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Syrian Lannister
Aug 25, 2007

Oh, did I kill him too?
I've been a very busy little man.




Sugartime Jones

Did they stop issuing the aqua pure tablets with the 1 and 2 qt canteens?

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pantslesswithwolves
Oct 27, 2008

Ba-dam ba-DUMMMMMM


I have a ton of iodine tablets that Iíve never used from all my trips to Africa. Iíd get issued them by my agencyís health division, get to my mission site, and find bottled water was plentiful and cheap. So now I have iodine tablets in my home, in my go-bag and in my car bag, and Iím still finding bottles of them randomly.

I prefer using my Sawyer Squeeze as my primary purification method. Compact and reliable, plus you can keep untreated water in the bag in reserve after youíve topped off your bottles. I have two of the Minis, oneís in my car kit and the other is in reserve for hiking/backpacking/bikepacking. It was great when my wife and I went hiking in George Washington National Forest and could just top off our water every time we passed a creek.

Question: how concerned should I be about trying to filter water that would have agricultural runoff in it? In my area, the areas where Iíd want to evacuate to are in proximity to exurban farms. I know my filters and alternate methods can handle bacteria just fine, but what about pesticides and fertilizers? Iíve read that the Sawyer S3 can filter those and viruses out, but Iím not sure if Iíd need something like that.

CopperHound
Feb 14, 2012



BigDave posted:

I've had to drink bleach water before, kool aid or gatorade powder is a godsend
Also worth noting that hi-c or vitamin c in general will neutralize iodine flavor. Just make sure you gave it time to work before you neutralize it.

IDK if it helps on the toxic effects of excessive iodine.

SMEGMA_MAIL
May 4, 2018


THUNDERDOME LOSER 2021





Godholio posted:

Pretty sure we used iodine in SERE.

Great.

It's fine, I'm pretty sure it's just that it becomes toxic if you're pounding iodine water for months, since what I heard is that it builds up in your thyroid or something.

Grip it and rip it
Apr 28, 2020

Be the change you want see in the world


I just drink ocean water*

CommieGIR
Aug 22, 2006

If Godzilla can do it, you know I can deliver!


Pillbug

SpaceSDoorGunner posted:

It's fine, I'm pretty sure it's just that it becomes toxic if you're pounding iodine water for months, since what I heard is that it builds up in your thyroid or something.

Yeah, it builds up, its part of why you issue iodine for nuclear accidents: to force the thyroid to absorb normal iodine faster than radioactive iodine.

ganglysumbia
Jan 29, 2005


A few doses of iodine in a survival situation or part of training wonít cause any long term harm, just donít make it part of your multiday vitamin.

Also, if youíre using a rain barrel or something of the sort as an emergency water source it would be a good idea to make sure it is cleaned / sterilized a few times a year. In regards to that I see a lot of new houses around me being built with underground rain harvesting barrels (3000 liters +) and I have no idea how they intend on cleaning them other than having to always add chlorine which would probably not be great for their gardens. Though they probably also donít intend on having to drink from it.

Yossarian-22
Oct 26, 2014



Any good resources specifically for earthquake prep? I live in the Bay Area and it's easily my #1 concern. I am also full of anxiety and get overwhelmed when presented with large amounts of info at once (including the original post) so the more simplified the better

ASAPI
Apr 20, 2007
I invented the line.



Yossarian-22 posted:

Any good resources specifically for earthquake prep? I live in the Bay Area and it's easily my #1 concern. I am also full of anxiety and get overwhelmed when presented with large amounts of info at once (including the original post) so the more simplified the better

Most "prepping" is all the same, water, food, shelter/transportation.

Really what you need to look out for is how long without [insert thing] and where you are when that happens. My wife's "earthquake kit" that she kept in her truck was a blanket, real shoes, water, food. I later convinced her a can opener needed to be added. At home basically the same thing, but larger quantities. When she was in CA I think she had a week of everything stocked up.

In your case, you are really balancing storage space versus if that structure will continue to exist versus when/where help will arrive. Someone can correct me, but the guidance is 1 gallon of water per person, per day. Once you hit that level, everything else is pretty common sense.

