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Agrikk
Oct 17, 2003

Take care with that! We have not fully ascertained its function, and the ticking is accelerating.


My uncle is the original owner of a 1973-ish Ford Torino. We used to sit and talk cars at family gathering until he passed away last year, quietly in his sleep.

The car went to my cousin who left it with my aunt who now wants it gone, so my cousin asked me if I wanted it. While I've daydreamed about taking this car and having it rebuilt into a kickass daily driver, I didn't really expect to get it, and now it's here in my lap but I don't know if I should take it.

MY cousin said that the last time she took it out the car barely backed out of the garage and it "barely made it back into the garage". I don't know if it's because it's been sitting undriven for almost two years and it has a couple hundred thousand miles on it, or if the car is seriously a POS. The car is 800 miles away so I can't just pop over and have a mechanic give it a look over. I've asked cousin to give me the VIN so I could look it up, but there's no obligation for me to take on the car.

The thing is, I'm tempted. I know next to nothing about rebuilding a car, other than googling for parts and reading car-building blogs, so I'd have to find a place that would do it for me, but it would be kind of awesome to get the engine rebuilt, fuel-injection, stiffer suspension, new brakes, new interior, replace the three-speed with a five-speed, etc... You know, get a car for free and then spend $30,000 (?) to make it run well.

But is this the car and the time to do it?

I've always had a daydream about buying a Dodge Dart because I've always considered myself a mopar guy and my first car was a Dart, so a Ford would be... different I guess. Plus the whole Starsky & Hutch vibe. It could be fun. Expesive AF but fun.

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bolind
Jun 19, 2005



Pillbug

Are you going to kick yourself in two years if you turn down the offer?

Pomp and Circumcized
Dec 23, 2006

If there's one thing I love more than GruntKilla420, it's the Queen! Also bacon.

Car looks awesome. I don't know your personal situation in terms of finances, driveway space, etc, but I'd take it!

You don't need to drop a huge sum of money into it right away. If the chassis/body is straight and not rotten, then you can look at getting the mechanics sorted (carb rebuilt, new brake parts, general service), and see how you feel about owning/driving it for a while before you commit to a full rebuild.

I'm sure there are plenty of people here on AI who would be happy to give advice on the condition/parts/expense required to get this thing up and running. Are you able to get any photos of the car? Specifically engine bay, wheel arches, door sills, and any other areas which could be prone to rot or are known to have issues on this model. Knowing which state the car is in might help, since older cars last a lot longer in drier states.

Raluek
Nov 3, 2006

WUT.


Agrikk posted:

The thing is, I'm tempted. I know next to nothing about rebuilding a car, other than googling for parts and reading car-building blogs, so I'd have to find a place that would do it for me, but it would be kind of awesome to get the engine rebuilt, fuel-injection, stiffer suspension, new brakes, new interior, replace the three-speed with a five-speed, etc... You know, get a car for free and then spend $30,000 (?) to make it run well.

But is this the car and the time to do it?

are you interested in learning? if you have somewhere to stash the car while you tinker on it, that would be the best of both worlds. you gotta start somewhere.

even if you aren't interested in getting grease under your fingernails, pomp has the right idea; you don't have to trick it out from the get go. it can be a rolling restoration.

bolind posted:

Are you going to kick yourself in two years if you turn down the offer?

this is the big one, though. if you would regret it more than a little bit, isn't it worth the few hundred bucks to go get it, and see what you're getting into?

Agrikk
Oct 17, 2003

Take care with that! We have not fully ascertained its function, and the ticking is accelerating.


These are all good questions to ask myself. Cousin has stated that if I don't take it it will sit in her garage under a tarp so I suppose there is no hurry. And as much as I'd like to take this on myself, I already have too many hobbies that family life is taking me from, so building a car myself, while soooo much fun, isn't in the cards.

But yeah, flying down and taking the car to a mechanic to see what I'm getting into might be worth it.


Let's see:
Basic tuneup

then


Engine rebuild
Aftermarket fuel injection
New brakes
New suspension
New 5-speed transmission
New wheels
New interior
New stereo
...
...

Raluek
Nov 3, 2006

WUT.


Agrikk posted:

These are all good questions to ask myself. Cousin has stated that if I don't take it it will sit in her garage under a tarp so I suppose there is no hurry. And as much as I'd like to take this on myself, I already have too many hobbies that family life is taking me from, so building a car myself, while soooo much fun, isn't in the cards.

But yeah, flying down and taking the car to a mechanic to see what I'm getting into might be worth it.


Let's see:
Basic tuneup

then


Engine rebuild
Aftermarket fuel injection
New brakes
New suspension
New 5-speed transmission
New wheels
New interior
New stereo
...
...



if it's already mostly running and you can just change one thing at a time while you otherwise drive it, that makes it all much more doable

sounds like you arent out much by taking a look, once long distance travel is a thing again

Agrikk
Oct 17, 2003

Take care with that! We have not fully ascertained its function, and the ticking is accelerating.


