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Ccs
Feb 25, 2011




If they ever get to Avatar 5 I will actually go to the Pandora theme park. I do not like theme parks and I do not expect them to ever get to that many sequels, but if James Cameron can actually pull it off I will go.

All the sequels have to be Cameron directed though. If he's handing this off to other ppl I will not follow up.

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Impossibly Perfect Sphere
Nov 6, 2002


Has a movie with such a huge box office ever been as unrewatchable as Avatar?

Amorphous Abode
Apr 2, 2010


We may have finally found unobtainium but I will never find eywa.



I recall the scene with the floating forest polyps being really pretty but then also I thought the weird neural fiber mindmeld with the horsebirds being kind of gross and that's really most of what I remember about the movie. I think it was about a lonely guy who wanted to be a sexy alien and got his wish? That's basically it right?

Friends Are Evil
Oct 25, 2010

cats cats cats






Getting couples to kiss under the black velvet painting of naked Na'vi like



oh god please don't nuke my beautiful avastar

Royal Updog
Sep 26, 2019

Do you ever wonder if there are other planets out there
(source)

i swear to god the cg in abe's oddessy was better than this garish poo poo

Peachfart
Jan 21, 2017



Avatar status: still sucks, bad, garbage

Peachfart
Jan 21, 2017



And yes I signed my post
garbage

golden bells
Oct 17, 2013






Na'vi aren't even in the top ten blue aliens to gently caress imo

SpiritOfLenin
Apr 29, 2013




I am learning all sorts of new things today, such as the fact that the movie apparantely had some sort of game judging by my new avatar.

wait no, I've vaguely heard about it now that I think about it. I might have even seen a screenshot once. it had a blue cat person on top of some sort of flying monster. I presume it was from the game, but considering how cgi heavy the movie is, it also could have been from the movie.

Mierenneuker
Apr 28, 2010


We're all going to experience changes in our life but only the best of us will qualify for front row seats.



golden bells posted:

Na'vi aren't even in the top ten blue aliens to gently caress imo

In alphabetic order:
- Andorians (Star Trek)
- Asari (Mass Effect)
- Bolians (Star Trek)
- the aliens from “Blue” by Eiffel 65
- Frost Giants (Marvel Universe version)
- Grays who have consumed too much colloidal silver
- Nakai (Stargate Universe)
- Neosapiens (Exo-Squad, technically homegrown but I’ll allow it)
- the singer from The Fifth Element
- Smurfs (fanfiction dot net version)

Checks out!

Mierenneuker fucked around with this message at 15:49 on Aug 5, 2020

CelticPredator
Oct 11, 2013



You forgot

fauna
Dec 6, 2018


Caught between two worlds...

and andalites

golden bells
Oct 17, 2013






Mierenneuker posted:

In alphabetic order:
- Andorians (Star Trek)
- Asari (Mass Effect)
- Bolians (Star Trek)
- the aliens from “Blue” by Eiffel 65
- Frost Giants (Marvel Universe version)
- Grays who have consumed too much colloidal silver
- Nakai (Stargate Universe)
- Neosapiens (Exo-Squad, technically homebrew but I’ll allow it)
- the singer from The Fifth Element
- Smurfs (fanfiction dot net version)

Checks out!

Good call with the andorians. No one comes close to heartthrob Shran

Archer666
Dec 27, 2008



Can't wait to watch the Avatar sequels and see their use of under water motion capture which is one of the main things that kept the series getting pushed back cause "The tech just wasnt there".

Also did anyone play the Avatar video game?

FunkyAl
Mar 28, 2010

Your vitals soar.


Archer666 posted:

Can't wait to watch the Avatar sequels and see their use of under water motion capture which is one of the main things that kept the series getting pushed back cause "The tech just wasnt there".

Also did anyone play the Avatar video game?



