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corgski
Feb 6, 2007




Welcome to Fix It Fast, the thread where you can get help fixing things. Fast!

The previous iteration of this thread is here!

We have several megathreads that may be able to offer faster or more in-depth answers for common household issues:
This is not an exhaustive list of the megathreads in this forum, if there's one you feel should be added to the OP, please PM me!

corgski fucked around with this message at 06:23 on Oct 18, 2020

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corgski
Feb 6, 2007




Offsite Resources: (Please PM me to report broken links and submit new sites)

General:
  • Popular Mechanics: How-To-Central - Has a few great tutorials for free. Also the home-journal section has some interesting articles.
  • Make Magazine - An awesome site for projects both large and small, and advice on how to reuse broken devices to make fun new items.
  • Instructables - Really good DIY website with a good layout. Tons of stuff.
  • Craftster - a huge crafting forum filled with lots of tutorials on just about everything

Home:
  • Fixitnow.com - Great advice and information on how to diagnose and repair home appliances.
  • Bob Vila's - website on home improvement, with video guides. Mostly little tips, but useful.
  • This Old House - You've seen the show, this is their site. Very commercial, but useful tips and well written articles.
  • Repair Clinic - Repair parts for appliances, diagrams, and manuals!
  • Ask the builder - Short video guides and walkthroughs. Mostly links to youtube videos.

Electronics:
  • Nuts and Volts - Mid-grade electronics tinkering, this has some great project ideas and is a great resource for your up and coming mad scientist.
  • 68kMLA - Retrocomputing forum specializing in old Apple products but with a skilled and active hardware hacking scene, including guides for repairing old CRTs.
  • EEVBlog Forum - Electronics greybeards discussing electronic things, for intermediate skill levels and above.

Sewing:

corgski fucked around with this message at 17:42 on Oct 18, 2020

corgski
Feb 6, 2007




Highlights!

Mutata's Drywall Patching Guide

corgski fucked around with this message at 17:12 on Oct 19, 2020

TraderStav
May 19, 2006

It feels like I was standing my entire life and I just sat down


Love this thread despite rarely posting in it!

Someone just mentioned repairclinic.com and I'm so blessed to be 25 minutes from there so can do same day repairs on all my poo poo at cheap prices.

corgski
Feb 6, 2007




Thanks! I just went through the offsite resource list from the old OP and pruned all the 404 errors and ad search landing pages, so any and all resources you can suggest are appreciated!

H110Hawk
Dec 28, 2006


Subtly misleading people into the future!

Dr. Habibi
Sep 24, 2009



Fallen Rib

Just about fainted when the Awful app had the old one greyed out.

The fix it fast thread is dead, long live the fix it fast thread!

tater_salad
Sep 15, 2007


Pick 2

You can fix it fast, cheap or good.

stealie72
Jan 10, 2007

Their eyes locked and suddenly there was the sound of breaking glass.


tater_salad posted:

Pick 2

You can fix it fast, cheap or good.

Except for times when you can only pick 1.

TraderStav
May 19, 2006

It feels like I was standing my entire life and I just sat down


corgski posted:

Thanks! I just went through the offsite resource list from the old OP and pruned all the 404 errors and ad search landing pages, so any and all resources you can suggest are appreciated!

I would actually recommend adding in RepairClinic's site. You can add your appliance model number and troubleshoot your issue, and they have videos on how to do that as well as repair/replace to resolve. Great resource.

corgski
Feb 6, 2007




Already in there, TraderStav!

Rooster Brooster
Mar 30, 2001

Maybe it doesn't really matter anymore.

Bookmarked! I'm always amazed at the quality of help this thread gives, and how quickly. Thanks to everyone who participates!

actionjackson
Jan 12, 2003





several of my cabinets doors are not straight, in this example the first one does touch the frame at the top, whereas the second one works great (the door is very straight, and the bumpers on top and bottom both touch the frame). I tried adding a few more rubber bumpers to the first one towards the bottom but it didn't help. I assume the noise is the reverb from the top part that doesn't touch.

https://i.imgur.com/WB71l7w.mp4

what's the best way to deal with this? maybe there are rubber bumpers that stick out more? or would new soft-close hinges resolve the issue?