My cousin sent me the VIN and when I looked it up it's a 1970 Ford Torino with a 302 V8 built in San Jose, CA.

Raluek posted:

if it's already mostly running and you can just change one thing at a time while you otherwise drive it, that makes it all much more doable

sounds like you arent out much by taking a look, once long distance travel is a thing again

As it turns out, my wife knows that I've always wanted to build a car and was planning on giving me one for my 50th birthday next year. When I told her about this she was absolutely all in, and thought that this plan of upgrading one thing at a time over a few years was solid.

I know it at least needs a major tuneup and shocks but yeah, flying down to have a look with a mechanic is the right thing to do. And building this car will be a whole lot more meaningful than picking up some random small block from an auction or barn find.

Raluek
Nov 3, 2006

WUT.


Agrikk posted:

My cousin sent me the VIN and when I looked it up it's a 1970 Ford Torino with a 302 V8 built in San Jose, CA.

Nice, my truck is from the same plant. It's actually in Milpitas, but Milpitas didn't exist back then so it was just sorta near San Jose. It's a mall now, but the cool thing is that they preserved the original building instead of knocking it down, so it still has sort of an industrial look to it.

I like the '70 Torino; it's got sort of an Aus Falcon look to it. Post pics when you go take a look at it!

Steely Dad
Jul 29, 2006





Torinos are cool. How meaningful is the family connection for you? How big is your budget? Assuming you’re committed to taking on a car project, would the cost of shipping this free Torino home vs buying a project Dart leave you with a lot more money to put into the project?

The default answer you’ll get in AI to “should I do this car thing?” is “hell yeah” and that’s certainly my feeling here. That said, if the Torino doesn’t excite you and you’re not planning on doing the work yourself, and your budget is big enough (like the $30k you mentioned), you might have a lot more fun buying someone else’s finished project and driving it.

mobby_6kl
Aug 9, 2009

"You are the best poster... do not let anyone say otherwise."


IMO show up with a new battery and a ratchet set and roadkill it home. You get a free Torino and a guaranteed adventure.

I don't know what exactly you want to do with it, but I think you could have fun with it no matter what the car is or what you can do with it. It could be a rolling probable cause or a shiny museum exhibit. Worst case you could pass it on if you get bored. Is it a pre-smog engine?

Agrikk
Oct 17, 2003

Take care with that! We have not fully ascertained its function, and the ticking is accelerating.


Steely Dad posted:

Torinos are cool. How meaningful is the family connection for you? How big is your budget? Assuming you’re committed to taking on a car project, would the cost of shipping this free Torino home vs buying a project Dart leave you with a lot more money to put into the project?


My uncle bought Nellybelle before I was born and is synonymous with him. Although my project car would be a Dart, I realize that the project car would be just a car while putting money into building Nellybelle could give it new life. It would always be "my uncle's car" (in a good way) if that makes sense. My brother and sister asked if they could drive it, and my cousin was excited that I was excited to put new life into it.

What is really cool about this is that my wife is all-in on this, and I didn't expect her to be. When I said that I'd put a couple of grand into the car maybe twice a year she didn't even blink and building out the car one chunk at a time seems a lot more manageable than making car payments against a $30,000 car that someone else built.

quote:

The default answer you’ll get in AI to “should I do this car thing?” is “hell yeah” and that’s certainly my feeling here. That said, if the Torino doesn’t excite you and you’re not planning on doing the work yourself, and your budget is big enough (like the $30k you mentioned), you might have a lot more fun buying someone else’s finished project and driving it.

I think that's why I came here. I want to do this and I wanted other people to want me to do this.

Steely Dad
Jul 29, 2006





Hell yeah. Do it!

LloydDobler
Oct 15, 2005

You shared it with a dick.



There are a few things missing from this thread to really help us evaluate it:

Pictures of the car
Location of the car, where it was driven its whole life.
Was it garaged or did it sit outside?
Is it all original or modified? Repainted?

If this is a rust belt car that sat outside every night then it's probably a basket case, and you'd have to love it to want to put the energy in to fixing it. If it's a southern car that was garaged then it could be nice, or at worst old, faded and dried out, and won't be too bad to deal with.

If it still starts and runs that's a great starting place, and even if it leaks all the fluids it can be probably made to run decent as is. And if it's all original, I would recommend not customizing it, as it will hold value better as a one-owner survivor in the event you decide to sell it for a dart after a few years.

I did google image search and that is a much cooler Torino body than the later ones I was thinking of. Also it appears there was no 4 door of that generation. So you have a pretty unique american "sports car". Looking forward to the thread when you get it.

casque
Mar 16, 2009


Definitely do it!