No, but according to the nintendo power I read ten years ago the wii version is supposed to be the best one with a special story created especially by the movie's creators.

golden bells
Oct 17, 2013






Awwwwww yeeeeeeeeaaaaahhhh I got blue'd

Royal Updog
Sep 26, 2019

Do you ever wonder if there are other planets out there
(source)

golden bells posted:

Awwwwww yeeeeeeeeaaaaahhhh I got blue'd



also my av text is now entirely nonsensical but i thank once again the very talented artist who made oh but seriously avatar negative one

FunkyAl
Mar 28, 2010

Your vitals soar.


What's the best way to watch Avatar?

on a blu-ray disc!

Impossibly Perfect Sphere
Nov 6, 2002


I blue myself!

Friends Are Evil
Oct 25, 2010

cats cats cats





I'm not even mad, my av text still kind of matches

Invalid Validation
Jan 13, 2008

DON'T DOUBLE DOWN ON YOUR STUPID SHIT JUST CAUSE YOU THINK IT'S FUNNY. YOU MAKE STUPID FUCKING DECISIONS ALL THE TIME THEN DOUBLE DOWN LIKE A PETULANT CHILD. GOD I FUCKING HATE YOU SO MUCH SOMETIMES.

Did you remember there’s mechs in the movie? No you didn’t you fuckin liar!

Archer666
Dec 27, 2008



Invalid Validation posted:

Did you remember there’s mechs in the movie? No you didn’t you fuckin liar!

No but I do remember a big tree???

golden bells
Oct 17, 2013






10 years ago I was smug for not having seen this movie






And I still am






(Jenny Nicholson's explantation and review of the Pandora park is funny as hell though)

fauna
Dec 6, 2018


Caught between two worlds...

Archer666
Dec 27, 2008



How does the Blue Man Group fit into the canon of James Cameron's Avatar?

Moon Atari
Dec 26, 2010



My theory about Avatar's initial success is that movies that become surprise box office and pop culture phenomenons generally contain a modern twist on some element of spirituality or philosophy that is lacking in western popular consciousness. This spiritual/philosophical element isn't the sole reason for the movies success, but appeal to some neglected spiritual or intellectual impulse in the audience is the secret ingredient that will elevate a simple crowd-pleasing heroic adventure story into a mega-hit.

The most obvious example is with 'The Force' in Star Wars. Offering religion and mysticism stripped of all realworld baggage and specificity, it allows Star Wars to feature something modern stories almost never do: heroes overcoming a challenge through their faith in a higher power, even by direct prayer-like appeal to it in the moment of need. On top of that it is vaguely pantheistic, and has elements of eastern and new age concepts of qi or life force, so offered western audiences access to a form of spirituality not present in their religious tradition and stories inspired by it.

The Matrix is another good example. Firstly, in that it provides audience's a modern and engaging parallel to concepts like Descarte's deceiver of supreme power or Plato's cave, so serves as an entry point to philosophical questioning of reality and perception that is generally neglected in day to day life and mass culture. Then it goes a step further, providing incentive for the epistemological inquiry by suggesting that gaining insight into the true nature of reality produces a meaningful change, granting special powers and abilities. As with the similarity between The Force and qi, this idea has some resemblance to eastern religion, particularly the idea of enlightenment and stories of magical Buddhist or Hindu masters, gurus and mahasiddhas.

Now with Avatar there is obviously significant inspiration from Hindu mythology (beyond just the word 'avatar'), but the neglected element of spirituality it really appeals to is in its new agey, vaguely indigenous people's inspired idea of an environmentally focused pantheistic animism. Sure, this idea is hardly new, and as with the rest of Avatar could easily be criticised as hackneyed tribal native stereotype. But what Avatar succeeded in doing was to present this environmental spirituality in a way that modern audiences could, at least briefly, connect to. For one, its modernisation of the idea with a 'scientific' explanation that the entire ecosystem is a biological neural network helps to convert a spiritual idea into something acceptable in a highly materialist culture.

