over something that's been completely snowed over, a pothole or sewer grate.

XIII
Feb 11, 2009


iospace posted:

3. You're probably dressed too warmly.

So, let's explain a bit.

3. How do you know you're too warm? You're sweating. That runs the risk of cooling you off too much and hypothermia. It takes some trial and error to get the right balance of warm and cold. My usual rule of thumb is to go one or two layers lighter than if I were walking.


My 2c: be chilly the first stage of your ride 'cause you'll warm up quickly. I've learned that having the thought, "I'm nice and warm," during the first mile means I'm going to be thinking, "gently caress, I'm too hot" before I make it to the office. Plus, a little crisp winter air wakes you up better than any coffee.

Invalido
Dec 28, 2005

BICHAELING


My winter riding tech tip:



If you ever have problems with freezing shifter cables, this thing helps a lot. It installs on the cable sheath (ideally at the lowest point) and allows you to spray your favourite water displacement libation in there in a matter of minutes.

TenementFunster
Feb 20, 2003

delinquent


bicievino posted:

It's prolly safer than a 90s mustang tho
you canít get too dangerous if you accelerate slower than a modern-day camry

Development
Jun 2, 2016



XIII posted:

drat you. I've been eyeing Abus lids a lot lately and this ain't helpin'

buy

Screama
Nov 25, 2007
Yes, I am very cereal.

Admittedly I've grown up on a country where helmets are mandatory, but it absolutely blows my mind that someone would voluntarily ride any significant distance without one. I also have no idea why they're seen as such a barrier to people taking up cycling. It's not like they're difficult to use or very expensive.
I do see people riding around here (usually on those rented ebikes) without helmets semi-regularly so I assume the laws aren't enforced very hard, but the injury risk just doesn't seem worth the very mild inconvenience of having a helmet.

aldantefax
Oct 10, 2007

ALWAYS BE MECHFISHIN'

I'd like to begin commuting again to my office next year in Austin when I'll have moved to a new place. Same office, new residence. I haven't done it in awhile and the new commute will bring the one-way trip from about 4 to 5 miles with some uphill/downhill to about 11 miles (depending on routing). Google Maps says I have about 1 hr 10 min one way for the commute. I normally work from 11 to 8, so I have plenty of time off most rush hours, and even in the summer the ride home will be at or after dusk.

Question here is, is it worthwhile to save up for an e-bike with integrated lights to use for this commute? I have a Salsa Fargo and it's treated me well but the thought of 2 hours in the saddle on commute makes me a little weak-kneed, and also I had a rather embarrassing problem of running out of battery life on my lights. An e-bike, I think, would help with night-time commuting (integrated lights!) as well as getting some extra assist boost uphill and on straightways. I'll have it garaged with electricity at both locations, but maybe I want to also use it to make errand stops on the way to/from work and around Austin's downtown. Budget-wise, I'm looking at something like the Trek Allant+, so 6k USD would be around the target (with some flexibility).

(link: https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/bikes/hybrid-bikes/electric-hybrid-bikes/allant/allant-9-9s-stagger/p/30259/?colorCode=black_red)

In terms of "is it realistic to bike that far on a regular work night", I did do the other commute 5 days a week for several months before my work priorities changed pre-lockdown. I think I'd be comfortable with the commute once I got back into it.

bicievino
Feb 5, 2015



aldantefax posted:

I'd like to begin commuting again to my office next year in Austin when I'll have moved to a new place. Same office, new residence. I haven't done it in awhile and the new commute will bring the one-way trip from about 4 to 5 miles with some uphill/downhill to about 11 miles (depending on routing). Google Maps says I have about 1 hr 10 min one way for the commute. I normally work from 11 to 8, so I have plenty of time off most rush hours, and even in the summer the ride home will be at or after dusk.

Question here is, is it worthwhile to save up for an e-bike with integrated lights to use for this commute? I have a Salsa Fargo and it's treated me well but the thought of 2 hours in the saddle on commute makes me a little weak-kneed, and also I had a rather embarrassing problem of running out of battery life on my lights. An e-bike, I think, would help with night-time commuting (integrated lights!) as well as getting some extra assist boost uphill and on straightways. I'll have it garaged with electricity at both locations, but maybe I want to also use it to make errand stops on the way to/from work and around Austin's downtown. Budget-wise, I'm looking at something like the Trek Allant+, so 6k USD would be around the target (with some flexibility).

