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Bioshuffle
Feb 10, 2011

No good deed goes unpunished



When I was in high school, I witnessed a lightning strike that took out a tree in my cul-de-sac. The tree collapsed on my neighbor's roof (the neighbors were fine). Since then, I adamantly refuse to shower or do anything that involves water (washing dishes, etc etc etc) if there is a thunderstorm in the area. If I have to do anything that involves going outside in the middle of a thunderstorm (getting in my car for work or walking my dogs for example), I get a huge surge of adrenaline.

Have you ever experienced any kind of adverse weather event? What was it like? Has it led to a profound change on your day to day routine?

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The Walrus Cancer
Sep 14, 2018

If we were all trees, there'd be no more wars. 'Cause we'd be trees.

I almost got washed overboard by a wave during a storm in the North Pacific once. I'm drat lucky my shipmate caught me when he did. This was on a Coast Guard cutter, and we were doing our hourly round of the exterior of the ship. Luckily, we were doubled up on our rounds due to the weather. Made me extra paranoid when going out on the weather decks alone at night during bad weather. But I don't work on ships anymore, so it doesn't affect me anymore.

Do you now install lightning rods on your home?

Coasterphreak
May 29, 2007
I like cookies.

I hate winter weather in general because it makes work miserable. The city I live in is largely suburban hell, and over the years has put together the infrastructure to keep the main thoroughfares clear, but that doesn't help people get out of their neighborhood/multifamily complex and nobody here owns winter tires.

A close second is when we get remnants of tropical systems because wind + heavy rain means there's going to be trees down everywhere, all the traffic lights will be out because lol everything's pole-and-wire here, and hopefully you can see whatever is blocking the road before you slam into it head on!

the_chavi
Mar 2, 2005



Toilet Rascal

I grew up in tornado alley in northeastern Arkansas and as a small child saw a tornado stroll across the street from the store where my grandmother and I took shelter. To this day, the sound of tornado sirens scares me more than anything else.

When I lived in Riyadh, we had fairly frequent dust storms, but one was so big it looked like a 100-meter tall tsunami of brown rolling across the city at high speed. Terrifying but also kind of cool.

JOHN CENA
Oct 20, 2006


during hurricane katrina i lived on the mississippi gulf coast. my mom and her soon-to-be-divorced husband at the time had the bright idea to just evacuate one county north to his mom's place since they figured most hurricane damage was caused by floods only. their house was right along a creek that fed into the MS river. sure enough when katrina struck the house was flooded with about 1 foot of water, a tornado or downburst or just sheer wind, we're not sure what since it was really early in the morning, shifted the house and ripped a portion of the roof off of the structure resulting in it being condemned. that was probably the closest i felt like i was going to die. easily the longest 8 hours of my life.

the road to the house wound up sinking into said creek and we couldnt access civilization for about three days, when we did it took 4 hours to drive what was normally one hour to our house, which was absolutely leveled. had we not evacuated, which shithead was strongly suggesting until relenting to going to his mom's, we all 100% would have died. eventually a makeshift road the the house we were in was built using lots of gravel and tarp (lol) and it was about 3 weeks before we had power again. all we had to eat during this time were MREs and we had to shower with bottled water. that sucked.

A White Guy
Dec 19, 2012

Never fear!
Japan is here!


I did some emergency work in Mammoth in 2017. Basically, in the span of roughly a month, Mammoth was on the receiving end of 50 ft of snow. The only reason I knew a building existed, or how tall they were, was the mound of snow around them was absolutely gargantuan. Where we housed was completely hosed when we showed up, and even finding the generator to get it unchoked with snow involved excavating a path under the snow around the entire building hunting for a gas line. We found it, and then sent a team of dudes to snake up the snow to dig down enough to uncover it.

While we there our first night, another six feet of snow arrived, completely choking out the generator in the middle of the night. That was an easier fix. There were multiple points in the emergency where we dug trails all over peoples yards hunting for propane tanks. Imagine standing on the crown of a tree, and not realizing how far off the ground you are until you spend three hours digging down to find dirt. It was cold, miserable, and tiring.

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Earwicker
Jan 6, 2003



Bioshuffle posted:

When I was in high school, I witnessed a lightning strike that took out a tree in my cul-de-sac. The tree collapsed on my neighbor's roof (the neighbors were fine). Since then, I adamantly refuse to shower or do anything that involves water (washing dishes, etc etc etc) if there is a thunderstorm in the area. If I have to do anything that involves going outside in the middle of a thunderstorm (getting in my car for work or walking my dogs for example), I get a huge surge of adrenaline.

Have you ever experienced any kind of adverse weather event? What was it like? Has it led to a profound change on your day to day routine?

i was once in the shower in a building that was struck by lightning, though the part of the building that was struck was a sort of outlying structure that was connected by an old stone foundation (it was a 13th century castle). i was not electrocutd or anything. though the power did go out and trying to make my way out of a crude half finished bathroom in the dark was a bit of a challenge

i experienced hurricane sandy in new york but the area i was in was not hard hit. there was an entire neighborhood that burned to the ground not that far from me. and a few blizzards that shut down the city for a couple days. those were kind of cool, just seeing all the normally busy streets in manhattan completely empty and filled with snow

i was in the loma prieta quake in the sf bay area in 1989. didn't damage out house beyond destroying a fish tank and some decorative stuff, and we had no power for about a week. i remember our cats acting weird af right before it happened, and also the night before

Earwicker fucked around with this message at 03:32 on Nov 6, 2020

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