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Mauser
Dec 16, 2003

Weird. Very weird.
It's weird in here.


CopperHound posted:

This is a good bike. Take care of it and it will take care of you.

This is my "garbage" bike that I am extremely emotionally attached to because of the combination of old and purple. I spent like a month searching for a site that had that blue/purple saddle instock and I will eventually change out the pedals and handlebar pads with colors that I like better whenever they wear out.

In vaguely commuting related news, I went to the hardware store to get some dirt for gardening and bought two big bags, loaded them up in my panniers and then went for a ride around the lake and around the river park trail here. Roughly two hours of pushing it with a 40lb load was a pretty decent workout, but literally nothing compared to the six pullups I did on the exercise equipment around the lake park. Last time I did pullups, I could do sets of 20, but that was in Peace Corps when I was 35lbs lighter because of malnutrition

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Groda
Mar 17, 2005



Hair Elf

evil_bunnY posted:

Ursus stands are horrible pieces of poo poo so not that.

Hebie supremacy

kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



kimbo305 posted:

We're on a diamond triangle Trek FX

We have a kickstand plate, so which two leg stands would work?

Correction -- the FX doesn't have a plate; that's my Kogswell where I cannibalized the current kickstand from.

Leng posted:

12 months was around the time that we gave up on the front mounted Yepp seat (on a step through cruiser) and switched to a rear mounted seat (we have a Topeak on a Bike Friday tandem and a Hamax on the Orbea Katu, both bikes with smaller wheels). Mainly because they get heavier and heavier and so both handling and visibility get worse and worse (and they just keep growing faster).

And yeah, get a solid kickstand. A VERY solid one.

Switched to looking at rear seats, even though I think it would be really fun to see what the babb is looking at / doing as I ride.

Ordered a Pletscher 2-leg stand after seeing a couple positive reviews. It's the kind where both legs swing down from the NDS side, so lemme know if that was the doom choice.

evil_bunnY
Apr 2, 2003



Groda posted:

Hebie supremacy
Those are made better but not really wide enough. Good if you don’t have kids seats tho.

Leng
May 13, 2006

One song / Glory
One song before I go / Glory
One song to leave behind


No other road
No other way
No day but today


kimbo305 posted:

We have a kickstand plate, so which two leg stands would work?
Also, do they swing back far enough that it's still the front wheel contacting the ground even with a baby in the back?

kimbo305 posted:

Switched to looking at rear seats, even though I think it would be really fun to see what the babb is looking at / doing as I ride.

Ordered a Pletscher 2-leg stand after seeing a couple positive reviews. It's the kind where both legs swing down from the NDS side, so lemme know if that was the doom choice.

On the first, yeah, unfortunately this is both really fun for both bub and for you; my daughter used to love being on the front and she would ring the bell for us whenever we passed people and it was just a lot of all around. But on a good rear seat, if the kid's not smushed up against your back, they still get to see a lot. Now I do a lot of leaning side to side if I'm pointing out things that are ahead so she can see...it adds to the variety of the bike ride for her. Basically I keep up a running commentary on everything that I see, and now that she's older, I often get a running commentary back which is double and we can still play games like "spot/count the blue cars/dogs/birds/etc".

We have an Ursus Big Foot kickstand on the Orbea and a Pletscher clone kickstand on the tandem, which is by far the heavier bike. On the Orbea, the kickstand can be deployed and taken back up by using one foot to push down and then roll the bike back (I can do this easily by myself while bub's in the childseat), or by putting one foot down in front of the active stand, then just rolling the bike forward against the foot so the kickstand retracts. On the tandem, two people are required–one to lift up the front of the bike while bub's seated and the other to push the kickstand down/up. I can't imagine having it on a normal bike instead of a tandem would make it better, so I don't think someone small like me could manage it.

On your earlier questions, my husband says:

"Our Ursus Big Foot has less forward sweep than our Pletscher clone, so more likely to end up with nose down balance. But that makes it less stable when deployed as the kid grows/gets heavier. They all tend to sweep forward by design. Are you worried about wheel flop?"

All I can say is on both bikes, when the kickstands are down and our four year old is in the child seat, both front wheels are off the ground. This does mean the handlebars can kind of swing around which doesn't matter so much for the Orbea because the basket is attached to the front stem and not the handlebars, or our tandem because it's a long bike with nothing on the captain's handlebars anyway (though we are thinking of putting a front rack on it which would change things).

evil_bunnY posted:

Ursus stands are horrible pieces of poo poo so not that.