(link: https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/bikes/hybrid-bikes/electric-hybrid-bikes/allant/allant-9-9s-stagger/p/30259/?colorCode=black_red)

In terms of "is it realistic to bike that far on a regular work night", I did do the other commute 5 days a week for several months before my work priorities changed pre-lockdown. I think I'd be comfortable with the commute once I got back into it.

I don't think that's an unreasonable distance to be commuting, but there are a few things that would sway me one way or the other on the e-bike. Personally, I have trouble riding 11 miles without getting a bit sweaty. #goonproblems I guess. My approach has been to shower once I get to work, so it isn't actually adding time to my morning routine, just shifting it around, but for some folks that isn't an option. If you don't have the option to shower at work (or close by - I use a gym in the building), then an ebike could make the difference, especially during the summer.
The other constraint I'd be mindful of is if there are times when that 1 hour commute (I think you'd be able to get quite a bit faster with practice - that's the kind of distance that builds fitness quickly!) becomes a hassle for after-work activities. Having the option to go brrrrr and get home on an electric motorcycle could be the difference between having to drive that day, I guess.
I don't think anyone can tell you 100% this only makes sense one way or another - you're going to need to evaluate that for yourself (and the impact of that $6k cost). I'd suggest trying the commute route out now to get a feel for how feasible or challenging it seems - probably the best way to build confidence for tackling it under your own steam, or make you certain you'd prefer the ebike option.

All that aside, your desire for built-in lights is a good one. If you don't decide to get an e-bike, you can still get built-in lights in the form of a dynamo hub. It's a bit spendy, but nowhere near "new e-bike" level, and if you are a bit electrically & mechanically savvy you can save quite a bit.

Hadlock
Nov 9, 2004





I did a pretty flat commute in Dallas, about 3 miles, I was not super sweaty when I arrived, but I had to buy myself a fan for the office to keep myself from sweating once I got there. I also have abnormally not sweaty Scandinavian genes.

I think 12 miles is the upper limit for "this is fun, I can do this forever". I think as a casual, the upper limit is closer to 7, especially in Texas in August, unless you have showers etc at your office

With an ebike you can probably considerably extend those upper limits, I dunno how much, but probably by at least 40, if not 100%, especially when you start adding in Austin hills

I've always done USB rechargable led lights, they work great for me, your mileage may vary. What brands, style etc is a religious debate, up there with tire brand/model (Gatorskin)

aldantefax
Oct 10, 2007

ALWAYS BE MECHFISHIN'

bicievino posted:

I don't think that's an unreasonable distance to be commuting, but there are a few things that would sway me one way or the other on the e-bike. Personally, I have trouble riding 11 miles without getting a bit sweaty. #goonproblems I guess. My approach has been to shower once I get to work, so it isn't actually adding time to my morning routine, just shifting it around, but for some folks that isn't an option. If you don't have the option to shower at work (or close by - I use a gym in the building), then an ebike could make the difference, especially during the summer.
The other constraint I'd be mindful of is if there are times when that 1 hour commute (I think you'd be able to get quite a bit faster with practice - that's the kind of distance that builds fitness quickly!) becomes a hassle for after-work activities. Having the option to go brrrrr and get home on an electric motorcycle could be the difference between having to drive that day, I guess.
I don't think anyone can tell you 100% this only makes sense one way or another - you're going to need to evaluate that for yourself (and the impact of that $6k cost). I'd suggest trying the commute route out now to get a feel for how feasible or challenging it seems - probably the best way to build confidence for tackling it under your own steam, or make you certain you'd prefer the ebike option.

All that aside, your desire for built-in lights is a good one. If you don't decide to get an e-bike, you can still get built-in lights in the form of a dynamo hub. It's a bit spendy, but nowhere near "new e-bike" level, and if you are a bit electrically & mechanically savvy you can save quite a bit.

I work in one of those snooty tech offices around here so I do have access to a shower, and I'm not wholly un-familiar with bike-commuting. Usually I will stack a week's worth of clothes at work and shower (if necessary, usually not), towel, change, good to go. Once I actually get to the office it doesn't actually matter unless I have a meeting (which I would probably just try to take from home or block out as unavailable during that window), so the main concern is "getting there and back home" rather than the remaining other logistics.

