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learnincurve
May 15, 2014

What is this boring crap we're watching? Check if Antiques Roadshow is on




I do tend to launch right in when it comes to women and bikes, itís an actual problem in huge areas of the UK, like I do Strava segments and am the only woman to 200 men that week bad.

Why not get new super light rack for your bike and give her your old one or am I missing something here?

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Mauser
Dec 16, 2003

Weird. Very weird.
It's weird in here.


I still wanted to get her a lighter rack, but the difference between the Tubus one and the Soma one I ordered was like 1lb vs 1.3lbs. The rack on my commuter is old and if I remember correctly from the last time I took it off it's way more than 2lbs, so I wouldn't give her that. Maybe I'll get a super light rack at some point, but I'm pretty content with my current amount of bike crap

McPhearson
Aug 4, 2007

Hot Damn!





There's a main road where I live where the city removed all the parking spots and put in a bike lane instead, which is great for me and awful for the multitude of cars that were always parked there 24/7. The weird thing is in a few of the intersections they put signs and painted symbols saying bikes going straight should go through in the dedicated right turn lane:


Now getting in a right turn lane when I don't intend to go right seems inherently dangerous, and going into that lane when the light is red would make it almost impossible for any cars actually going right to make the turn safely. I'm inclined to ignore these signs/symbols and go into the right most (straight) lane for these intersections like I was doing before the bike lanes were put in, but I'm not sure what the best option actually is.

Coxswain Balls
Jun 3, 2001



Giant Metal Robot posted:

Is there anything like a good guide to rear racks? It's one of those things that everytime I buy one, a find a bunch of different designs, all capable of 44lbs, with more or less tubes, about the same weight, and anywhere from $30-$100. I have no idea why any of them are better than the other.

Steel is more expensive and usually heavier than aluminum, but it's more durable, can be bent back into place with less worry about metal fatigue, and can be welded with the most basic equipment. In practice this is probably only going to be a concern on unsupported tours where you need to be able to fix stuff after an accident; my aluminum front rack was toast after a crash and if it was steel it would have been super easy to fix.

Other than that it's mostly about what fits your bike and the stuff you're going to mount onto the rack without running into issues like heel strike. I won a porteur rack in an alleycat and while it's nice for groceries and take-out pizza, I prefer a lowrider rack when touring because I like the weight being as low to the ground as possible for long rides. The best way to figure out what works for you is to bring it to the shop and do a test fit to see if there are any glaring incompatibilities such as your disc brakes being in the way of the rack stays, and if you're going to need to be creative with bending your fender stays to get everything to play nice.

e.pilot
Nov 20, 2011

MR.FUSION
#TEAMTRASHMILES


McPhearson posted:

There's a main road where I live where the city removed all the parking spots and put in a bike lane instead, which is great for me and awful for the multitude of cars that were always parked there 24/7. The weird thing is in a few of the intersections they put signs and painted symbols saying bikes going straight should go through in the dedicated right turn lane:


Now getting in a right turn lane when I don't intend to go right seems inherently dangerous, and going into that lane when the light is red would make it almost impossible for any cars actually going right to make the turn safely. I'm inclined to ignore these signs/symbols and go into the right most (straight) lane for these intersections like I was doing before the bike lanes were put in, but I'm not sure what the best option actually is.

In situations like this I always pull all the way up into the crosswalk and split the straight and right turn lanes, so Iím not impeding right turning traffic and am out of the way of they donít see me, and can quickly dart back to the right when the light turns green in case the traffic going straight doesnít see me.

e: depending what the curb cut looks like on the corner sometimes Iíll just go all the way to the right if traffic is light

Literally Lewis Hamilton
Feb 22, 2005

#JusticeForBreonnaTaylor
#BlackLivesMatter
#StillIRise
#Blessed




e.pilot posted:

In situations like this I always pull all the way up into the crosswalk and split the straight and right turn lanes, so Iím not impeding right turning traffic and am out of the way of they donít see me, and can quickly dart back to the right when the light turns green in case the traffic going straight doesnít see me.

Same. This way the cars can turn right and not sit there blaring the horn at you.

bicievino
Feb 5, 2015



Mauser posted:

I still wanted to get her a lighter rack, but the difference between the Tubus one and the Soma one I ordered was like 1lb vs 1.3lbs. The rack on my commuter is old and if I remember correctly from the last time I took it off it's way more than 2lbs, so I wouldn't give her that. Maybe I'll get a super light rack at some point, but I'm pretty content with my current amount of bike crap

Yeah honestly I only linked the titanium racks because you said you wanted the lightest. It's not a good value.
The steel tubus racks are really good, though.

