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HugeGrossBurrito
Mar 20, 2018




A geologist and cartographer in 1902 decided to find why as many place in the US were named what they were named, and published this book. There is some weird, funny, and interesting poo poo in here and I have barely started looking at it. If you think a place existed before 1902, I'll look it up, there are a lot east of the Mississippi but there's plenty in the west too. It's interesting to see explanations from over 100 years ago and some of the info that's in this book doesn't seem to exist online. I expect to run into places that don't exist anymore.







Here's a few I found so far that I thought were interesting.

Anthony’s Nose; promontory on the Hudson River, New York, said by Irving to have been named so in reference to Anthony Van Corlear’s nose; Lossing says, “Anthony de Hooges, secretary of Rensselaerwick, had an enormous nose, and the promontory was named in honor of that feature.”

Aswaguscawadic; branch of the Mattawamkeag River, Maine. An Indian word, meaning “a place where one is compelled to drag his canoe through a stream.”

Cattaraugus; county, village, and creek in New York. Indian word, meaning “bad smelling shore or beach.”

Kickapoo; town, in Peoria County, Illinois, Anderson County, Texas, and Leavenworth County, Kansas. An Indian word, meaning “easily navigable,” or according to another authority, “ghost of an otter.”

Manhattan; an island in New York. An Indian word, said by some authorities to mean “little island;” others think it means “the people of the whirlpool,” referring to Hell Gate, and another authority gives its origin as from the word Manna-ha-ta, “place of drunkenness,” since Verrazani landed upon the lower extremity of Manhattan Island and gave the Indians liquor, on which they became drunk.

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EorayMel
May 29, 2015

You got the fluffy kitty kitty!


You must turn to page and discover the origins of the places there (if there is such a page)

HugeGrossBurrito
Mar 20, 2018




EorayMel posted:

You must turn to page and discover the origins of the places there (if there is such a page)

Of course

TeachesOfPeaches
Jan 25, 2019

fuck the pain away





BurritoWife here, so I have also been randomly looking through this book and can help with the looking up of things. One amusing entry I found this morning was for Pensacola, which is 'Said to be derived from the Indian word Pan-sha-okla, meaning "hair people."'

Living on the east coast of the US means most place names are derived from either Native American words, or England. It's interesting to find out what the actual words mean.

Vincent Valentine
Feb 28, 2006

Murdertime



69 is only the Cs?

What's on 420?

What's the deal with Badwater, California? I mean, the name sounds pretty self explanatory, but the book sounds like it has history and not just translation on some of them so I'm really hoping there's a particularly lovely water hole that someone drank from and was like "DANG, this water is bad, let's settle here. Call it Badwater, cause gently caress dude." or maybe they all came from Goodsprings and just hated their old town.

Big Beef City
Aug 15, 2013
Probation
Can't post for 15 days!


"Chefunct: An indian word meaning 'Chinkapin'". Oh, well thanks.

Also it's funny that in Michigan there's the place called 'Cheboygan' and right across the lake in Wisconsin, there's one called 'Sheboygan'

TeachesOfPeaches
Jan 25, 2019

fuck the pain away





Vincent Valentine posted:

69 is only the Cs?

What's on 420?

What's the deal with Badwater, California? I mean, the name sounds pretty self explanatory, but the book sounds like it has history and not just translation on some of them so I'm really hoping there's a particularly lovely water hole that someone drank from and was like "DANG, this water is bad, let's settle here. Call it Badwater, cause gently caress dude." or maybe they all came from Goodsprings and just hated their old town.

Yeah, it's in alphabetical order. Unfortunately there is no page 420

Badwater, CA is not in the book, but the description for the Bad Lands in South Dakota is interesting: 'It is said that the old French voyageurs described the region as "mauvaise terres pour traverser," meaning that it was a difficult country to travel through; from this the term has been carelessly shortened and translated into the present misnomer.'

So maybe Badwater had a longer and more descriptive name in Spanish or something that included the term 'agua mal' and it got butchered into Badwater.

TeachesOfPeaches
Jan 25, 2019

fuck the pain away





Big Beef City posted:

"Chefunct: An indian word meaning 'Chinkapin'". Oh, well thanks.

Lol. For what it's worth, 'Chinquapin' is apparently the Indian name for "nut," or "small chestnut"

edit: Regarding the use of of the term 'Indian,' the US government actually still uses this term to define reservations. For example, Navajo Nation Reservation is officially a 'Federal American Indian Reservation.' I personally use 'Native American,' but I would guess that the terminology used in this book was probably the official government standard when it was published, and does not necessarily indicate the preference of the author himself.

TeachesOfPeaches fucked around with this message at 15:01 on Sep 26, 2020

Hell Yeah
Dec 25, 2012



Shadow0
Jun 16, 2008


Grimey Drawer

I remember learning about the Kickapoo Indians in middle school since I grew up near that town. Top tier tribe name imo.