Also, has this been posted yet?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QSb_UKSw37Q b

Astonishing Wang
Nov 3, 2004


gently caress

YES

All I would consider is if I had the space, had the time, and had at least a little bit of money to throw at it over time. Get it so that you can tool around in it and worry about the rest of the project later.

Agrikk
Oct 17, 2003

Take care with that! We have not fully ascertained its function, and the ticking is accelerating.


LloydDobler posted:

There are a few things missing from this thread to really help us evaluate it:

Pictures of the car
Location of the car, where it was driven its whole life.
Was it garaged or did it sit outside?
Is it all original or modified? Repainted?

If this is a rust belt car that sat outside every night then it's probably a basket case, and you'd have to love it to want to put the energy in to fixing it. If it's a southern car that was garaged then it could be nice, or at worst old, faded and dried out, and won't be too bad to deal with.

If it still starts and runs that's a great starting place, and even if it leaks all the fluids it can be probably made to run decent as is. And if it's all original, I would recommend not customizing it, as it will hold value better as a one-owner survivor in the event you decide to sell it for a dart after a few years.

I did google image search and that is a much cooler Torino body than the later ones I was thinking of. Also it appears there was no 4 door of that generation. So you have a pretty unique american "sports car". Looking forward to the thread when you get it.

No pictures yet, let me see if I can dig through an old family album to see if any exist. But as a '70 it is reminiscent of the "Red Tomato" from Starsky and Hutch

The car is single-owner 2-door, owned only by my uncle and it has been garaged and driven in the SF Bay Area its entire life, excepting the odd road trip to the mountains or LA or whatever. It is no longer stock as it has an aftermarket crate 302V8 and aftermarket power steering.

It runs and drives, though my cousin said she was "impressed that it made it back into the garage after backing it out into the driveway" but probably because it's been standing idle for a year and a half, rather than any serious mechanical issues. It's got fresh paint as my uncle has had it repainted every ten years or so with a fresh shade of blue. My favorite was the cobalt blue micro flake paint job from the early 80s and the deep shag carpet in the back footwells.

PT6A
Jan 5, 2006

That's why the Wrangler makes me horny the same as a Mustang makes me horny same as a Hilux makes me horny same as a Golf R makes me horny, same as a Lada Niva makes me horny.

See, this sounds awesome and it's my opinion that you must do it.

LloydDobler
Oct 15, 2005

You shared it with a dick.



Agrikk posted:

The car is single-owner 2-door, owned only by my uncle and it has been garaged and driven in the SF Bay Area its entire life, excepting the odd road trip to the mountains or LA or whatever. It is no longer stock as it has an aftermarket crate 302V8 and aftermarket power steering.

Yeah, thats about perfect for what you want as an easy restoration. It should be very rust free.

My 66 Volvo came out of the bay area and is one of the most rust free ones I've ever seen.

KYOON GRIFFEY JR
Apr 12, 2010




you must take this car

Pomp and Circumcized
Dec 23, 2006

If there's one thing I love more than GruntKilla420, it's the Queen! Also bacon.

Great choice on deciding to take the car! We're all looking forward to seeing it, and for the project thread which is certain to follow!

The Royal Nonesuch
Nov 1, 2005



Sounds like a really cool project and you should definitely do it.

Edit: whoops, got my years wrong. You won't even have to smog it if you're in CA!

Agrikk
Oct 17, 2003

Take care with that! We have not fully ascertained its function, and the ticking is accelerating.


Taking ownership of this car brings up a couple of questions:

1. How do you transfer ownership of a car if there isn't a sale? The car will technically be a gift, so how does that work?

2. How will I insure this car? Surely a 1970 car has a bluebook value of right around zero, but if I drop $3000 every six months into it how do I establish value so I can insure it?

meatpimp
May 15, 2004

Psst -- Wanna buy

EVERYWHERE
some high-quality thread's DESTROYED!



Agrikk posted:

Taking ownership of this car brings up a couple of questions:

1. How do you transfer ownership of a car if there isn't a sale? The car will technically be a gift, so how does that work?

2. How will I insure this car? Surely a 1970 car has a bluebook value of right around zero, but if I drop $3000 every six months into it how do I establish value so I can insure it?

1 depends on the state. Typically, it's a transfer of title by signing the back of the current title with the new owner's info, and an application for new title in the new state. In Ohio, you need an "out of state inspection" which amounts to a worker looking at the vin and making sure it matches what's on the title. Then register like any other car.

2 depends on your current insurance and what your needs are. Your current insurance will probably have an option to insure the car for a "declared value" that you and your insurance company agree on. You can also look at specialty insurance like Hagerty that is in the business of insuring cars of particular value.