Android Apocalypse
Apr 28, 2009

The future is
AUTOMATED
and you are
OBSOLETE






Illegal Hen

I took an emergency preparedness class and the biggest anecdote I learned from a Los Angeles resident was to have hard-soled slippers near your bed. Nothing worse than waking up in the middle of the night and trying to escape a dark, glass & debris-strewn residence in bare feet.

withak
Jan 15, 2003


Fun Shoe

Biggest earthquake-specific requirement might be portability because your house might not be habitable afterwards and your closet/basement crammed full of survival gear may be out of reach without an excavator and bulldozer.

Nitrousoxide
May 30, 2011

do not buy a oneplus phone





If you do any hiking, keeping your hiking gear stored near your bed can allow it to do double duty of being a portable short term survival gear bag that's more or less ready to go without having to spend any extra money.

ulmont
Sep 15, 2010

IF I EVER MISS VOTING IN AN ELECTION (EVEN AMERICAN IDOL) ,OR HAVE UNPAID PARKING TICKETS, PLEASE TAKE AWAY MY FRANCHISE


Godholio posted:

Pretty sure we used iodine in SERE.

Great.

Yeah, that's pushing up to the line.

CDC posted:

Iodine and iodine-containing tablets (tetraglycine hydroperiodide) or chlorine tablets are not effective against Cryptosporidium. Water that has been disinfected with iodine is NOT recommended for pregnant women, people with thyroid problems, those with known hypersensitivity to iodine, or for continuous use for more than a few weeks at a time.
https://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/emergency/making-water-safe.html

Discussion Quorum
Dec 5, 2002
Armchair Philistine


pantslesswithwolves posted:

Question: how concerned should I be about trying to filter water that would have agricultural runoff in it? In my area, the areas where I’d want to evacuate to are in proximity to exurban farms. I know my filters and alternate methods can handle bacteria just fine, but what about pesticides and fertilizers? I’ve read that the Sawyer S3 can filter those and viruses out, but I’m not sure if I’d need something like that.

I was concerned about this, and heavy metals. Not only because I live in a big city, but even in the "country" every supply of water is likely to have agricultural and industrial runoff in it. No clear running mountain streams within few hundred miles.

I got Survivor filters for our kits. I saw some negative reviews of the S3 and some more positive reviews of these. There don't seem to be many other options.

L0cke17
Nov 29, 2013



Ok, so dumb question time:

Texas totally poo poo the bed last week.

If this happens again and power and gas and water are out what's the best way to keep 1 room indoors warm?

We isolated the master bathroom/bath so we would have a toilet to use without opening up to the cold rest of the house, hung blankets over the window, stayed in it and it was still low 40s in there after 40+ hours of no furnace going.

We burned the candles we had, but that barely seemed to help at all with the heat. (Though maybe it did, the rest of the house was 34ish degrees when power came back).

Is there something I can buy or could have done better?

Flying_Crab
Apr 12, 2002





What about LifeStraws? I bought one super cheap on sale and threw it in my tiny pile of hiking/emergency stuff, figured itís better than nothing for a few dollars.

ASAPI
Apr 20, 2007
I invented the line.



L0cke17 posted:

Ok, so dumb question time:

Texas totally poo poo the bed last week.

If this happens again and power and gas and water are out what's the best way to keep 1 room indoors warm?

We isolated the master bathroom/bath so we would have a toilet to use without opening up to the cold rest of the house, hung blankets over the window, stayed in it and it was still low 40s in there after 40+ hours of no furnace going.

We burned the candles we had, but that barely seemed to help at all with the heat. (Though maybe it did, the rest of the house was 34ish degrees when power came back).

Is there something I can buy or could have done better?

Generators for space heaters if your situation allows. A tent can actually help, even indoors. Pile blankets over it to create a sort of ďyurtĒ. The additional layers will help insulate.

I would focus on the generator/inverter route though. A space heater will make a world of difference.