PainterofCrap
Oct 17, 2002

Hey bebe





actionjackson posted:

several of my cabinets doors are not straight, in this example the first one does touch the frame at the top, whereas the second one works great (the door is very straight, and the bumpers on top and bottom both touch the frame). I tried adding a few more rubber bumpers to the first one towards the bottom but it didn't help. I assume the noise is the reverb from the top part that doesn't touch.

https://i.imgur.com/WB71l7w.mp4

what's the best way to deal with this? maybe there are rubber bumpers that stick out more? or would new soft-close hinges resolve the issue?

Those hinges are adjustable.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

actionjackson posted:

what's the best way to deal with this? maybe there are rubber bumpers that stick out more? or would new soft-close hinges resolve the issue?

Hidden hinges like that are adjustable in several directions. All you need is a phillips head.

tangy yet delightful
Sep 13, 2005





Is it just me or does the face of that door look warped?

actionjackson
Jan 12, 2003





PainterofCrap posted:

Those hinges are adjustable.

you know I looked these up, they appear to be an old version of the blum compact 33, but even for the current ones all I saw was height adjustment (using the screw that's on the edge mount in this case) and side to side adjustment (using a screw that this hinge doesn't have) in the manual. what am I missing here?

what I really want is for the top of the door to be closer to the frame, which would mean an adjustment to the left in this picture

Only registered members can see post attachments!

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

actionjackson posted:

you know I looked these up, they appear to be an old version of the blum compact 33, but even for the current ones all I saw was height adjustment (using the screw that's on the edge mount in this case) and side to side adjustment (using a screw that this hinge doesn't have) in the manual. what am I missing here?

what I really want is for the top of the door to be closer to the frame, which would mean an adjustment to the left in this picture



Ewwww...those are super cheap. Sorry, I've never seen them without other adjustments. Like, even Ikea stuff comes with that.

There still may be some slop in the "height" adjustment part that would allow you to "tilt" so get the top closed up more. It's worth slightly loosening the screws on the fixed side of the cabinet and then closing the door to see if you can move it into a position that you like better. If you can, just snug them up enough to kinda hold it in place, close and position by tapping or whatever and then carefully open and tighten them up.

PainterofCrap
Oct 17, 2002

Hey bebe





You might be able to bend the tang between the stile (edge) mount and the door mount to suck 'em in a little.

If that fails, grab a couple sets of one of the upgrade styles & see if you can't fit them.

PainterofCrap fucked around with this message at 21:57 on Oct 18, 2020

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

PainterofCrap posted:

You might be able to bend the tang between the stile (edge) mount and the door mount to suck 'em in a little.

Yeah, that's a good idea but nuanced. Needle nose vise grips to do it just a hair at a time maybe.

actionjackson
Jan 12, 2003





yeah a lot of stuff in here is cheap crap

even on the newer hinges, the additional screw would just allow left to right adjustment as you are looking at the front of the door. I don't think the type of adjustment I actually need exists, which would be akin to moving the part attached to the frame left or right instead of up or down.

in this pic, I can do the height adjustment, but I don't have the screw to do the side adjustment (but again, I don't need that adjustment anyway).

PainterofCrap posted:

You might be able to bend the tang between the stile (edge) mount and the door mount to suck 'em in a little.

If that fails, grab a couple sets of one of the upgrade styles & see if you can't fit them.

what do you mean by this? i only know tang as a kool-aid competitor

Only registered members can see post attachments!