Raluek
Nov 3, 2006

WUT.


In California, you write the sale amount on the paperwork, and you are taxed some amount based on it. There is an option for a gift, but I think it is only for immediate family members. I think they use bluebook value if your sale number is too low (or zero). You can always make up a number, like $700-1000, that sounds reasonable for an "old junk car" and they won't question it. I have a friend who legitimately bought a car for $1 and was hassled at the DMV over putting that down, though. I don't know how this works for out of state sales.

If it's going to be your daily driver (which it sounds like it isn't, but this is what I'm most familiar with) it's insured based on what the insurance company thinks it's worth, which as you point out, is nowhere near what the car will actually be worth if it's restored or modified.

There are collectors insurance companies, such as Hagerty, which is accustomed to this kind of thing. They won't have a problem with you listing your high dollar modifications and setting a declared value based on them. The downside is that they require that the car is garaged, and that you have another car as your daily driver. I think there are mileage limitations to ensure that you aren't using it as your primary vehicle. I've never done this, but I think others here (IOC's '70 C10, for example) have used Hagerty for their classics before.

KYOON GRIFFEY JR
Apr 12, 2010




Some states have moved to some depreciated value of original MSRP for tax purposes to prevent various shenanigans. The upside is that old cars are very cheap to buy and register.

Liquid Communism
Mar 9, 2004


Out here, everything hurts.




Yeah, my practice has always been that I bought the car for $100 if it's a private sale. The state doesn't ask questions, takes their five bucks in tax, and sends me on my way.

charliemonster42
Sep 14, 2005
VW: Ze Official Kar Ov Ze Sird Reich

Agrikk posted:

No pictures yet, let me see if I can dig through an old family album to see if any exist. But as a '70 it is reminiscent of the "Red Tomato" from Starsky and Hutch

The car is single-owner 2-door, owned only by my uncle and it has been garaged and driven in the SF Bay Area its entire life, excepting the odd road trip to the mountains or LA or whatever. It is no longer stock as it has an aftermarket crate 302V8 and aftermarket power steering.

It runs and drives, though my cousin said she was "impressed that it made it back into the garage after backing it out into the driveway" but probably because it's been standing idle for a year and a half, rather than any serious mechanical issues. It's got fresh paint as my uncle has had it repainted every ten years or so with a fresh shade of blue. My favorite was the cobalt blue micro flake paint job from the early 80s and the deep shag carpet in the back footwells.

Where in the SF Bay Area is it? If it’s near (30 miles ish) to me (Pleasanton) I’d be willing to at least go take a look and take pictures of the important stuff and see what sort of general condition it’s in and any major work that it may or may not need.

This is a seriously cool prospect for you, doubly so with the approval of your better 2/3rds.

LloydDobler
Oct 15, 2005

You shared it with a dick.



I have my old car insured for an agreed upon value, they required my agent to look at the car in person and document the condition with photos so that it at least had the appearance of being valuable in the range I suggested. You can't just take a piece of poo poo rustbucket and insure it for 100k and then wreck it to get a payout. Some insurers will require an appraisal, which is the other official way to get a value for the car. Sometimes it can be done by any automotive dealership, sometimes they require a professional appraiser.

Agrikk
Oct 17, 2003

Take care with that! We have not fully ascertained its function, and the ticking is accelerating.


charliemonster42 posted:

Where in the SF Bay Area is it? If it’s near (30 miles ish) to me (Pleasanton) I’d be willing to at least go take a look and take pictures of the important stuff and see what sort of general condition it’s in and any major work that it may or may not need.

This is a seriously cool prospect for you, doubly so with the approval of your better 2/3rds.

Thanks for the offer but I can just have my aunt send me pictures herself and I can talk to my Uncle's mechanic. Apparently he's been taking the car to the same guy for the last twenty years or so so there should be decent history there.

Itchy_Grundle
Feb 22, 2003



Sound like a great project. Do iiiiiiiiit.

everdave
Nov 14, 2005

For The Record...

A lot of things can be answered if you send 4 corner shots of this showing while car, engine bat, interior, and as many reasonable under car shots as you can.

The guys here can tell you a rough estimate of what shape it’s in and how to proceed.

How many miles are you from car? After pics I can probably fine you my brokers # and if it rolls can get it shipped to you way cheaper than going to get it.

In TN we have a family member form. Otherwise bring pics and put $300 down. I legitimately buy cars for $3-500 and sometimes get hassled on newer stuff I bring pics and show them.

Pics will help a lot. I know you are excited we are excited for you! Just don’t put cart before the horse

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Nidhg00670000
Mar 26, 2010

We're in the pipe, five by five.

Grimey Drawer

everdave posted:

Just don’t put cart before the horse

But it's already RWD?

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