Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us money per month for bills, and since we don't believe in showing ads to our users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
 
  • Post
  • Reply
ANOTHER SCORCHER
Aug 12, 2018
Probation
Can't post for 15 days!


Jerusalem posted:

It's great, because for Duck Don is this major obstacle to overcome, while for Don Duck is largely outside of his thoughts and concerns.

Saving this for later.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

ANOTHER SCORCHER
Aug 12, 2018
Probation
Can't post for 15 days!


Shageletic posted:

Yeah the show does a great job of showing why Don does the thing he does, because of his entirely hosed up childhood and need to lie about himself.

The impression that the show is interested in downplaying Don's faults and more interested in showing him being awesome, is a take you'd get from watching the DON OWNS youtube vids, than the show itself.

e: one interesting thing about those vids, they never talk about what Don does in the last few seasons. It's always cuts off around the 4th season lol. wonder why.

I just finished a rewatch inspired by this thread and Don's entire second marriage is pretty clearly presented as the actions of a pathetic man trying to improve on his last marriage while being fundamentally unable to overcome his personality flaws. For the first time in his life he ends up in the beginning of a somewhat-healthy relationship with a woman (Faye) before throwing it away to marry his secretary because she is: a) nice to his kids and b) happens to be in California when he's vulnerable so he is able to tell her about himself. After an entire season of acting like a baby because she won't be the kind of woman he wants her to be, Season 4 ends by implying that he cheats on her because she expressed some minimal independence. It is clearly not an enviable way to be, despite the glamorousness of Don's life.

ANOTHER SCORCHER
Aug 12, 2018
Probation
Can't post for 15 days!


Gaius Marius posted:

[Is you're username a reference to that loving Kenmore Ad?

It is. I used to have an avatar and text from it too but it got changed to this in the avatar thread of the sci-fi forum.

ANOTHER SCORCHER
Aug 12, 2018
Probation
Can't post for 15 days!


VinylonUnderground posted:

Why should we care about Don's cowardice? As I mentioned in the post that kicked this all off, it's very W's America. Look at Max Cleland and John Kerry then compare them to Saxby Chambliss and W. In that sense, humanizing Don with his self-indulgent "emptiness" is loving evil. We even see Don have the chance to start everything over again where he will succeed again. So what if Don runs away from NYC with a new woman to where ever? He's going to be able to make himself again and again and again. He the ultimate self-made man because he's constantly remaking himself.

If the show is “loving evil” you probably shouldn’t watch it. I don’t club homeless people on the weekend and then post about how naughty I am.

ANOTHER SCORCHER
Aug 12, 2018
Probation
Can't post for 15 days!


Imagine stealing jokes from Zizek in 2021. *sad trombone noise*

ANOTHER SCORCHER
Aug 12, 2018
Probation
Can't post for 15 days!


Re: Pete’s politics

He’s consistently portrayed as the most politically liberal/progressive, within the obviously limited confines of upper-class white New York society.

ANOTHER SCORCHER
Aug 12, 2018
Probation
Can't post for 15 days!


Yoshi Wins posted:

Freddy is right that Don should quit drinking, but Don refuses to even entertain the thought. He's not ready for that. Maybe he'll never be. Freddy got clean while going to AA, but Don really doesn't seem like the AA type, so he'd probably need to figure out some other solution. We never see that happen.

Transcendental Meditation is his solution, presumably.

ANOTHER SCORCHER
Aug 12, 2018
Probation
Can't post for 15 days!


VinylonUnderground posted:

Creating the most famous ad will very much make Don respected. It cements his legacy as one of the, if not the greatest ad men ever. He is free from all his past attachments and can start over again, again. Something Don is extremely good at. To me, it very much reads as a "Don wins" scenario.

I disagree with this reading but I don’t think it’s unfair. All of Don’s rough edges are sanded down by capital until he is the perfect advertising machine - transforming his alienation and misery into a way to sell poison water. That’s a tragedy and it happens every day, to everyone, which is one of the reasons I love Mad Men. If you view the ending as a triumph though then I do think it could ring a bit hollow.