L0cke17
Nov 29, 2013



ASAPI posted:

Generators for space heaters if your situation allows. A tent can actually help, even indoors. Pile blankets over it to create a sort of ďyurtĒ. The additional layers will help insulate.

I would focus on the generator/inverter route though. A space heater will make a world of difference.

Cool, we were already planning on generator. Because there's also hurricanes here we were thinking of getting one that ties into our natural gas line and has a backup of propane. Is there anything specific I need to know about storing/stockpiling propane in case the gas goes out?

ganglysumbia
Jan 29, 2005


L0cke17 posted:

Cool, we were already planning on generator. Because there's also hurricanes here we were thinking of getting one that ties into our natural gas line and has a backup of propane. Is there anything specific I need to know about storing/stockpiling propane in case the gas goes out?


Propane doesnít degrade like other fuels, so if your storage container doesnít leak you should have no problems using it during emergencies. Though Iím not sure how easy / practical it would be to tie into your gas line. Might be simpler to have the generator and gas as a separate system.

ASAPI
Apr 20, 2007
I invented the line.



L0cke17 posted:

Cool, we were already planning on generator. Because there's also hurricanes here we were thinking of getting one that ties into our natural gas line and has a backup of propane. Is there anything specific I need to know about storing/stockpiling propane in case the gas goes out?

Just be prepared for regular maintenance and testing on the generator.

Depending on how paranoid you are, an additional smaller gas powered generator might be handy to have. The only issue with a regular generator like that is rotating fuel reserves to ensure you have plenty of "good" gas.

From what I have seen in my area, lots of people were having success with solar panel and battery combos. The only issue with those are that they are super expensive. The wife and I have changed priorities and are now saving for a healthy solar system.

Nitrousoxide
May 30, 2011

do not buy a oneplus phone





A wood pellet stove may be another option for emergency heating for your house. They only require direct venting to outside so a small hole right next to them instead of requiring a chimney. They do require a small amount of power to run a fan and a small hopper, usually about 100 Watts or something but you would require quite a bit of energy to heat a significant portion of your house with a generator through an electric resistance heater.

If you get one properly sized for your house then it will allow you to protect all of your pipes from bursting in a freeze which would save you a lot of money in repairs.

Wood pellets also don't go bad unlike gasoline for a gas generator. So you can combine that with a propane-powered generator and you have your heat and electricity fuel sources that won't need to be constantly cycled out.

pantslesswithwolves
Oct 27, 2008

Ba-dam ba-DUMMMMMM


Discussion Quorum posted:

I was concerned about this, and heavy metals. Not only because I live in a big city, but even in the "country" every supply of water is likely to have agricultural and industrial runoff in it. No clear running mountain streams within few hundred miles.

I got Survivor filters for our kits. I saw some negative reviews of the S3 and some more positive reviews of these. There don't seem to be many other options.

Thanks, Iíll have to check that out. Iíll do some research on this myself and come back to the thread if I find some other options as well.

ASAPI posted:

From what I have seen in my area, lots of people were having success with solar panel and battery combos. The only issue with those are that they are super expensive. The wife and I have changed priorities and are now saving for a healthy solar system.

For a cheaper, interim option, manufacturers like Goal Zero sell solar powered battery banks and generators like this one that can be used to power at least a few devices, although Iíd think powering a space heater would drain it super fast. My agency bought a few of these and sent them to some overseas locations where reliable power is an issue, solely for the purpose of allowing critical staff to always keep laptops, sat phones and radios powered.

ASAPI
Apr 20, 2007
I invented the line.



pantslesswithwolves posted:



For a cheaper, interim option, manufacturers like Goal Zero sell solar powered battery banks and generators like this one that can be used to power at least a few devices, although Iíd think powering a space heater would drain it super fast. My agency bought a few of these and sent them to some overseas locations where reliable power is an issue, solely for the purpose of allowing critical staff to always keep laptops, sat phones and radios powered.

I looked into some things like that actually. They didn't seem to quite solve anything for me though. Between vehicles and battery banks we were able to charge devices without an issue.