Can you look up Toad Suck, Arkansas?

Big Beef City
Aug 15, 2013
Probation
Can't post for 15 days!


I always thought Badwater meant the place had really lovely springs/available drinking water/don't water your horses here they'll get sick.

Telsa Cola
Aug 19, 2011

No... this is all wrong... this whole operation has just gone completely sidewaysface


Are Molly's Nipples in there? Should be in Utah.

TeachesOfPeaches
Jan 25, 2019

fuck the pain away





Toad Suck and Molly's Nipples don't have entries, which is too bad because those are both hilarious place names. Maybe the author was a prude!

Julias
Jun 24, 2012




Could you look up California, Pennsylvania? Always wondered about that one.

twoday
May 4, 2005




Is the Murderkill river in there?

TeachesOfPeaches
Jan 25, 2019

fuck the pain away





Julias posted:

Could you look up California, Pennsylvania? Always wondered about that one.

The book doesn't acknowledge California, PA specifically, but the entry for California does mention that "eight post-offices bear this name." There is also a California, Maryland.

Here is the full description: "California; one of the States of the Union. This name was applied by Cortez to the bay and country, which he supposed to be an island. The name is that of an island in an old Spanish romance, where a great abundance of precious stones were found. Eight post-offices bear this name."

TeachesOfPeaches
Jan 25, 2019

fuck the pain away





twoday posted:

Is the Murderkill river in there?

Nope, but Murder is: "creek in Genessee County, New York, so named because the body of a man who was supposed to have been murdered was found in the stream." cool cool

Jose
Jul 24, 2007



why is so much stuff in the US named gaylord

Universe Master
Jun 20, 2005

Darn Fine Pie



"Dr. Peter Wilson, an educated Seneca"

TeachesOfPeaches
Jan 25, 2019

fuck the pain away





Jose posted:

why is so much stuff in the US named gaylord

Apparently it's a common last name, as the two entries for it suggest:

"Gaylord; city in Smith County, Kansas, named for C.E. Gaylord, of Marshall County."

"Gaylord; village in Otsego County, Michigan, named for an attorney of the Michigan Central Railroad."

Not nearly as exciting as I would have hoped.

Johnny Aztec
Jan 29, 2005

Set Phasers to FUN!

That begs the question: WHY is "Gaylord" a common last name?

Yes, I know that it is a fairly modern take on the word, but nonetheless, I am curious as to it's origins.

Shadow0
Jun 16, 2008


Grimey Drawer

Readers of this thread might enjoy this Wiki article:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Place...ual?wprov=sfla1

TeachesOfPeaches posted:

Yeah, it's in alphabetical order. Unfortunately there is no page 420

Badwater, CA is not in the book, but the description for the Bad Lands in South Dakota is interesting: 'It is said that the old French voyageurs described the region as "mauvaise terres pour traverser," meaning that it was a difficult country to travel through; from this the term has been carelessly shortened and translated into the present misnomer.'

So maybe Badwater had a longer and more descriptive name in Spanish or something that included the term 'agua mal' and it got butchered into Badwater.

A lot of town are named after other foreign towns or in foreign languages, so I wouldn't be surprised if some of the "Bad X" towns are named so because of German.

https://german.stackexchange.com/qu...%20authorities.

Johnny Aztec
Jan 29, 2005

Set Phasers to FUN!

Shadow0 posted:

Readers of this thread might enjoy this Wiki article:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Place...ual?wprov=sfla1


A lot of town are named after other foreign towns or in foreign languages, so I wouldn't be surprised if some of the "Bad X" towns are named so because of German.

https://german.stackexchange.com/qu...%20authorities.

I have always enjoyed the "Translated" names of places that end up being stupid.
Like, The Sahara Desert. Sahara is a word for Desert. So it's the Desert Desert.

Or the baseball team The Los Angeles Angels.

Julias
Jun 24, 2012




Jose posted:

why is so much stuff in the US named gaylord

Probably because there once was a happy lord...

HugeGrossBurrito
Mar 20, 2018




so many of these are French names that just lost their meaning entirely. Green Bay for instance was la grande baie

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




I have always been very curious about Buckatunna, Mississippi and Burnt Corn, Alabama

E:

TeachesOfPeaches posted:

Nope, but Murder is: "creek in Genessee County, New York, so named because the body of a man who was supposed to have been murdered was found in the stream." cool cool
IIRC -kill as a suffix is a Dutch thing that means a creek or marsh or inlet and shows up in a lot of areas of Dutch settlement-as in fishkill, schuykill

Kaiser Schnitzel fucked around with this message at 17:31 on Sep 26, 2020

HugeGrossBurrito
Mar 20, 2018




Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

I have always been very curious about Buckatunna, Mississippi and Burnt Corn, Alabama

E:

IIRC -kill as a suffix is a Dutch thing that means a creek or marsh or inlet and shows up in a lot of areas of Dutch settlement-as in fishkill, schuykill

Buckatunna- Choctaw word meaning a creek where there is weaving.