VinylonUnderground posted:

As for "inexplicable" Bush references, I don't get what is so "inexplicable" about mentioning what was happening in the real world when Mad Men was airing and being created. In the early aughts there was a huge change in how masculinity was perceived and Don Draper is absolutely a part of that. There is a reason that one of the more prominent "new" forms of masculinity that arose during the aughts, pick up artistry, was nominally apolitical at the time but now is intrinsically tied to the Trump-wing of the Republican party. W was part of that transition as well, his evangelical sect was based on the idea of "real men love Jesus". So as a society we were transitioning away from a "strong silent John Wayne" type to a softer more sensitive man that also created its own reaction. The toxic men of Draper, White and Soprano all feed into this discussion. Thinking that Don having the material means to be sad doesn't negate his place in that discussion.

Sure, and while they show certainly revels in the absurdity of the patriarchal norms of the time the entire series is about showing these men - Don, Pete, Roger - as pathetic and empty. All of them only become happy once they’ve discarded the the toxic masculinity of the 1950s. Pete reconciles with his wife and stops pursuing some rich playboy lifestyle, Roger marries a woman his own age who challenges him, and Don of course loses everything and ends up at the retreat. Peggy, and the social changes of lean-in neoliberal capitalism she represents, is the real victor of the series as a whole. Don isn’t Trump, he is Bush transforming into Obama. Whether that is good or bad will depend on your politics of course.

ANOTHER SCORCHER
Aug 12, 2018
Probation
Can't post for 15 days!


I like that Gene is both objectively a miserable rear end in a top hat and also 100% clocks Don Draper from moment one.

ANOTHER SCORCHER
Aug 12, 2018
Probation
Can't post for 15 days!


In my experience with conservative Catholic ethnic whites, especially of that generation, that behavior seemed extremely believable. The rapid switch from doting and loving to cruel and judgmental was commonplace. That isn’t to say it’s not pathological.

ANOTHER SCORCHER
Aug 12, 2018
Probation
Can't post for 15 days!


JethroMcB posted:

If that were the case (and I very much doubt that it is,) there would have to be failures at multiple levels in the production. There's really no other way to read what happens in that room between those two, even if we don't see it happen in explicit detail.

This does not change what happened on screen, but supposedly the scene as written had the au pair be more clearly affirmative in responding to Pete's advances. It should not really matter since he is blackmailing her into sex anyway, but Pete's actor, Vincent Kartheiser (who probably has a lot of sympathy for the character he plays), said this in 2010:

2010 Wall Street Journal article posted:

In an outburst that started at his table, then turned loud enough to engage the other diners, he insisted that Pete never forced himself onto his neighbor's au pair in season three's "Souvenir" episode.

"It says in the scene, 'she kisses him back,' " he said. "After she kisses me back, then we're supposed to copulate. I don't know why but she wouldn't kiss me back!"

He added: "That actress just didn't want to smooch me. She changed the whole course of Pete Campbell. And Matthew [Weiner] was all, 'You didn't rape her! I don't know why people are saying you raped her! That wasn't supposed to be rape!'"

I find it tempting to believe the scene was written that way, largely because it is hard to enjoy any of Pete's later character development given how unforgivable rape is. But as presented on screen it is pretty clearly rape by coercion. At least Greg is never presented as anything but pathetic, and eventually gets confronted about what he did to Joan.

ANOTHER SCORCHER fucked around with this message at 19:21 on Apr 2, 2021

ANOTHER SCORCHER
Aug 12, 2018
Probation
Can't post for 15 days!


Shimrra Jamaane posted:

END OF SERIES SPOILERS

So what will be the takes of Pete arguably having the happiest ending out of anyone except maybe Joan?

I always interpreted that as once Pete gave up the dream and obligation of being a successful and handsome New York or Los Angeles playboy he would be more at peace with his life. Too bad he’s a rapist though.

ANOTHER SCORCHER
Aug 12, 2018
Probation
Can't post for 15 days!


I do think the way Mad Men portrays the culturally conservative characters (Cooper, Roger, Don to some extent) is much more loving even if the narrative suggests they're wrong than the way it portrays counter-cultural characters, which is often actively disdainful. Midge and her beatnik friends are mostly frauds and losers, owned by cool Season 1 Don Draper. Midge ends up as heroin addict with some random dude, rather than the guy competing for her affections with Don! Paul is a prototypical early archetype of a "virtue signaling sjw". Abe is portrayed with more complexity, though he is presented as misogynistic despite being socially conscious the first time we meet him. But ultimately he gets discarded so Peggy can pursue her girlboss aspirations without having to live in a lovely part of town. Ginsberg literally goes insane. Stephanie Horton is a deadbeat mother. Margaret Sterling is a deadbeat mother.