I'm still getting details on how, but a few people were able to wire in their heater fan (natural gas for heat) to their generators/small panel setups which they claim helped. Once I get numbers worked out I can see if something like Goal Zero would help. I would really prefer to use a solar solution over any form of fuel generators for its ease of use and the fact if the sun is gone we have larger issues... Hopefully the price comes down some and the tech gets better sooner than later.

Nitrousoxide
May 30, 2011

do not buy a oneplus phone





I mean, keep in mind that solar is not an ideal power source for the thing you're trying to solve. You're trying to power a heater in the middle of a snowstorm, the time you're likely to get the least amount of sun and when your panels will keep getting covered with snow.

ASAPI
Apr 20, 2007
I invented the line.



Nitrousoxide posted:

I mean, keep in mind that solar is not an ideal power source for the thing you're trying to solve. You're trying to power a heater in the middle of a snowstorm, the time you're likely to get the least amount of sun and when your panels will keep getting covered with snow.

It actually depends on the type of heater he has. In my case, I have gas heat, I only need the small amount of power to spin the fan and run the controls. So small solar/battery can work for heat, but screws me for AC in the summer.

That is the reason I am hesitant to spring for a partial solar solution. In my mind, that route carries the same risk/reward as a fuel generator.

Ideally, I would be on a system to generates enough solar during the day to fill a battery bank that could last me a couple of days if I conserve. I totally do NOT have the cash for that though...

Guest2553
Aug 3, 2012


Flying_Crab posted:

What about LifeStraws? I bought one super cheap on sale and threw it in my tiny pile of hiking/emergency stuff, figured itís better than nothing for a few dollars.

Depends which one you have. The newer ones have carbon filters to clear out contaminants like organic compounds and heavy metals, but they need to be replaced every 100L. The older ones don't and are (imo) inferior to other less fragile and more compact hollow membrane filter devices like the sawyer mini or squeeze.

The gold plated solution is something like the LifeSaver jerry can which is good for 10 or 20k liters and removed microbiological contamination but costs a few hundred. It won't get the salt out of seawater but it can treat piss.

e. There jerry can has its own issues - the carbon filters make it pretty slow and degrade with time even if not used, and turbid water needs to be strained or treated with a flocculating agent so the filters don't clog - but those are true of filters in general, not just this one. Also worth noting that the activated carbon filters need to be changed out every 500L, and that the filter cartridge can be replaced as well so it's not like you're stuck with a lump of plastic if you managed to burn through all 5200 gallons worth of dirty water in your natural life.

Guest2553 fucked around with this message at 17:27 on Feb 24, 2021

Nitrousoxide
May 30, 2011

do not buy a oneplus phone





Guest2553 posted:

The gold plated solution is something like the LifeSaver jerry can which is good for 10 or 20k liters and removed microbiological contamination but costs a few hundred. It won't get the salt out of seawater but it can treat piss.

At long last I can have the stillsuit I always wanted.

MRC48B
Apr 2, 2012



Nitrousoxide posted:

A wood pellet stove may be another option for emergency heating for your house.

My dream offgrid is solar, wood pellet/biomass heat, plus an air stirling engine to pull electricity from that sweet, sweet delta T when the sun isnt enough.

Guest2553
Aug 3, 2012


Store the wood pellets outside of the home though, I've seen a couple houses burn down because of them. One site smoldered under the wreckage for days and the FD had to take a couple trips back when pockets of it flared up.

MRC48B
Apr 2, 2012



Up north a lot of wood furnaces are installed in an exterior shack separate from the main dwelling, then they use a buried glycol/water piping loop to pump the heat to the house. You lose efficiency that way but as the above poster mentioned its better than a house fire.

shame on an IGA
Apr 8, 2005



I'd as well take my chances with fire over a boiler explosion

Flying_Crab
Apr 12, 2002





Guest2553 posted:

Depends which one you have. The newer ones have carbon filters to clear out contaminants like organic compounds and heavy metals, but they need to be replaced every 100L. The older ones don't and are (imo) inferior to other less fragile and more compact hollow membrane filter devices like the sawyer mini or squeeze.