Yeah, getting it down and taking it back up are both kind of janky ordeals because it tends to bump around the bike (and the kid by extension) and I have run my own foot over a couple of times during the process. Would have been nice to be able to try a couple of other kickstands though at this point I'm just meh about it–it gets the job done, I'm used to it now and I never let go of the bike with bub in it.

Leng fucked around with this message at 21:29 on Mar 22, 2021

Groda
Mar 17, 2005



Hair Elf

evil_bunnY posted:

Those are made better but not really wide enough. Good if you don’t have kids seats tho.

I just upgraded from a narrower Hebie 0605 to a 0608, and it's a world of difference.

What did you have?

Invalido
Dec 28, 2005

BICHAELING


So my brother likes to spend money on geeky things and he's had one of these for years and probably never used it so he gave it to me because it was my birthday:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zqk6bENX0Hg

It's really nicely made and has a normal light too so it's not useless and I'm gonna give it a try but the laser seems pretty dumb tbh.

Animal Friend
Sep 7, 2011



Last week was very windy, riding home from work I copped some debris to the face and managed to get conjunctivitis.

Mauser
Dec 16, 2003

Weird. Very weird.
It's weird in here.


Jesus. I'm lucky that when I go riding or do some woodworking or whatever, I've always got some eye protection with my glasses if I don't wear goggles. I dunno what the treatment for that is, but I hope everything works out. good luck

Animal Friend
Sep 7, 2011



It's no big deal. I've had my immune system wiped out by medical malpractice and subsequent massive amounts (almost dependence) of antibiotics so this kind of thing is just the next in line. Just reporting in to the thread as I am curious as to whether its happened to anybody else. I have a forehead and brow a Klingon would envy so I don't normally notice glare and I have dodged a genetic bullet and wound up with good vision so I'm normally.... eyeball commando?

BTW Mauser your purple bike loving owns. A chance shot on a family friends' ancient Rockhopper like that is what got me back into cycling around after more than a decade of inactivity and mental stagnation. They're heavy by modern standards but they're so reliable and eager to roll

alnilam
Nov 10, 2009


Posting in the springtime


Any recommendations for some light waterproof gloves to wear when it's like 40s-50s and rainy? I'm tired of my "water resistant" softshell gloves soaking through and becoming painfully cold.

evil_bunnY
Apr 2, 2003



Groda posted:

I just upgraded from a narrower Hebie 0605 to a 0608, and it's a world of difference.
What did you have?
None, but I've ridden a postman-style bike with a narrow hebie and it was fine. The original stand on the Tern GSD looked very much like the 0608 and was a piece of poo poo, but I'm quite sure it wasn't an actual Hebie

Asperity
Jun 7, 2011


alnilam posted:

Any recommendations for some light waterproof gloves to wear when it's like 40s-50s and rainy? I'm tired of my "water resistant" softshell gloves soaking through and becoming painfully cold.

The Showers Pass knit waterproof gloves are good at keeping hands dry and are fairly comfortable. I think there is somehow an older version of them slightly cheaper?

100YrsofAttitude
Apr 29, 2013





I'm thinking of getting a new helmet. The one I've used since September is a 20 euro Declathon thing that we got because we didn't know what to get. I... don't feel particular secure in it and should probably invest in something better. My route is generally safe, though I'm tossed out on a road in a few instances for some 100m+ or so. Looking at the Helmet Guide on the first page I'm a touch overwhelmed. Any suggestions?

Judging by price some of things I've seen by Bern (specifically the MACON 2.0) seem ok, but maybe in utility they're no different than what I'm using? Breathability is big for me since I have a rather thick mat of hair that over-heats me needlessly otherwise.

kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



100YrsofAttitude posted:

Looking at the Helmet Guide on the first page I'm a touch overwhelmed. Any suggestions?

Judging by price some of things I've seen by Bern (specifically the MACON 2.0) seem ok, but maybe in utility they're no different than what I'm using? Breathability is big for me since I have a rather thick mat of hair that over-heats me needlessly otherwise.

You can't really know for sure without riding, for two reasons:
- the angle at which you keep your head affects how air flows into the vents. Head shape presumably matters, but to a smaller degree. I know one helmet where I vehemently disagree with another owner on ventilation (fine for me, miserable for the other person)
- size / comfort past the first few minutes

If you have to buy blind, go down this list:
https://www.helmet.beam.vt.edu/bicycle-helmet-ratings.html
Google reviews for how well they're vented, and study the size charts and shape comments (the usually missing part of any helmet review).

quote:

The one I've used since September is a 20 euro Declathon thing that we got because we didn't know what to get. I... don't feel particular secure in it
Is it just perception of the cost correlated with quality, or have you noticed specific issues with it?