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

actionjackson posted:

what do you mean by this? i only know tang as a kool-aid competitor



Pinch like this with preferably needle nose vise grips so you can use the screw on the vise grip to control how much you go in at each time.

actionjackson
Jan 12, 2003





Motronic posted:



Pinch like this with preferably needle nose vise grips so you can use the screw on the vise grip to control how much you go in at each time.

ah that makes sense thx

as an alternative, would using a clamp that holds the part of the cabinet door that doesn't touch (like the upper part in my video) to the frame help?

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

actionjackson posted:

as an alternative, would using a clamp that holds the part of the cabinet door that doesn't touch (like the upper part in my video) to the frame help?

Doubt it. Whatever your cabinet door is made of isn't going to be stiff enough to bend those hinges. Also, those metal hinges have springback. You'll crank that joint in and it will expand back out. Hoever you bend it, you need to be able to bend it PAST where it need to stay. You can't do that with the door shut.

actionjackson
Jan 12, 2003





it looks like blum does have a hinge that allows you to adjust on the third dimension (closer to and further away from the cabinet frame), but it's in their clip-top series which is for frameless cabinets. depth adjustment in this image

Only registered members can see post attachments!

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

actionjackson posted:

it looks like blum does have a hinge that allows you to adjust on the third dimension (closer to and further away from the cabinet frame), but it's in their clip-top series which is for frameless cabinets. depth adjustment in this image



Yeah, those are the style I was talking about. The big deal is if they are drop in for the cut out and screw placing of your current hinges. If not, that makes this a much larger project which you should just skip for now.

You're going absolutely nuts bombing every subforum with your new house problems. Most of these won't be visible to you 6 months from now. You need to do a better job triaging what matters and what doesn't. For your own sanity.

actionjackson
Jan 12, 2003





it's not a new house, i've just decided to use the pandemic to pay a lot more attention to things in the home

Goober Peas
Jun 30, 2007

Check out my 'Vette, bro




Motronic posted:

You're going absolutely nuts bombing every subforum with your new house problems. Most of these won't be visible to you 6 months from now. You need to do a better job triaging what matters and what doesn't. For your own sanity.

This is good advice that should not be ignored. Motronic was even nice about it.

You might also consider starting your own thread.

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




actionjackson posted:

it looks like blum does have a hinge that allows you to adjust on the third dimension (closer to and further away from the cabinet frame), but it's in their clip-top series which is for frameless cabinets. depth adjustment in this image



Blum does make a small, face-frame, overlay hinge with all three adjustments. I used them recently and they have a built in soft closer in the hinge but I don't know the model/part number. HDL limited or some other big online Blum distributor should have a catalog where you can find them.

Bi-la kaifa
Feb 4, 2011

Space maggots.



I need to build a gate for my deck to keep the dogs out of the front yard. The deck has aluminum post and railing all around. My predicament is that the previous owner built these deck stairs double wide, and I can't get ahold of any metal gates that could function the way I'd like. Assuming I could just build a pair of wooden gates, could I mount them on the aluminum posts that are just fastened to the deck? It'd look very ugly but I'm looking for function over form here. My instincts say the wood would be too heavy but I'm not an expert.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

Bi-la kaifa posted:

I need to build a gate for my deck to keep the dogs out of the front yard. The deck has aluminum post and railing all around. My predicament is that the previous owner built these deck stairs double wide, and I can't get ahold of any metal gates that could function the way I'd like. Assuming I could just build a pair of wooden gates, could I mount them on the aluminum posts that are just fastened to the deck? It'd look very ugly but I'm looking for function over form here. My instincts say the wood would be too heavy but I'm not an expert.

Yes.









Do you want real answers? Start posting pictures that are meaningful maybe with scale and some idea of what you are trying to do.

NoSpoon
Jul 2, 2004



Why not just pop the screw out of the fixed side, scoot it over a smidge, then pop the screw back in but at the top end of the slot?

PainterofCrap
Oct 17, 2002

Hey bebe





NoSpoon posted:

Why not just pop the screw out of the fixed side, scoot it over a smidge, then pop the screw back in but at the top end of the slot?