This works for a tragic reading of the show, but I know that is not the one everyone takes away. All of the 60s counterculture comes to naught except that which Don can integrate into himself to sell poison water.

ANOTHER SCORCHER
Aug 12, 2018
Probation
Can't post for 15 days!


GoutPatrol posted:

Even then, the show at the end also shows you were the conservative movement in the United States is going with the Carnation meeting in California. When the guy is banging on the table saying Nixon is weak and we need a real leader like Reagan to clean up this place (much like our instant breakfast is clean and pure) and Don and Roger both kinda give each other a side eye. There is a difference to their "just count the money and go with the flow" Northeast, Rockefeller Republicans, and the people that will take over the party by 1980. You see this with Connie in season 3 as well. Real conservative America is Bottom with a donkey head, and they're getting tired of the Northeast elites making fun of them. And they'll show 'em.

And I guess one other thing. Roger keeps complaining that he can't talk to Connie, only Don can. SO WHO INVITED CONNIE TO THE loving DERBY PARTY IN THE FIRST PLACE.

This is a fair response that I had not considered. I suppose the ethos of the show is that ideologues in general are idiots or frauds, the only thing that matters is turning yourself into the perfect career-climbing, money-making neoliberal subject.

ANOTHER SCORCHER
Aug 12, 2018
Probation
Can't post for 15 days!


Last post about the ending on my part, since I don't want to fill the thread with black bars and I appreciate Jerusalem's analysis so there's value on keeping focus on wherever they're at.

Gaius Marius posted:

Also to know one in particular, some of you guys have the most depressing views of the ending I've ever seen. I'm gonna actually have to sit and analyze it when we get there, In my opinion it's one of the most uplifting and liberating moments in TV history and what Sets Mad Men ahead of the Likes of Sopranos and Breaking Bad.

I want to say that I love Mad Men, it is one of my all-time favorite shows. The tension between the genuine personal progression for Don and the ultimate fate of what that will be used for is an unwitting statement on the prison we're all trapped in. Matthew Weiner definitely saw the ending as hopeful and has described the Coke as genuinely uplifting. As I've mentioned before, to me Mad Men perfectly encapsulates the Bush to Obama transitory era in which it was made where the hope was that America and the people (but mostly men) who run it could become better - more sensitive, kinder to women, more accepting of minorities. Whether you still believe those things: a Coke ad can be an artistic expression of hope and American can be made good will affect your read on the ending.

Funny thought: Don Draper pitches the BLM Pepsi ad from a few years back.

ANOTHER SCORCHER
Aug 12, 2018
Probation
Can't post for 15 days!


Your read on Paul here is 100% dead-on, Jerusalem. He's realizing that it isn't Peggy's relationship with Don or her femininity that makes her better at the job than him but that he just does not have what it takes. Paul keeps trying these big grand ideas - Marilyn or Jackie, his long Aqua Net story, his incredible forgotten idea. That just is not what the job is, and Don and Peggy do a much better job of cutting a story down to the essential message necessary to sell a product to a customer. Paul just cannot do that, because he imagines himself as a tortured artist and is trying to do something totally different.

Also the sequence with Betty trying to plan an ambush on Don with the information she now knows is such a perfect example of why Mad Men is a great show. Most other programs would have given her her big dramatic moment, but in this one all she gets is dissatisfaction.

ANOTHER SCORCHER
Aug 12, 2018
Probation
Can't post for 15 days!


Yoshi Wins posted:

I wonder at exactly what point he decided to pretend it never happened. I used to think he decided in the office the next day, a last-second moment of cowardice, but when he tells her to leave the door open, I think he's deliberately trying to prevent her from becoming openly emotional. Which, yikes.

Yes, and it also prevents her from asking any questions or talking openly about what happened between them because with the door open she has to respect his position and worry about her own reputation. Don did not take advantage of their power difference to have sex - but he does to render that sex inconsequential (for him, at least).

ANOTHER SCORCHER
Aug 12, 2018
Probation
Can't post for 15 days!


