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PurpleXVI
Oct 30, 2011

Spewing insults, pissing off all your neighbors, betraying your allies, backing out of treaties and accords, and generally screwing over the global environment?
ALL PART OF MY BRILLIANT STRATEGY!


Man, the property looks gorgeous, but I have to ask...

When it comes to not just knocking the place down and starting over from a muddy plot, because it sounds like you'd have had less work approaching it from that direction, is it because there was something genuinely worth keeping about the interior/exterior or just because it took a while to realize how hosed the place was?

Because the impression here is that you're left with not an awful lot from the original structure by the time you're done with this.

Also at finding asbestos in there, that's always been one of my nightmare scenarios when I've been out doing plumbing work. Mesothelioma scares the poo poo out of me.

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PurpleXVI
Oct 30, 2011

Spewing insults, pissing off all your neighbors, betraying your allies, backing out of treaties and accords, and generally screwing over the global environment?
ALL PART OF MY BRILLIANT STRATEGY!


Are those still the original wooden floors inside? Anything salvageable in them? Because it has a very satisfying rich colour.

PurpleXVI
Oct 30, 2011

Spewing insults, pissing off all your neighbors, betraying your allies, backing out of treaties and accords, and generally screwing over the global environment?
ALL PART OF MY BRILLIANT STRATEGY!


Huh, I hadn't spotted that big ol' chimney before. Does the place have a wood-fired furnace or something similar?

PurpleXVI
Oct 30, 2011

Spewing insults, pissing off all your neighbors, betraying your allies, backing out of treaties and accords, and generally screwing over the global environment?
ALL PART OF MY BRILLIANT STRATEGY!



Awww, you're good to the little guy.

PurpleXVI
Oct 30, 2011

Spewing insults, pissing off all your neighbors, betraying your allies, backing out of treaties and accords, and generally screwing over the global environment?
ALL PART OF MY BRILLIANT STRATEGY!


So uh, who's saddled with the responsibility for that trash shack?

PurpleXVI
Oct 30, 2011

Spewing insults, pissing off all your neighbors, betraying your allies, backing out of treaties and accords, and generally screwing over the global environment?
ALL PART OF MY BRILLIANT STRATEGY!


Elviscat posted:

I've sweated some medium size projects together in the past, but now I think PEX is honestly just as good, way cheaper, and way easier.

There's never any reason not to use PEX, in my experience, except if it's something visible, like in a basement along the walls/ceiling or along a bathroom wall if you don't have space to sink it into the walls. It lasts better than anything metal, you can bend it around corners, you can shorten it without needing to gently caress around cutting new threading, you can run like fifty meters of it with no loving around fitting together shorter parts. Wonderful.

Once it's visible, Alu-PEX is definitely my favourite material, but copper or steel piping with cinched fittings is also acceptable. Sadly cinch-fitting alu-pex, steel and copper requires special tools that you might not be able to easily rent and which would be a big expenditure for just doing DIY stuff.

In that case I guess there's always copper solder fittings instead, but I always have trouble trusting those entirely and in some cases you might not have the space to safely gently caress around with an open flame.

Working with galvanized or black steel pipes is the sort of thing I'd only ever do if it was what was already there, though, for the sake of continuing a look or being sure I didn't cause any galvanic corrosion by mixing materials.

PurpleXVI
Oct 30, 2011

Spewing insults, pissing off all your neighbors, betraying your allies, backing out of treaties and accords, and generally screwing over the global environment?
ALL PART OF MY BRILLIANT STRATEGY!


I gotta say, I'm really impressed with the difference you're making! I hope you're snapping some semi-similar angles from your first pics sometimes, just to set up some good before/after shots.

PurpleXVI
Oct 30, 2011

Spewing insults, pissing off all your neighbors, betraying your allies, backing out of treaties and accords, and generally screwing over the global environment?
ALL PART OF MY BRILLIANT STRATEGY!


What the gently caress did they do to that poor bolt.

PurpleXVI
Oct 30, 2011

Spewing insults, pissing off all your neighbors, betraying your allies, backing out of treaties and accords, and generally screwing over the global environment?
ALL PART OF MY BRILLIANT STRATEGY!



Are you doing this work in sandals rather than steel-toed footwear? Or is that post-work wear?

Proper safety gear is important.

PurpleXVI
Oct 30, 2011

Spewing insults, pissing off all your neighbors, betraying your allies, backing out of treaties and accords, and generally screwing over the global environment?
ALL PART OF MY BRILLIANT STRATEGY!