The cleat on the stile edge actually wraps around the stile, so it can't be moved in or out in relation to the cabinet face. Up or down, yes.

mutata
Mar 1, 2003

You walk in with the Turnips, you leave with the Bells.



Here's my stupid drywall patching guide from the last thread:


Hi, it's me, a Previous Owner, and this is my Drywall Patching Guide!

I've been inexplicably trying to replace the ceiling fan in my kids' room for MONTHS. This is the kind of task that we POs specialize in, and this is why it has gone wrong in almost every way it could've gone wrong.

I'll skip the part where the cheap fans I was buying kept failing due to defects and skip right to the part where I finally registered that the old fan was installed in a regular ol' ceiling electrical box and probably not a ceiling fan rated box. "Ah!" my DIY PO brain declared, "Easy! I can swap that out no problem!" There was a problem.

The fixture box was likely not fan-rated, but it WAS braced into the joists with cross lumber. Except there was lumber on the side AND above the box, so I couldn't push it into the ceiling to loosen up the big gently caress off nails that were anchoring it. Instead, I had to yank it out downward. Through the ceiling. "You did nothing wrong and you are innocent," said my PO brain. "It was the PREVIOUS OWNER that screwed it up."

Once I got the old box out, I used a drywall saw to clean the hole and trim it square. Only THEN did I start taking pictures because I can't even do that right. Here it is!



You can see the raw power of multiple layers, types, and vintages of wood elements. It's very wood up there. I'm set for wood. The genuinely nice thing here, though, is that I have a lot of wood backing to anchor a chunk of drywall. Still, I'd prefer at least 3 if not the whole outline of the hole for anchoring, so we'll address that later.

But first! Let's slap an actual fan box up there:



So far I'm an expert. I actually don't like this box but I didn't learn that until I was all done so lol. Here's a wider shot so you can see the exact same hole but from farther away:



Good. Next, I need to fill the hole with ramen noodles. Or some spare drywall. Either one will work, probably. First I needed a template, so I employed the builder's grade Crayola marker:







Template made! Will it work? Previous Owners never know, we just saw someone do something like that on HGTV once.



I used a jig saw that I bought from a man in a parking lot but you can use a drywall saw because I will not let you borrow my jig saw or I can give you the parking lot guy's number, it looked like he had some more stuff in his station wagon, just let me know.



Long story short, my template was perfect. It was so perfect that I had to go back outside 3 more times to trim off parts of the drywall that were too big. Perfect! Ok, now for that 3rd anchor edge. For that, I used some scrap wood I had, a 2x4 or a 1x4 or something along those lines. Whatever looked like it was substantial enough to take screws.



You slide that guy up in there with the other wood, adding your own addition to the wood layers in your ceiling so the archaeologists can determine how old your house was by counting the wood rings. Then you use drywall screws to secure the wood hunk into your ceiling:



"But there are big black screws in my ceiling now!" you say. Yes there are. Let's put some more in there now as we install the drywall chunk:



You want to get the piece of drywall nice and secure in the space, and make sure the drywall screw heads are sunk in but not bustin' through. Try to get it as flush with the surrounding drywall as you can, but we're gonna pack it with my daughter's yellow Playdoh later, so that bit doesn't matter as much. As long as it's not inset or proud by some huge amount. Inset is better than proud.



Or at least, that's what I'm going with because MY drywall patch was inset by a bunch on one side and I'm a Previous Owner so I'm right. Next, you use some kind of drywall tape to tape the seams, and some kind of joint compound or drywall plaster to patch over the entire stupid dumb area. The main trick here is you need to tape and mud over MUCH larger of an area than you want to, ruining any kind of texture treatment and paint job. This is the required punishment you signed up for when you thought you could simply change out a fixture. How dare you. Here's my patch taped up with a mesh drywall tape. I think the mesh holds on to the joint compound better or something, who knows.