Xealot posted:

Which seems like an unnecessary distinction to try and make. His power over her necessarily influenced the how and why they had sex, regardless of how oblivious he was to that or how enthusiastic she was or wasn't. As attractive as Don Draper might be, he's also the most important figure in the new firm, and the sole gatekeeper to Allison's success or failure there. "No" probably seemed like a non-option for her even if she wanted to believe the encounter meant something.

But certainly, after the fact, her silence is something Don was banking on and the methods he uses to do that are deliberate and awful to watch. The cash bonus, in particular, is loving rough. You'd think a person with any empathy at all would realize how horrendous that looks, say something like, "I'm sorry, I meant to give you this the other day, and now it feels inappropriate." But S4 Don Draper is a goddamn rear end in a top hat, acting out because of his divorce and causing collateral damage all around.

His power over her as her boss fulfills a society-wide romantic fantasy, as disturbing as that may be. The distinction isn't "unnecessary" (which is different from incorrect) because the whole point is that the fantasy of marrying your boss as a secretary produces way more Allisons than it does Janes or Megans.

Edit: Done re: below.

ANOTHER SCORCHER fucked around with this message at 00:54 on May 25, 2021

ANOTHER SCORCHER
Aug 12, 2018
Probation
Can't post for 15 days!


pentyne posted:

Betty talks about how Don doesn't understand money, and boy does he really show it when thinking he can use his money to solve problems.

When his brother showed up, his only game plan was "here's as much money as I can get, go away".

I didn't even connect the two, thank you.

Notably he also does this to Megan in the divorce, writes her a huge check. And of course when Lane tries the same thing, although using company money, Don harangues him for it which results in his suicide.

Edit: Megan also does this to Stephanie, which irks Don even though he never actually finds out about it.

ANOTHER SCORCHER
Aug 12, 2018
Probation
Can't post for 15 days!


Yoshi Wins posted:

Finally, I want to touch on the Muhammad Ali thing a bit. I do think that Don's problems with Ali do have to do with race. But he does actually have a problem with white athletes acting cocky as well. He mentions that he specifically dislikes Joe Namath, whose persona was just as full of swagger as Ali's (although Ali actually backed it up--Namath was actually a mediocre quarterback). And Don has been consistent about believing people shouldn't talk about themselves much, and that he doesn't believe in it, so it does make sense that he would have some distaste for Ali even if he were white.

...Which is why that "MOO-HAMMAD ALI" that Hamm delivers is so perfect. The contempt and the dismissiveness he conveys are so perfect, so revealing. He dislikes Joe Namath, but he can't stand Ali. Good storytelling.

I want to mention that in addition to the racial politics which undergird this whole thing, Muhammad Ali is someone who took on a different name and, in some respects, identity publicly as a counter-cultural action against the dominant culture. Don did the exact opposite thing when he became Don Draper - he dropped his subaltern identity as a poor hillbilly to become the ideal successful 50s white man. This tension obviously permeates the episode, with the last person who knows anything substantive about Don's real identity dying and him giving Peggy a tiny little bit of information about it. To Don, an alias is a tool to hide and assimilate, not to stand out.

ANOTHER SCORCHER
Aug 12, 2018
Probation
Can't post for 15 days!


I'm wary of simply seeing Joan as a victim who cannot adapt rather than someone who has constructed their own power network - as a response to and defensive tool against patriarchy - who is now threatened by creation of a formalized organizational structure and the advance of human resources-style management. Joan's role as "Head Secretary" is vastly more than the description, she essentially functions as Director of Personnel and Assistant CFO for an up-and-coming multi-million dollar ad agency. She's done all that, despite the patriarchal society she lives in, by creating a network of soft power that gives her abilities and strengths beyond those in formal processes. She can't fire anyone (except secretaries) but she suggests she could have gotten rid of Joey if she wanted to. Even among the men, Sterling Cooper was run through nepotism and informal power to some extent.

Peggy's dressing down and ultimate firing of Joey after the generous offer that he need only apologize details the approach of modern HR and personnel management which would formalize how managers and employees relate to each other. Managers often resist these efforts, but it especially threatens Joan, who lacks an actual, formal role or position in the organization that fits her outsize influence.

ANOTHER SCORCHER
Aug 12, 2018
Probation
Can't post for 15 days!