The gold plated solution is something like the LifeSaver jerry can which is good for 10 or 20k liters and removed microbiological contamination but costs a few hundred. It won't get the salt out of seawater but it can treat piss.

e. There jerry can has its own issues - the carbon filters make it pretty slow and degrade with time even if not used, and turbid water needs to be strained or treated with a flocculating agent so the filters don't clog - but those are true of filters in general, not just this one. Also worth noting that the activated carbon filters need to be changed out every 500L, and that the filter cartridge can be replaced as well so it's not like you're stuck with a lump of plastic if you managed to burn through all 5200 gallons worth of dirty water in your natural life.

Cool. I live on Lake Michigan so access to good quality water isnít really a question beyond basic treatment/filtration, luckily.

Nitrousoxide
May 30, 2011

do not buy a oneplus phone





Not sure how good all these books are, humble bundle is running a "Home and Hobby DIY" book thing, and a lot of these are relevant for emergency preparedness as resources to have on hand in the event of a grid down situation.


https://www.humblebundle.com/books/diy-home-hobby-wiley-books

Discussion Quorum
Dec 5, 2002
Armchair Philistine


There's also a "Survive Everything" bundle going right now as well. The titles appear to range from genuinely useful to SPEC OPS PREPPER SECRETS

https://www.humblebundle.com/books/survive-everything-skyhorse-books

ASAPI
Apr 20, 2007
I invented the line.



I like the idea of the book bundle. I don't like that they are all digital. Looking at the titles, I am thinking I may get a few "real" copies as reference to have around.

AreWeDrunkYet
Jul 8, 2006



ASAPI posted:

I like the idea of the book bundle. I don't like that they are all digital. Looking at the titles, I am thinking I may get a few "real" copies as reference to have around.

That's a good point. Digital books on emergency preparation are good for advance reading, but pretty useless as reference material once the power is out.

There was an amusing Twitter thread during the TX blackouts that got to a similar point - for the love of god make sure you have a non-electric can opener to get into your emergency food.

https://twitter.com/torriangray/status/1361778280521605122

stealie72
Jan 10, 2007

Their eyes locked and suddenly there was the sound of breaking glass.


AreWeDrunkYet posted:

That's a good point. Digital books on emergency preparation are good for advance reading, but pretty useless as reference material once the power is out.

There was an amusing Twitter thread during the TX blackouts that got to a similar point - for the love of god make sure you have a non-electric can opener to get into your emergency food.

https://twitter.com/torriangray/status/1361778280521605122
A visit to the TSA-confiscated knife guy at the flea market/gun show/swap meet will help you with that. I can't stop buying $5 swiss army knives to the point that several rooms in the house and all of the family's vehicles are equipped to open tin cans or wine bottles, as the situation dictates. Also, to poorly sew leather and adjust a very limited range of slotted screws.

Nitrousoxide
May 30, 2011

do not buy a oneplus phone





AreWeDrunkYet posted:

That's a good point. Digital books on emergency preparation are good for advance reading, but pretty useless as reference material once the power is out.

There was an amusing Twitter thread during the TX blackouts that got to a similar point - for the love of god make sure you have a non-electric can opener to get into your emergency food.

https://twitter.com/torriangray/status/1361778280521605122

I'm personally fine with them, just make sure part of your emergency prep includes a power source like solar/battery.

You're going to want one anyway for your phone/radio/lights. Being able to power an iPad or e-reader with all of the reference materials you'd need in a nice compact package is a useful addition.

It also lets you download and navigate using OSM maps off the grid as well.

Godholio
Aug 28, 2002

Does a bear split in the woods near Zheleznogorsk?


It's a lot easier to lug a kindle/tablet, a small solar charger, and a lithium battery pack thing than a stack of books.

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ASAPI
Apr 20, 2007
I invented the line.



For clarification:

I have no intention of lugging these books anywhere, and prefer digital books normally.

I am just thinking that a manual, in hard copy form, can be more useful than a tablet/kindle when I don't have power (or devices are dead for whatever reason) and I need the info NOW.

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