You'd think steel racks would be heavier than alu, but you can use tubular steel (ergo Tubus), vs solid alu.

Guinness
Sep 15, 2004



I spent like $40 on a Topeak rack that weighs a horrifying 100g more than the equivalent $100+ Tubus racks and my bike is literally unrideable. Don't make my same mistake.

100YrsofAttitude
Apr 29, 2013





Anyone know any good waterproof vests? I was wondering if fishing gear would have that?

It's getting warmer and my rain-jacket is starting to get too warm in these rainy spring days. I figure I'm ok with getting my arms wet, since I can easily towel that off, and a good vest will keep me generally warm, while not getting me too over-heated and sweating as much as it rains.

Koth
Jul 1, 2005


e.pilot posted:

In situations like this I always pull all the way up into the crosswalk and split the straight and right turn lanes, so I’m not impeding right turning traffic and am out of the way of they don’t see me, and can quickly dart back to the right when the light turns green in case the traffic going straight doesn’t see me.

e: depending what the curb cut looks like on the corner sometimes I’ll just go all the way to the right if traffic is light

Yeah, same. Unless there is a No Right Turn on Red sign. In which case I just sit in the right turn lane.

marshalljim
Mar 6, 2013

yospos


Giant Metal Robot posted:

Is there anything like a good guide to rear racks? It's one of those things that everytime I buy one, a find a bunch of different designs, all capable of 44lbs, with more or less tubes, about the same weight, and anywhere from $30-$100. I have no idea why any of them are better than the other.

Cycling About has a guide to the basics. He's got some reviews of popular models, too.

Unsinkabear
Jun 8, 2013

Ensign, raise the beariscope.







Hello, commuting thread! What is your recommendation(s) for bike headlamps?

Mauser
Dec 16, 2003

Weird. Very weird.
It's weird in here.


Like a lamp that goes on your head? If you're commuting, I think it makes more sense to have a light mounted to your handlebars and if you're riding through areas that don't have streetlights, like I've encountered a few times, having an actual powerful headlight on your handlebars pointed at the ground is the best way to go without blinding other riders or drivers.

Invalido
Dec 28, 2005

BICHAELING


My only strong opinion on headlamps is that unless the light is super weak it's important to get something with proper optics that project a light cone with sharply defined edges, and then adjusting it to shine low enought that you don't blind others. At least in Europe StVZO compliance seems to indicate such optics.

KozmoNaut
Apr 23, 2008

Happiness is a warm
Turbo Plasma Rifle


How much headlight you need also depends on how fast you like to go, since I assume you want something that lights up the ground in front of you, not just a light that makes you more visible to others.

I get by with one of these: https://smart-bike.squarespace.com/rl318, which is inexpensive, runs for a long time on a pair of AAAs and provides enough light for my relaxed commuting pace. That said, 0.5W is no slouch, it's bright enough to be blinding if you shine it directly at people, so it still needs to be aimed downwards.

Obviously if you like to ride fast, you need significantly more light, more than AA/AAA lights can provide. Never outride your lights.

E: Like with anything flashlight-related, the specs are almost always exaggerated, sometimes hilariously so. 10000 lumen light output from a handlebar-mounted light? No, that's never going to happen. Slightly sketchier/cheaper brands are really bad about this.

A company that I know makes good products (because I've got several of their flashlights) is Fenix. As far as I know, their bike lights are equally as good: https://www.fenixlighting.com/bicycle-lights/

KozmoNaut fucked around with this message at 09:03 on Mar 19, 2021

Groda
Mar 17, 2005



Hair Elf

Unsinkabear posted:

Hello, commuting thread! What is your recommendation(s) for bike headlamps?

3 W front dynamo hub + B&M Cyo Premium 80 lux

It's absolutely nuts how much light these put out, and they have a good beam pattern.

Mauser
Dec 16, 2003

Weird. Very weird.
It's weird in here.


Speaking of racks again, anything's possible if you don't fall down!







And before anyone asks, yes that's three gallons of milk and I will drink that all in a week with minimal contribution from my wife and she has absolutely brought this up to my friends

Giant Metal Robot
Jun 14, 2005




Taco Defender

marshalljim posted:

Cycling About has a guide to the basics. He's got some reviews of popular models, too.

I'll never have questions about rear racks again.

Now to figure out if a front rack is useful or style points.

XIII
Feb 11, 2009


Giant Metal Robot posted:

Now to figure out if a front rack is useful or style points.