I used a bucket of All Purpose Joint Compound that's been sitting in my garage in a plastic bag for the past year from the last time I had to fill a ceiling hole. I'm sure it's still good:



Step one of the mudding process, slop a bunch of compound onto your gross dad foot:



Then spread the compound over the patch, seams, and all the way past the tape. Cover everything and fill the cracks. Smooth it out as best you can and pay attention to the outer edges where you need to feather it outward as best you can to thin it out and make the transition as smooth as possible. Basically, you don't want any really obvious terrain changes between old ceiling and new. Wait however long the container says to wait, then wet-sand it with a wet sanding sponge:



Then wipe it clean of dust, and do it again. Repeat the process for 2-3 coats. If you do too many coats, you'll start to build up thickness pretty quickly and you'll have some kind of strange mound shaped architectural feature and your MLS photos will get featured on ugly house blogs, which is the true stamp of excellence for any Previous Owner.



Once you think you have enough crusty poo poo up there (use your uneducated judgement), it's time to re-texturize. I thought I'd be clever and do this texture-in-a-can orange peel poo poo that I also had in my garage for over a year:



But when I tried to test it out by spraying it haphazardly into the air in my front yard, the nozzle failed, the stuff oozed out and then the plastic trigger cap completely broke in my hand. So I watched a YouTube video narrated by a woman who never showed her face who was fixing her own ceiling hole. She used joint compound and a plastic bag with her hand in it to dab peaks in the mud and then lightly knocked them down with a scraper. So I did that instead.

Here's a shot of it before it dried:


The main point here is if you have some kind of applied texture, you gotta match that texture. If you're lucky, maybe you only have paint texture from the roller, in which case, just paint! Oh, that's right; you have to paint the whole loving ceiling or it will never match:



You can see the dried texture there. Since you know what to look for, you can see the edges of the repair, and that's because I did 3 coats of mud and THEN I did the texture on top of that. I probably should've just done 2 base coats and then the texture layer for the final coat and it wouldn't have been quite so raised. You can only see it if you're looking for it, though, and that's the Previous Owner Good Enough Guarantee!

Here's the whole thing after I painted it:





And finally, after 2 failed units (don't worry, I left ENTHUSIASTIC 1-star reviews), here's the finished ~1 hour job that took me several weeks:



I loving hate ceiling fans.

Subjunctive
Sep 12, 2006

careful now



Thank you for this. I have to do some cutting and fishing and patching to get ethernet where I want ethernet to be, and I aspire to be the kind of PO that the new owners have no legal recourse against, but just barely.

FogHelmut
Dec 18, 2003

Your authority is not recognized in Fort Kickass.


I think I broached this topic a few months ago in the old thread, but

I am looking at installing one of those gazebo kits from Costco. I have been redoing my backyard, and am at the stage where I have to pour footers, and therefore have to make a decision on if I'm actually getting it.

The gazebo is made of cedar, not ancient heartwood or anything like that, and its not pressure treated as far as I know. The posts are a true 6"x9" and hollow in the center. They are anchored to the footing with brackets.

See image from footing document:


I plan on pouring the footings so they sit slightly above the paver patio surface. I do not plan on burying the posts below the paver level.

My concern is if the bracket creates enough separation from the concrete to prevent rot. There is not any type of standoff to raise it higher, and I can't find any conventional post bases that would fit the true 6"x9" size. I have seen them for 6x6 rough sawn, but I feel like that would leave the ends hanging off the sides.

I don't predict this will be a particularly wet location, as I live in Southern California, and the gazebo has a solid covered roof, and the posts are 7" in from the roof ends.


Should I be concerned with the product as is?

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Toebone
Jul 1, 2002

Start remembering what you hear.

I cut a hole (roughly 1'x1') in a plaster & lathe wall and need to patch it back up. It's in the back corner of a closet so "good enough" is fine - cut a piece of drywall to size, tape & mud?

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