100YrsofAttitude
Apr 29, 2013





kimbo305 posted:

Is it just perception of the cost correlated with quality, or have you noticed specific issues with it?

Partly the former as it feels rather flimsy, partly the fact that it's rather loose and it doesn't stay tight for long, as the straps/buckles aren't very good. Otherwise, I guess it's fine?

Mauser
Dec 16, 2003

Weird. Very weird.
It's weird in here.


Animal Friend posted:

It's no big deal. I've had my immune system wiped out by medical malpractice and subsequent massive amounts (almost dependence) of antibiotics so this kind of thing is just the next in line. Just reporting in to the thread as I am curious as to whether its happened to anybody else. I have a forehead and brow a Klingon would envy so I don't normally notice glare and I have dodged a genetic bullet and wound up with good vision so I'm normally.... eyeball commando?

BTW Mauser your purple bike loving owns. A chance shot on a family friends' ancient Rockhopper like that is what got me back into cycling around after more than a decade of inactivity and mental stagnation. They're heavy by modern standards but they're so reliable and eager to roll

That's good to hear, I think! This thing got me back into it as well and the extra weight definitely turned my leg muscles into rocks. It's also survived a couple accidents with cars, intentionally getting run off the road by a car, me just falling over for no reason and tons of bumps in the road. Still solid as hell.

100YrsofAttitude
Apr 29, 2013





So the assistant principal took me aside to tell me people were unhappy with my use of a radiator in the teacher's room to dry off wet clothes, wet from rain or sweat depending on the day. Personally it was never my first choice and I was more ashamed about having to do that more than anything else. I tried to be discreet by putting my stuff between the wall and the radiator best I could but well there we are.

We don't have a locker room or anything where I could air out my stuff otherwise so I'm probably going to just have to bring an extra set of shorts and t-shirt. One for the morning and one for the afternoon or just ride in sweaty smelly clothes on the way home after they've been folded best they can into a bag rather than being hung out to dry.

Anyway I don't blame the assistant principal. He's a good guy, I'm just more annoyed at people not telling me directly. I would've changed my habits either way, but I want them to understand that I'm not doing it because I'm gross or out of spite and that it bothered me immensely to do it to begin with. That's my commuting story for the day.

bicievino
Feb 5, 2015



100YrsofAttitude posted:

So the assistant principal took me aside to tell me people were unhappy with my use of a radiator in the teacher's room to dry off wet clothes, wet from rain or sweat depending on the day. Personally it was never my first choice and I was more ashamed about having to do that more than anything else. I tried to be discreet by putting my stuff between the wall and the radiator best I could but well there we are.

We don't have a locker room or anything where I could air out my stuff otherwise so I'm probably going to just have to bring an extra set of shorts and t-shirt. One for the morning and one for the afternoon or just ride in sweaty smelly clothes on the way home after they've been folded best they can into a bag rather than being hung out to dry.

Anyway I don't blame the assistant principal. He's a good guy, I'm just more annoyed at people not telling me directly. I would've changed my habits either way, but I want them to understand that I'm not doing it because I'm gross or out of spite and that it bothered me immensely to do it to begin with. That's my commuting story for the day.

When I was in high school I would hang up my bibs and jersey in my locker to "air out".
It didn't loving work at all, it just made the locker stink, but I was a gross highschool boy surrounded by other gross highschool boys so it mostly went unremarked.

It's lame that you don't have anywhere that they can let you air things out between commutes, but yeah, you're prolly just gonna have to bring a spare set of clothes for the ride home.

Safety Dance
Sep 10, 2007

Five degrees to starboard!


100YrsofAttitude posted:

Partly the former as it feels rather flimsy, partly the fact that it's rather loose and it doesn't stay tight for long, as the straps/buckles aren't very good. Otherwise, I guess it's fine?

It shouldn't be loose, and the straps should keep it pretty well retained. It's definitely worth replacing. If you can go into an actual shop and try a helmet on to see how it fits (I realize that might be hard right now), that's the best option.

Leng
May 13, 2006

One song / Glory
One song before I go / Glory
One song to leave behind


No other road
No other way
No day but today


Was planning to come in and tell this thread all about how much fun we had riding as a family on our tandem to a local bakery to get some Portugese tarts, except on our way back home we saw a guy riding a tall bike as part of his normal, everyday, going around town doing errands business.