I actually thought Don was overreacting to the likelihood he would be found out - we've never seen a Draper family member come looking for him, Anna is dead, Betty covered. Even the age thing, would it really be that weird for an ad man to lie about his age and presumably say he's younger than he really is? Pete saying he hadn't been flagged yet seemed to support this idea.

ANOTHER SCORCHER
Aug 12, 2018
Probation
Can't post for 15 days!


Don's reaction is perfectly in character, maybe even more so if the danger was not as serious as he thought.

ANOTHER SCORCHER
Aug 12, 2018
Probation
Can't post for 15 days!


This episode really represents a turning point for Don and thus the United States as a whole. Midge in many ways is the counter-culture, at one point Don saw her and her lover as being more authentic if poor and broke and so left them to their own devices. Now they are heroin junkies and Don uses their struggle to sell loving advertisements. This is the first moment when the culmination of Mad Men is visible in the distant horizon. Don’s anti-smoking campaign is obviously the first blow in a pre-“woke” social justice style branding moment that will, within a few decades, be the only remaining marketing move left. That this occurs precisely when the actual counter-culture movement represented by Midge crashes up against the rock of reality is very telling.

ANOTHER SCORCHER
Aug 12, 2018
Probation
Can't post for 15 days!


This is a great episode because Don really does listen to Faye's advice and take a big step forward in making peace with himself - he brings his children to Anna's home and tells them about her and his "nickname". That he would couple this with a tremendous step backwards as a psychological counterbalance makes sense.

ANOTHER SCORCHER
Aug 12, 2018
Probation
Can't post for 15 days!



Haha check this thread out for a lot of edgy 2010-style humor, a pedophile mod reacting every minute, and goons almost unanimously missing the point of the episode and complaining.

ANOTHER SCORCHER
Aug 12, 2018
Probation
Can't post for 15 days!


Betty went to Bryn Mawr, which is an elite women-only school. Not sure where Megan went. I do enjoy how immediately you can place her friends as unlike Don and his crowd without too much being said except for Harry’s jibes.

ANOTHER SCORCHER
Aug 12, 2018
Probation
Can't post for 15 days!


The dream sequence feels like an attempt to say something about the connection between erotic desire and violence, but it’s just too clumsy to successfully pull it off. Given the other plotlines are about a rapist murderer scaring multiple women characters and Joan finally confronting Greg and all.

ANOTHER SCORCHER
Aug 12, 2018
Probation
Can't post for 15 days!


ohkay posted:

- Big agencies do always win. Huge corporations hire huge corporations… no surprise. Every now and then you get “edgier” clients signing on with seemingly staid agencies like mine for the perceived credibility, e.g. cannabis companies, a certain beleaguered vape company, etc., but never the other way around. It’s basically impossible to imagine a scrappy independent agency like SCDP working its way up to winning a car company today… my company has a bunch, and wins more car business because it has more car business.

- This is because industry is dominated by just five holding companies that own hundreds of agencies each. In this day and age, McCann and SC would just be two separate agencies belonging to IPG.

This is definitely a theme in the remaining two seasons, as SCDP merges with CGC and then becomes more specialized in computerized media data analysis, before being eaten up by McCann.

ANOTHER SCORCHER
Aug 12, 2018
Probation
Can't post for 15 days!


Vitruvian Manic posted:

You folks know all he is doing is a shot-for-shot on the episodes.

Like, you can do that on your own and just rewatch.

I’ve rewatched Mad Men enough, I need someone else to do it and give me their thoughts.

ANOTHER SCORCHER
Aug 12, 2018
Probation
Can't post for 15 days!


DaveWoo posted:

Yeah, Stan's evolution feels pretty natural. The weirder character shift for me is Ted Chaough - he's introduced in Season 4 as an rear end in a top hat, but then we see him again in Season 5 and he's suddenly a decent guy.

Isn't he only an rear end in a top hat to Don, who is the professional rival he's gunning after? It makes sense he would behave differently among those who know him.

ANOTHER SCORCHER
Aug 12, 2018
Probation
Can't post for 15 days!