I have to admit I'm curious about the venting, any particular reason you're custom-making rectangular vent pieces rather than just working with pre-made round vent piping?

PurpleXVI
Oct 30, 2011

Spewing insults, pissing off all your neighbors, betraying your allies, backing out of treaties and accords, and generally screwing over the global environment?
ALL PART OF MY BRILLIANT STRATEGY!


Elviscat posted:

The main trunk has to be rectangular to fit up to the air handler, and round duct and round adapters/reducers that could handle the required airflow aren't readily available, but bare sheetmetal is, plus for the downstairs I couldn't really fit the required diameter of round pipe to get the CFM I need. As is I had to order parts of the internet to use the two 12" flexible ducts for the cold air return that are pictured somewhere upthread before the floor went in.

I did lay the system out to use prefab/flexible round duct wherever possible, there'll be 2 8" round flex ducts in the attic, and 2 6" for the bathrooms when I'm done fitting everything up .

That's one hell of a hefty ventilation system. Around here, 100mm(about 4") would be the norm for a single room, like a bathroom, while the fan above a stove would be about 6". Pretty much nothing in home ventilation goes above the 6" size, anything bigger is more or less purely for industry.

Also consider using firm pipe rather than flex ducts if you can, they'll be a lot less noisy.

PurpleXVI
Oct 30, 2011

Spewing insults, pissing off all your neighbors, betraying your allies, backing out of treaties and accords, and generally screwing over the global environment?
ALL PART OF MY BRILLIANT STRATEGY!


Elviscat posted:

Do you not have a lot of central forced air heating then?

Pretty much any central heating in Denmark is water-based, so radiators and floor pipes rather than fuckoff-huge ventilation shafts. Anything air-based tends to be an air/air heat pump with just one or two internal locations it pumps out the heat.

PurpleXVI
Oct 30, 2011

Spewing insults, pissing off all your neighbors, betraying your allies, backing out of treaties and accords, and generally screwing over the global environment?
ALL PART OF MY BRILLIANT STRATEGY!


Elviscat posted:

That's how the older bit of the US is, since the 70's or so new builds seem to all have gone to forced air systems, or pure resistive electric, that's what this house had, and heating bills were like $400 a month in winter, I didn't really think of going to a heat pump until I read Kastein's thread, I'd never heard of anyone installing their own central air before he did, he's also helped me out with it outside this thread.

We don't see temperatures much below 0C here during the winter, so a heat pump was a really attractive option for efficiency, and affordable since I can DIY it, having central air installed by a pro would've been more than I could afford, I also didn't really like the idea of mini-splits everywhere, just because they're ugly, mostly. The kitchen will probably get one eventually though.

Generally unless you have a very large home or one that's split up into a lot of small rooms, a heat pump doesn't really need to be a split version as long as the internal part can be located somewhere relatively centrally. Especially not if you have some internal ventilation for heat distribution(we've got that here, it doesn't provide heat, it just makes sure the house is equally heated and also makes sure we're not huffing the same dust for weeks). Heat pumps can also usually tolerate down to -15C, though of course their efficiency is worse the lower the outside temps are. The alternative is a ground-to-air/water pump, since the temps in the ground tend to be a lot more consistent if you dig down deep enough.

Electric heating is more or less consistently the worst option you can pick in terms of efficiency, though it's got the advantage of being relatively simple and being something you can easily shove into an existing build without having to tear up too much.

Central air is generally so unheard-of here that I wouldn't even know enough to compare it to central water heating. My gut feeling is that it would, once again, depend on how your home is built. If it's got multiple levels, then it'd probably be easier to find space for water pipes than air ducts, and it'd probably also be easier to insulate water pipes to avoid losing heat if you're moving the heat a long distance from the central furnace. Water also has the advantage that it could be used for heated floors, which are muy bueno. I guess the main advantage of central air would be that I could see it requiring less maintenance than central water, no chance of pipe corrosion(hopefully, unless something goes very wrong), a damaged pipe wouldn't lead to water damage, etc. and you wouldn't need to give up any wall space for radiators.

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PurpleXVI
Oct 30, 2011

Spewing insults, pissing off all your neighbors, betraying your allies, backing out of treaties and accords, and generally screwing over the global environment?
ALL PART OF MY BRILLIANT STRATEGY!


gwrtheyrn posted:

Blackberry thickets and fun are not usually words that I associate with each other.

...am I the only person in the world who loves blackberry thickets? They're free berries.

Plus if you have a blackberry thicket instead of a lawn you don't have to mow it, just lop off a few creepers when it tries to escape whatever containment zone you have for it.

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