Since my car is currently in the shop, I put my front rack to use for the first time since I got it a few months back and did my grocery shopping via bike this week. It ruled. Also, style points!

DevCore
Jul 16, 2003

Schooled by Satan

Mauser posted:

Speaking of racks again, anything's possible if you don't fall down!




Besides being disturbed by the milk consumption I love this bike and setup!

Do any bike manufacturers still make the classic 26" frame with modern features?

learnincurve
May 15, 2014

What is this boring crap we're watching? Check if Antiques Roadshow is on




If you are in the U.K. then the https://www.edinburghbicycle.com/bicycles tourers are just exquisite - itís employee owned and they do custom orders and builds.

Coxswain Balls
Jun 3, 2001



Giant Metal Robot posted:

I'll never have questions about rear racks again.

Now to figure out if a front rack is useful or style points.

I can fit so many pizzas on this thing

bicievino
Feb 5, 2015



Mauser posted:





And before anyone asks, yes that's three gallons of milk and I will drink that all in a week with minimal contribution from my wife and she has absolutely brought this up to my friends

Bro even your cat is giving you judgy eyes

Mauser
Dec 16, 2003

Weird. Very weird.
It's weird in here.


DevCore posted:

Besides being disturbed by the milk consumption I love this bike and setup!

Do any bike manufacturers still make the classic 26" frame with modern features?

Thanks! I got this thing several years back for $100 and just set it up for city commuting with some road tires and fenders. Had to replace the pedals because the tow clips were rusted on and were giving me blood blisters and the seat i had to replace because I was practicing hopping in the park and broke the front part. Luckily I found this beautiful galaxy blue/purple saddle to compliment the paint.

I see '90s rock hoppers for sale on craigslist all time and I still have the original shifters and chainrings on mine, which was admittedly sitting in a garage for 20 some years unused. You could always find one and get some more modern components installed if you felt the urge, unless you're looking for disc brakes or something. Alternatively, I've found my moderately priced modern steel frame 700c endurance bike to be infinitely better for commuting than this thing ever was in terms of comfort.

Koth
Jul 1, 2005


DevCore posted:

Besides being disturbed by the milk consumption I love this bike and setup!

Do any bike manufacturers still make the classic 26" frame with modern features?

Surly Troll. But I think they are going to discontinue it.

Invalido
Dec 28, 2005

BICHAELING


For the first time in my life I've serviced a shock fork that had a leaky dust wiper seal. I was a little intimidated but it seems to have worked out alright. I was aided by a good youtube and some new tools (a seal thwacking thingy, a shock pump and a tiny torque wrench). What I didn't have is a mechanic's stand, but I think I will treat myself to one before I carry out this procedure again. It should make it easier to not spill oil all over the floor if nothing else.

Since I now have derailleur gears on the primary commuter I've also experimented with a dry PTFE chain lube that had really good reviews at my normal getting place. It sort of works because there was no noise, but plenty of rust. I'll have to use oily lube until spring has sprung for real and there's no more salt on the roads before I try that again.

CopperHound
Feb 14, 2012



Mauser posted:

Speaking of racks again, anything's possible if you don't fall down!


This is a good bike. Take care of it and it will take care of you.

OMGVBFLOL
Dec 20, 2003


DevCore posted:

Do any bike manufacturers still make the classic 26" frame with modern features?

if 650/27.5, 1x cranks, steel frames, and hybrid gravel bikes are any indication, they will at some point, probably after the supply of used bikes and parts starts to dry up and they figure out the marketing angle they'll use to convince people this is The New Best Thing

SimonSays
Aug 4, 2006

Simon is the monkey's name

There's a few manufacturers doing 26" wheels to keep smaller bikes proportional, but it's actually getting more and more difficult to find OEM wheels.

kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



Cuz nobody wants to lace up disc hubs to 26 rims, right?


We're looking at getting a Thule Yepp Nexxt Mini front seat for our 12mo. Ok with the narrower age/size range for its compactness.
The clamp to go around the steerer seems janky but typically what you get in this class.
Any other recs?

evil_bunnY
Apr 2, 2003



Are you married to the idea of a front seat or? Yepp stuff is usually quote well thought out. The fidlok buckles are a sine qua non element on any seat I'd buy.

evil_bunnY fucked around with this message at 13:52 on Mar 21, 2021

kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



evil_bunnY posted:

Are you married to the idea of a front seat or? Yepp stuff is usually quote well thought out.