More importantly though, by pairing the spectacle appeal of its special effects and 3D innovations with a depiction of "nature" it managed to simulate something close to the feeling of awe and wonder in the natural world. The experience of this emotion is essential to believing in environmental spiritualism and (sadly) is almost completely absent from contemporary popular consciousness, perhaps experienced by individuals in brief moments when making a special effort to seek out the natural world but not culturally or politically significant. The emotional experience of awe and wonder in nature might in itself be considered something approaching spiritual, alone and without attaching any more defined mystical or religious worldview to it. In fact, appeal to such an emotional experience acts as the secret ingredient in another notable blockbuster phenomenon Jurassic Park.

But Avatar achieved this sense of awe and wonder with a deeply ironic trick, one that meant its 'appeal to neglected spiritual impulse' factor was time limited. Avatar simulated the awe of nature in a public disinclined towards it through appeal to something they are much more inclined towards: excitement and preoccupation with the new and novel experiences offered by technological advancements. The problem is that the public's preoccupation with technological spectacle is antithetical to a genuine experience of awe in nature. The wonder felt from experiencing a new technological feat like Avatar's visuals at the time of release is entirely dependent on the new advancement and novelty, whereas with nature it is the opposite. So once the newness of Avatar's visuals wore off so did their ability to inspire the sense of awe and wonder, without which it is unable to convincingly sell the environmental spiritualism.

So now stripped of its mega-hit making 'appeal to neglected spiritual impulse' X-factor what is left is a standard action adventure that follows an easily identifiable "native romance" archetype, and the come down from the initial massive popularity provokes a greater criticism than it would otherwise merit.

Impossibly Perfect Sphere
Nov 6, 2002


No.

David D. Davidson
Nov 17, 2012

Orca lady?

I think it's more the impressive for it's time visual effects and the fact that theaters had to buy expensive new equipment to show the movies so they just let it run forever tl recoup the cost, because even at the time of it's release people were complaining that the plot was predictable and generic.

Impossibly Perfect Sphere
Nov 6, 2002


This loving movie was 2 hours and 42 minutes.

Rags to Liches
Mar 11, 2008

future skeleton soldier




I liked the visuals but the rest of it was pretty forgettable

S.D.
Apr 28, 2008


I remember watching this in Asia in the theater - english audio with Chinese subtitles, which meant the parts where the blue cat aliens speak their own language were completely incomprehensible to me. I also remember my sister being neutral about it, her boyfriend (now husband) being enthralled by it, and me just shrugging and cribbing a line from an old Patton Oswalt set about it ("It's tree hugging hippies vs. the military industrial complex, and hippies win. That's not how it was with my action figures when I was ten years old.").

David D. Davidson
Nov 17, 2012

Orca lady?

The plot was so predictable that even at the time of release that people were complaining that the plot was a white savior narrative. And this to remind people was in 2009, people we're still praising Joss Wheedon as a feminist creator for Buffy.

Fleta Mcgurn
Oct 5, 2003

Porpoise noise continues.


I open my eyes and greet my new catgirl blueness with alacrity. I must run into the jungle and find a patch of sand, quickly!

Please remember that Sigourney Weaver was the best part.

Fleta Mcgurn
Oct 5, 2003

Porpoise noise continues.


Tbh I thought Avatar was really good the first time I saw it, so I watched it again. I realized that it was only as good as it was the first time because I saw it in Tokyo and the Na'vi were only subtitles in Japanese, so the incredibly trite dialogue wasn't as grating.

Impossibly Perfect Sphere
Nov 6, 2002


Sigourney Weaver was in this??? I don't even remember her.

Peachfart
Jan 21, 2017



Nobody remembers avatar because it is possibly the most forgettable ultra popular movie ever made.

golden bells
Oct 17, 2013






For every Avatar movie we get one (1) Battle Angel Alita movie

Edgar Allen Ho
Apr 3, 2017


Quoth James Cameron,

"Nevermore"



I unironically want to visit Avatar world in Disney World.