Burnt Corn doesn't seem to be in the book, but it it seems like native Americans and settlers were burning the poo poo out of eachothers corn and a lot of battles happened there.

HugeGrossBurrito
Mar 20, 2018




Found an interesting one, Mobjack, Maryland it doesn't exist anymore and but is also the name for a bay in Virginia. The defunct Maryland city or maybe just a small port? is named it because, a pirate named Jack was mobbed and thrown overboard by his crew at the site. The Virginia bay "appears in early documents as "Mockjack Bay"; it was said that echoes on the bay would mock "Jack", a term for a sailor. Captain Thomas Todd of Toddsbury, Gloucester County, a mid seventeenth century emigrant, was recorded as "Thomas Todd of Mockjack Bay".

Laslow
Jul 18, 2007



Just some general observations from my immediate area, the gulf barrier islands and Tampa Bay, Florida.

I already know the name of Treasure Island, Florida is only half true. Those FUCks on the city council refuse to correct this because they’re all like “the treasure is its natural beauty” which is just some crap to feed tourists. If there isn’t any ACTUAL treasure then change the name and you’d save some people a LOT of time. Like if there WAS treasure but it has long since been found, I still feel it’s dishonest. Sorry, I need to save the energy, that’s pretty much my platform when I run for mayor though.

Clearwater Beach doesn’t make any sense because the water is more like an green/blue.

Caladesi Island isn’t even an island. It’s an island only sometimes. It depends on which direction the last hurricane reamed us from, so when it was named, it could have been an island maybe idk.

Ybor City isn’t a city at all, it’s a ghetto with some restaurants. Still relatively upscale buying your heroin there instead of MLK/Nebraska Ave. Like you gotta know someone, you can’t just show up and score, we got kids in the neighborhood and stuff, damnit.

Ugly In The Morning
Jul 1, 2010

Don't look at me-
I'm ugly in the morning
When the headaches gone
The sun is not.
Forgot to turn the alarm
On - on




Pillbug

Can you look up Poughkeepsie for me? I’m figuring it’s some Native tribe’s word for “really boring place, oh my god, so boring”.

Vincent Van Goatse
Nov 8, 2006

Don't be so gloomy. After all it's not that awful. Like the fella says, in Italy for thirty years under the Borgias they had warfare, terror, murder, and bloodshed, but they produced Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, and the Renaissance.






Smellrose

Reform, Alabama

HugeGrossBurrito
Mar 20, 2018




Ugly In The Morning posted:

Can you look up Poughkeepsie for me? I’m figuring it’s some Native tribe’s word for “really boring place, oh my god, so boring”.

Derived from a Delaware Indian word, apokeepsingk meaning safe and pleasant harbor or shallow inlet safe harbor for small boats. So yeah pretty much.

extra row of teeth
Apr 27, 2007

Float like a butterfly, sting like a Beerus


Matawan? The local legend/in-joke was it was Native American for "stinky river" because Matawan Creek was loving gross.

TeachesOfPeaches
Jan 25, 2019

fuck the pain away





extra row of teeth posted:

Matawan? The local legend/in-joke was it was Native American for "stinky river" because Matawan Creek was loving gross.

'Matawan; town in Monmouth County, New Jersey. An Indian word to which various meanings are ascribed, among them "magician," "charmed skin," "it arrives in a lake."' Maybe by "it" they meant a horrible smell...

HugeGrossBurrito
Mar 20, 2018





Reform was informally named Pickens, the name of the county until a Methodist missionary held a revival in the town. The town didn’t give a poo poo about his revival. He left town in anger yelling at them to reform, and a likely in-joke among the residents stuck. This was pieced together from a few places but it seems to be the legend so to speak.

HugeGrossBurrito
Mar 20, 2018




That minister I assume was a distant relative of Doobie considering the town’s reaction to his hot dogs.

Into The Mild
Mar 4, 2003

For you the day Duke graced your club was the most important day of your life but for me, it was Tuesday


Hey TeachesOfPeaches. I’m told you find the way I say Effort Post is funny.

grill youre saelf
Jan 22, 2006
I use my real name, because I'm cool like that.


"WISCONSIN RAPIDS, WI"

if that doesn't work "STEVENS POINT, WI"

thank you for owning an old book and doing this

(these town names are hard to figure out)

free hubcaps
Oct 12, 2009


whoa whoa....HGB has a wife?!?!

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TeachesOfPeaches
Jan 25, 2019

fuck the pain away





Into The Mild posted:

Hey TeachesOfPeaches. I’m told you find the way I say Effort Post is funny.

I literally read this post in your accent.

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