Not 100%. Just that it seems better handling, given how high rear seats are.

evil_bunnY
Apr 2, 2003



kimbo305 posted:

Not 100%. Just that it seems better handling, given how high rear seats are.
So depending on the frame front seats can be even worse. If you already have noodly behaviour from a typical step through frame, a front seat makes the whole affair worse.
I've always ridden double diamonds with a trailer or dedicated cargo bikes.

If you're worried about the high center of mass something with a 20" rear wheel or a front deck might be better. Something that'll 100% make your life better is a good double kickstand.

Leng
May 13, 2006

One song / Glory
One song before I go / Glory
One song to leave behind


No other road
No other way
No day but today


kimbo305 posted:

Not 100%. Just that it seems better handling, given how high rear seats are.

evil_bunnY posted:

So depending on the frame front seats can be even worse. If you already have noodly behaviour from a typical step through frame, a front seat makes the whole affair worse.
I've always ridden double diamonds with a trailer or dedicated cargo bikes.

If you're worried about the high center of mass something with a 20" rear wheel or a front deck might be better. Something that'll 100% make your life better is a good double kickstand.

12 months was around the time that we gave up on the front mounted Yepp seat (on a step through cruiser) and switched to a rear mounted seat (we have a Topeak on a Bike Friday tandem and a Hamax on the Orbea Katu, both bikes with smaller wheels). Mainly because they get heavier and heavier and so both handling and visibility get worse and worse (and they just keep growing faster).

And yeah, get a solid kickstand. A VERY solid one.

AfricanBootyShine
Jan 9, 2006

Snake wins.



What's the go-to for commuter tires now? I had gatorskins *years* ago and loved them. Iv'e got a dutch bike with some monstrous Schwalbe City Light 40-622 tires and I'd like to get some 32-622 puncture resistant tires.

I commute mostly on paved roads, but on trips into the city center I do have to deal with cobblestones.

Invalido
Dec 28, 2005

BICHAELING


Leng posted:

And yeah, get a solid kickstand. A VERY solid one.
This. It's been a good while since I had kids in a child seat, I used a rear mounted Hamax siesta. Handling was mainly an issue when loading/unloading, but I switched to bakfiets box before the kid in question got big. If I were to do it again I'd probably look into center stands.
What I liked about the siesta was the ability to tilt the seat back with the twist of a knob. She'd fall asleep more often than not when on the bike and a little tilt goes a long way to keep the head from flopping around too much. Although stupid heavy for what it is the hamax quick connect bracket around the seat tube worked pretty well and meant my wife and I could easily move the seat between our respective bikes which was useful at times.

sweat poteto
Feb 16, 2006

Everybody's gotta learn sometime

AfricanBootyShine posted:

What's the go-to for commuter tires now? I had gatorskins *years* ago and loved them. Iv'e got a dutch bike with some monstrous Schwalbe City Light 40-622 tires and I'd like to get some 32-622 puncture resistant tires.

I commute mostly on paved roads, but on trips into the city center I do have to deal with cobblestones.

Maxxis re-fuse are decent, come in 32 and 40c. For cobbles the bigger the better.

Edit: derp, thought the dutch bike was not the commuter. I'd stick to the 40c range at least, and yeah marathons.

sweat poteto fucked around with this message at 16:53 on Mar 21, 2021

CopperHound
Feb 14, 2012



AfricanBootyShine posted:

What's the go-to for commuter tires now? I had gatorskins *years* ago and loved them. Iv'e got a dutch bike
Does it have a full chain case that makes removing the rear wheel a massive pain on the side of the road?

I would recommend anything from marathon plus to panaracer pasela depending on your response.

kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



Leng posted:

12 months was around the time that we gave up on the front mounted Yepp seat (on a step through cruiser) and switched to a rear mounted seat (we have a Topeak on a Bike Friday tandem and a Hamax on the Orbea Katu, both bikes with smaller wheels). Mainly because they get heavier and heavier and so both handling and visibility get worse and worse (and they just keep growing faster).

And yeah, get a solid kickstand. A VERY solid one.

We're on a diamond triangle Trek FX, so wouldn't be as noodly as step through, but I'm sure it'd be noticeable still.
My wife and I are both long legged and hitting the front seat was my main reservation.
The rear rack has Wald folding baskets ziptied to it, but it might be slim enough to leave the baskets on.

We have a kickstand plate, so which two leg stands would work?
Also, do they swing back far enough that it's still the front wheel contacting the ground even with a baby in the back?

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evil_bunnY
Apr 2, 2003



Ursus stands are horrible pieces of poo poo so not that.

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