Impossibly Perfect Sphere
Nov 6, 2002


golden bells posted:

For every Avatar movie we get one (1) Battle Angel Alita movie

was that any good?

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FunkyAl
Mar 28, 2010

Your vitals soar.


Moon Atari posted:

My theory about Avatar's initial success is that movies that become surprise box office and pop culture phenomenons generally contain a modern twist on some element of spirituality or philosophy that is lacking in western popular consciousness. This spiritual/philosophical element isn't the sole reason for the movies success, but appeal to some neglected spiritual or intellectual impulse in the audience is the secret ingredient that will elevate a simple crowd-pleasing heroic adventure story into a mega-hit.

The most obvious example is with 'The Force' in Star Wars. Offering religion and mysticism stripped of all realworld baggage and specificity, it allows Star Wars to feature something modern stories almost never do: heroes overcoming a challenge through their faith in a higher power, even by direct prayer-like appeal to it in the moment of need. On top of that it is vaguely pantheistic, and has elements of eastern and new age concepts of qi or life force, so offered western audiences access to a form of spirituality not present in their religious tradition and stories inspired by it.

The Matrix is another good example. Firstly, in that it provides audience's a modern and engaging parallel to concepts like Descarte's deceiver of supreme power or Plato's cave, so serves as an entry point to philosophical questioning of reality and perception that is generally neglected in day to day life and mass culture. Then it goes a step further, providing incentive for the epistemological inquiry by suggesting that gaining insight into the true nature of reality produces a meaningful change, granting special powers and abilities. As with the similarity between The Force and qi, this idea has some resemblance to eastern religion, particularly the idea of enlightenment and stories of magical Buddhist or Hindu masters, gurus and mahasiddhas.

Now with Avatar there is obviously significant inspiration from Hindu mythology (beyond just the word 'avatar'), but the neglected element of spirituality it really appeals to is in its new agey, vaguely indigenous people's inspired idea of an environmentally focused pantheistic animism. Sure, this idea is hardly new, and as with the rest of Avatar could easily be criticised as hackneyed tribal native stereotype. But what Avatar succeeded in doing was to present this environmental spirituality in a way that modern audiences could, at least briefly, connect to. For one, its modernisation of the idea with a 'scientific' explanation that the entire ecosystem is a biological neural network helps to convert a spiritual idea into something acceptable in a highly materialist culture.

More importantly though, by pairing the spectacle appeal of its special effects and 3D innovations with a depiction of "nature" it managed to simulate something close to the feeling of awe and wonder in the natural world. The experience of this emotion is essential to believing in environmental spiritualism and (sadly) is almost completely absent from contemporary popular consciousness, perhaps experienced by individuals in brief moments when making a special effort to seek out the natural world but not culturally or politically significant. The emotional experience of awe and wonder in nature might in itself be considered something approaching spiritual, alone and without attaching any more defined mystical or religious worldview to it. In fact, appeal to such an emotional experience acts as the secret ingredient in another notable blockbuster phenomenon Jurassic Park.

But Avatar achieved this sense of awe and wonder with a deeply ironic trick, one that meant its 'appeal to neglected spiritual impulse' factor was time limited. Avatar simulated the awe of nature in a public disinclined towards it through appeal to something they are much more inclined towards: excitement and preoccupation with the new and novel experiences offered by technological advancements. The problem is that the public's preoccupation with technological spectacle is antithetical to a genuine experience of awe in nature. The wonder felt from experiencing a new technological feat like Avatar's visuals at the time of release is entirely dependent on the new advancement and novelty, whereas with nature it is the opposite. So once the newness of Avatar's visuals wore off so did their ability to inspire the sense of awe and wonder, without which it is unable to convincingly sell the environmental spiritualism.

So now stripped of its mega-hit making 'appeal to neglected spiritual impulse' X-factor what is left is a standard action adventure that follows an easily identifiable "native romance" archetype, and the come down from the initial massive popularity provokes a greater criticism than it would otherwise merit.

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