I wish I had photos to post because it was the tallest thing on the road at that moment. Unfortunately we were riding north on the footpath and he jay-rode his bike off the curb on the west side of the road to cut into the southbound lane during a lull in the traffic so we had about 2 seconds of reaction time where my husband shouted "look, a tall bike!" and I whooped in excitement before we were well past and he was gone.

It looked like this, but bright blue:

Invalido
Dec 28, 2005

BICHAELING


Leng posted:

Was planning to come in and tell this thread all about how much fun we had riding as a family on our tandem to a local bakery to get some Portugese tarts, except on our way back home we saw a guy riding a tall bike as part of his normal, everyday, going around town doing errands business.

I wish I had photos to post because it was the tallest thing on the road at that moment. Unfortunately we were riding north on the footpath and he jay-rode his bike off the curb on the west side of the road to cut into the southbound lane during a lull in the traffic so we had about 2 seconds of reaction time where my husband shouted "look, a tall bike!" and I whooped in excitement before we were well past and he was gone.

It looked like this, but bright blue:



I rode a borrowed tall bike around for a day a decade ago or so. It looked a lot like that one in the picture, build by welding two normal frames together on top of one another pretty much. It was lots of fun, surprisingly easy to ride in most situations and not super impractical. You see really well and they are stable at slow speeds and can keep up with other bike traffic, but there better be a lightpost or something to grab when you need to stop or it's a bit of a hassle. The main problem was that it tended to flip over backwards really easily - you can see how the saddle is right above the rear hub. I'm toying with the idea of building one since I need a new metal working hobby project, but if I do it I'll try going for a longer wheelbase to prevent that from happening.

kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



Can’t you just sacrifice some strength and weld the top frame more forward?

CopperHound
Feb 14, 2012



kimbo305 posted:

Can’t you just sacrifice some strength and weld the top frame more forward?
That would require a steering linkage. If you are getting that complicated, you may as well make the bottom part longer.

kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



CopperHound posted:

That would require a steering linkage. If you are getting that complicated, you may as well make the bottom part longer.

Perhaps two very differently sized frames?

CopperHound
Feb 14, 2012



Let me introduce the small tall

CopperHound fucked around with this message at 18:09 on Mar 27, 2021

Invalido
Dec 28, 2005

BICHAELING


This one looks like it would rule for doing actual bike stuff, only taller.

kimbo305
Jun 9, 2007

He is I, and I am him



Invalido posted:

This one looks like it would rule for doing actual bike stuff, only taller.


Imagine getting your brakes pulled by a crosswind.

OMGVBFLOL
Dec 20, 2003


having broken bones falling from shortbikes, i have never had much desire to try tallbikes

Anachronist
Feb 13, 2009




Those brake cable runs are maybe the best part about that absurd creation.

VideoGameVet
May 14, 2005

It is by caffeine alone I set my bike in motion. It is by the juice of Java that pedaling acquires speed, the teeth acquire stains, stains become a warning. It is by caffeine alone I set my bike in motion.

Anachronist posted:

Those brake cable runs are maybe the best part about that absurd creation.

... and the apparently broken-in Brooks saddle.

Mauser
Dec 16, 2003

Weird. Very weird.
It's weird in here.


I'm assuming you could dismount by throwing a leg over while it's still moving and stepping down that way, right?

alnilam
Nov 10, 2009


Posting in the springtime


Mauser posted:

I'm assuming you could dismount by throwing a leg over while it's still moving and stepping down that way, right?

Yeah that's the basic idea. Don't wanna get caught stopping short though.

Literally Lewis Hamilton
Feb 22, 2005

#JusticeForBreonnaTaylor
#BlackLivesMatter
#StillIRise
#Blessed




Should just use the lower BB and put a peg or similar in it to help get up and down.

Animal Friend
Sep 7, 2011



Just bring back the Penny Farthing imo.

How did they stop those?

SimonSays
Aug 4, 2006

Simon is the monkey's name

Animal Friend posted:

Just bring back the Penny Farthing imo.

How did they stop those?

Lithobraking

Animal Friend
Sep 7, 2011



SimonSays posted:

Lithobraking

lol no kidding. just checking the wikipedia page for them.

"On long downhills, some riders hooked their feet over the handlebars. This made for quick descents but left no chance of stopping."

evil_bunnY
Apr 2, 2003



SimonSays posted:

Lithobraking

lmao

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007

wacky cycling inflatable
tube man


Animal Friend posted:

Just bring back the Penny Farthing imo.

How did they stop those?


Death. Ted Shred. Bionic knees.

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Animal Friend
Sep 7, 2011



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