The main thing is compared to my previous non-ebike commute I'm adding an extra 5 miles in both directions but I still have a reasonably big hill to climb and descend. This is a sample from Google Maps at what the new elevation profile is projected to be on one of the routes (they are all more of less the same):



This is what the return home trip looks like:



Since I'll be moving in Feb 2021 it'll be dark much faster and cooler in general, but even when I was biking in the middle of the day a couple years ago for my summer commute it wasn't that bad. I'm a big guy, so sweat just tends to come with the territory. I also will admit that the climb being heavy and carrying stuff kinda blew since the old commute had the climb on the return leg.

Hadlock posted:

I did a pretty flat commute in Dallas, about 3 miles, I was not super sweaty when I arrived, but I had to buy myself a fan for the office to keep myself from sweating once I got there. I also have abnormally not sweaty Scandinavian genes.

I think 12 miles is the upper limit for "this is fun, I can do this forever". I think as a casual, the upper limit is closer to 7, especially in Texas in August, unless you have showers etc at your office

With an ebike you can probably considerably extend those upper limits, I dunno how much, but probably by at least 40, if not 100%, especially when you start adding in Austin hills

I've always done USB rechargable led lights, they work great for me, your mileage may vary. What brands, style etc is a religious debate, up there with tire brand/model (Gatorskin)

I used Cateye and Bontrager Flair RT lights and even on that modest commute they had a tendency to crap out or I'd forget to charge em. One time I forgot and I was stuck in the dark on the way home on multiple huge hills and generally kind of lost in Texas Hot Soup Rain and it was around that time I was like "you know, this still beats driving, generally, but gently caress me and also this". Took me 2 hours that night to get home and it was a Wednesday. That was almost three years ago, and ever since then I had the general idea of buying an ebike with integrated lights.

A dynamo also sounds good purely for the lights, but I was also considering the pedal assist that an ebike can provide for those hills. I'd totally consider a dynamo if I wanted to go long distance for recreation.

bicievino
Feb 5, 2015



A dynamo is probably the purchase that has given me the most peace of mind on my commuter.

kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



I love the exercise, but I don't think I'd want 2+ h of commute and forced exercise no matter how I felt every work day.
Maybe if it was bike path 95% of the way. I'd consider road ebikes, given the distance.

Personal rec for an ebike is: https://www.karmicbikes.com/shop/karmic-koben-m

bicievino posted:

A dynamo is probably the purchase that has given me the most peace of mind on my commuter.

Yeah, I'd think about it even with an ebike, so that if the battery craps out, you still have lights.

spwrozek
Sep 4, 2006

Sail when it's windy



iospace posted:

Effort post on winter commuting inbound.

My personal advice on winter commuting:


Others are welcome to chime in.

My advice (jokingly)

1) Move to Denver, What is snow?
2) If it snows...work from home and wait 1 day for it to melt.

Studded tires are clutch though.

Other thoughts:

Bike lights, Cygolite is the only way to go if it is USB IMO.

Aldantefax that 11 mile commute seems pretty chill. Shower at work, keep your clothes and shoes there, just bring socks and undies each day. I did 12 miles with more climbing for over a year before moving 1.5 miles from work. you should be able to cut that down to under 45 min if you don't have a ton of traffic lights to deal with.

XIII
Feb 11, 2009


spwrozek posted:

My advice (jokingly)

1) Move to Denver, What is snow?
2) If it snows...work from home and wait 1 day for it to melt.


Then just bike in the snow, since it's apparently not up to your standard of "real" snow, you punk.

spwrozek
Sep 4, 2006

Sail when it's windy



XIII posted:

Then just bike in the snow, since it's apparently not up to your standard of "real" snow, you punk.

I mean I usually do. But if it is real bad then just bring home the laptop. Although now I work from home for....ever? who knows.

XIII
Feb 11, 2009


spwrozek posted:

I mean I usually do. But if it is real bad then just bring home the laptop. Although now I work from home for....ever? who knows.

I'm gonna bike to your apartment and throw snowballs at your balcony

bicievino
Feb 5, 2015



kimbo305 posted:

I love the exercise, but I don't think I'd want 2+ h of commute and forced exercise no matter how I felt every work day.


No, it honestly owns.

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Killswitch
Feb 25, 2009


Yea, the commute exercise is great. Honestly my mental health is suffering a bit these days with WFH, the daily exercise was really helpful and Iím too lazy to just ďgo rideĒ in the mornings

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