In 1967 Heinz Bean would launch a new ad campaign with their "Beanz Meanz Heinz" commercial that became the most memorable and celebrated slogan for Heinz Beans.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F_i3AlMCEjw

Meanwhile, Heinz Ketchup's 1968 ad campaign "The Slowest Ketchup in the West" would be a western pastiche that played on the thick and slow nature of Heinz as compared to the other (presumably more watery/saucy) catsup sauces on the market.

https://adland.tv/adnews/heinz-race-slowest-ketchup-west-1968-60-usa

Beanz Meanz Heinz did become a big deal, but it should be clear that both Don and Peggy's ideas were better for the ketchup than their historical equivalent. Despite how much work Mad Men does to make the 1960s setting important it is funny to see how dated actual ad campaigns from that period seem to modern eyes and ears compared to the on-camera presentations.

ANOTHER SCORCHER
Aug 12, 2018
Probation
Can't post for 15 days!


Ungratek posted:

This is the second time this season Don pitches an ad that doesn't actually feature the product. He's completely tied up in what he wants, and not what the client wants.

His Hilton ad was probably the first iteration of this idea and it failed with Connie despite their entangled relationship. Don chasing this aesthetic idea of minimalism despite losing again and again is funny given how otherwise adaptable he is.

ANOTHER SCORCHER
Aug 12, 2018
Probation
Can't post for 15 days!


kalel posted:

Don draper is a philandering alcoholic deserter who abuses everyone around him and doesn't give a gently caress about his children, but as depressing as his arc has been this season, it can't compare with the disappointment of Peggy becoming a goddamned landlord

Adds more context to Abe breaking up with her because she’s everything he hates. Also, given the ultimate moral of the show is that finding yourself to better sell diabetes water made by death squads is good I’m not sure the show wants you to read it as a bad thing.

ANOTHER SCORCHER
Aug 12, 2018
Probation
Can't post for 15 days!


Tokaii was an older goon posting here in the oughts who had been a police officer in Chicago during the 60s and made ask-me-anything type posts about it.

Tokaii in 2004 posted:

The riots of 1968. You don't exactly get the big picture when you're in the middle of it. I was in part of Chicago PD called Task Force and we were usually assigned to flood high crime areas, etc. We were the first to be called out when Dr. King was killed. Before long though the entire department was on 12 hour shifts. Once the riots really got going we'd be put on a bus and driven close to the scene and then assemble, move out and try to clear an area. It was pretty hopeless for the most part. We'd clear a block but they'd just move two blocks over. It seemed like everywhere you looked the building were either on fire or had been broken into and looted.

The night I mentioned just stands out in my memory because it was so surreal. I'd been down west Madison (this is ghetto prime) many times but it seemed like a different world. There were flames all over the place because firemen were being fired on and so had to pull out. There was, as I said, a cloud of black smoke hanging over the whole area. The block immediately in front of us was pretty empty because we'd assembled a couple blocks away from the action but it looked like a huge mob just beyond that. We only had enough guys to form one single line across the street and I'm sure I wasn't the only one wondering what would happen if they stood and fought. They didn't though and it was more a matter of grabbing the worst one you could find and pushing him back toward the wagons. He caught a lot of hell for it, but I think Mayor Daly's "Shoot to kill looters and arsonists" order may have put enough fear into them to keep them off us.

Mostly I remember moments of fear, moments of adrenalin rush, and hours of tiredness.

I think he eventually got banned for saying it would be okay for an adult to have sex with a 16-year-old.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

ANOTHER SCORCHER
Aug 12, 2018
Probation
Can't post for 15 days!


Jerusalem posted:

"I'll pay for it all," Don IMMEDIATELY declares, putting up zero fight, protest or even register of surprise. His lizard brain has immediately gone,"THAT'LL PUT HER OUT OF THE PICTURE!" and he has grasped at it as greedily as he's picked up his now empty bottle of vodka, more interested in his own self-preservation than repaired the tattered remains of his relationship with a daughter who once worshiped the ground he walked on.

Great review as always Jerusalem, though I think this bit is an uncharitable read. Don isn't trying to put Sally out of the picture, he's trying to do what he always does with problems and *fix it with money*. He recognizes that he has deeply wronged Sally and wants to correct that, but obviously cannot speak to her about it and ask for forgiveness because that would acknowledge it happened, treat her as an equal human being, and probably require some sort of correction towards Megan. So wants to throw some money at the issue - like he did with Adam and others.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply