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feedmegin
Jul 30, 2008




Randomcheese3 posted:

The first plan to use tanks in an amphibious landing came in WWI as well, as part of a plan to land on the Belgian coast during the 3rd Battle of Ypres. The plan called for troops to be landed around Ostend from three giant pontoons, pushed by monitors. Each pontoon (plus the two monitors pushing them) could carry an infantry brigade, four artillery pieces and three tanks.

Bloody hell. Giant seems an understatement.

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feedmegin
Jul 30, 2008




Fearless posted:

The tank and the air plane, among a lot of other things, would like a word please.

He did say 'Going into WW1' there...

SeanBeansShako
Nov 20, 2009


Tiger Crazy posted:

So pretty much the same thing that was used when landing troops 200 years earlier. I should have expected not much changed going into WWI much like the rest of the war.

So yeah, this is that strange 'Backwards 1st World War Stuff' misunderstanding that unconsciously rears it's ugly head because of the passage of time and how things change we cannot comprehend that said conflict like all wars bridged technology and tactics that change and develop over time and experince.

xthetenth
Dec 30, 2012

Mario wasn't sure if this Jeb guy was a good influence on Yoshi.



Yeah, as an example, there's been a really significant shift in British thinking after the Boer War, frankly small arms training and practice is very much modern. There are field exercises with individual training and unit training that are very recognizably modern. Soldiers are expected to be in cover and engaging in relatively small groups with aimed fire, and closing in is assumed to require suppression of enemies.

They're set up to fight very effectively and wreak absolute havoc in the battles of 1914, their biggest problem is not really being able to engage without being wrecked in turn. This is very different from even 1899. Even things that look like anachronisms to modern eyes have a real genuine purpose. At Nery, for example, a British holding action against pursuing German cavalry ends with them getting reinforcement, and the British cavalry is very useful in routing the Germans, their horse artillery cripples the German artillery's transport so they have to leave 8 of 12 guns on the field, and a squadron of hussars take 78 prisoners in the pursuit. By 1915, the terrain of the war has been changed to the point that it's absurd, but they're much better adapted to their context than they're generally understood to be.

Acebuckeye13
Nov 2, 2010

There's only one prescription for Nazism and it's 76mm HVAP





Ultra Carp

MikeCrotch posted:

I would rather watch Lindybeige than anything by the History channel

Hey, Dogfights was great.

bewbies
Sep 23, 2003



Fun Shoe

Forged in Fire is awesome

fartknocker
Oct 28, 2012

Damn it, this always happens. I think I'm gonna score, and then I never score. It's not fair.




Wedge Regret

Their Korean War documentary from like 20 years ago that Edward Herrmann narrated was pretty good, although that was still in the era of them doing stuff like that. Tales of the Gun was solid in an era before I could search everything on the internet.

Acebuckeye13 posted:

Hey, Dogfights was great.

FastestGunAlive
Apr 7, 2010

Dancing palm tree.


My favorite history channel show as a kid was clash of warriors, the music was iconic to me

SeanBeansShako
Nov 20, 2009


FastestGunAlive posted:

My favorite history channel show as a kid was clash of warriors, the music was iconic to me

Intolrance?

Also, Epic History has nothing to do with the History Channel as the man behind the thing apparently left in 2013?

FastestGunAlive
Apr 7, 2010

Dancing palm tree.


Yep that’s the song

Randomcheese3
Sep 6, 2011

"It's like no cheese I've ever tasted."

feedmegin posted:

Bloody hell. Giant seems an understatement.

Yeah, they were proper ships in their own right. Here's a picture:



The idea was to be able to put the full assault force ashore in less than 20 minutes, to ensure maximum surprise. This was hard to coordinate with a large force of small boats, but with the pontoons, it was fairly straightforward.

Nothingtoseehere
Nov 11, 2010



xthetenth posted:

Yeah, as an example, there's been a really significant shift in British thinking after the Boer War, frankly small arms training and practice is very much modern. There are field exercises with individual training and unit training that are very recognizably modern. Soldiers are expected to be in cover and engaging in relatively small groups with aimed fire, and closing in is assumed to require suppression of enemies.

They're set up to fight very effectively and wreak absolute havoc in the battles of 1914, their biggest problem is not really being able to engage without being wrecked in turn. This is very different from even 1899. Even things that look like anachronisms to modern eyes have a real genuine purpose. At Nery, for example, a British holding action against pursuing German cavalry ends with them getting reinforcement, and the British cavalry is very useful in routing the Germans, their horse artillery cripples the German artillery's transport so they have to leave 8 of 12 guns on the field, and a squadron of hussars take 78 prisoners in the pursuit. By 1915, the terrain of the war has been changed to the point that it's absurd, but they're much better adapted to their context than they're generally understood to be.

Hot Take: The british army was the most prepared and best out of all the european armies to fight the war of 1914. It's just that the war of 1915 onwards was not that war.

Xakura
Jan 10, 2019




Nothingtoseehere posted:

Hot Take: The british army was the most prepared and best out of all the european armies to fight the war of 1914. It's just that the war of 1915 onwards was not that war.

Also a numbers thing. It's cool that your 250k dudes are really good, everyone else has millions.

Vincent Van Goatse
Nov 8, 2006

Don't be so gloomy. After all it's not that awful. Like the fella says, in Italy for thirty years under the Borgias they had warfare, terror, murder, and bloodshed, but they produced Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, and the Renaissance.


Smellrose

Xakura posted:

Also a numbers thing. It's cool that your 250k dudes are really good, everyone else has millions.

There's an oft-repeated anecdote that a German muckety-muck's (I've seen it attributed to the Kaiser, a prewar Chancellor, or even General von Kluck in the earliest version I've seen) reaction to the BEF was to ask for a squad of Berlin polizei to arrest them.

Vincent Van Goatse fucked around with this message at 18:47 on Apr 24, 2021

SeanBeansShako
Nov 20, 2009


Pre-War British Army, even with the territorials is smol compared to the scarily conscript backed armies of everyone else.

But hey we're good at holding the corners of Belgium up!

The BEF, that thing you wedge under a piece of squeaky furniture.

SlothfulCobra
Mar 27, 2011

STOP BEING EVIL.


MikeCrotch posted:

I would rather watch Lindybeige than anything by the History channel

Wow, you sure like Lindybeige.

Acebuckeye13
Nov 2, 2010

There's only one prescription for Nazism and it's 76mm HVAP





Ultra Carp

more like lindy...bad! #gottem

Gort
Aug 18, 2003


xthetenth posted:

Yeah, as an example, there's been a really significant shift in British thinking after the Boer War, frankly small arms training and practice is very much modern. There are field exercises with individual training and unit training that are very recognizably modern. Soldiers are expected to be in cover and engaging in relatively small groups with aimed fire, and closing in is assumed to require suppression of enemies.

They're set up to fight very effectively and wreak absolute havoc in the battles of 1914, their biggest problem is not really being able to engage without being wrecked in turn. This is very different from even 1899. Even things that look like anachronisms to modern eyes have a real genuine purpose. At Nery, for example, a British holding action against pursuing German cavalry ends with them getting reinforcement, and the British cavalry is very useful in routing the Germans, their horse artillery cripples the German artillery's transport so they have to leave 8 of 12 guns on the field, and a squadron of hussars take 78 prisoners in the pursuit. By 1915, the terrain of the war has been changed to the point that it's absurd, but they're much better adapted to their context than they're generally understood to be.

I vaguely recall reading some stuff saying the British didn't think much of their post-BEF troops and that lead to stuff like the "advance across no-man's land at the walk" commands when BEF troops would have been doing fire-and-manoeuvre tactics that these greener troops were thought incapable of.

There are definitely multiple incarnations of the British army in WW1, and it took a lot of bodies to go from one incarnation to another.

BalloonFish
Jun 30, 2013



Fun Shoe

Gort posted:

I vaguely recall reading some stuff saying the British didn't think much of their post-BEF troops and that lead to stuff like the "advance across no-man's land at the walk" commands when BEF troops would have been doing fire-and-manoeuvre tactics that these greener troops were thought incapable of.

There are definitely multiple incarnations of the British army in WW1, and it took a lot of bodies to go from one incarnation to another.

Yes, I remember something similar. Also that the 'walk across no-man's land' thing wasn't about strolling into machine gun fire, it was a doctrine that rested on the German machine gun posts (and machine gunners) being destroyed by the massive preceding artillery bombardment, so the infantry would just have to walk across, take possession of the German front line and then have cover to resist a counter attack and press the advance. In such a situation, with inexperienced and hastily-trained soldiers and difficult communication the moment a unit left its own trench, it made sense on its own terms. Just the main supposition proved to be false!

Gort
Aug 18, 2003


The other thing I recall was that it wasn't really "we're going to tell the men to walk across no-man's land" it was more like "we're going to give the men thirty kilos of equipment since we want them to arrive well-supplied" which meant that they basically had no option but to walk

spiky butthole
May 5, 2014


Also that if they did the needful and made the walk, their regiment reduced from a few hundred men, stormed the line, won the bunker and repelled counter attack the bosh could shell that position of no mans land for a week straight and slowly clear their section of line bunker by bunker to reclaim it.

Tree Bucket
Apr 1, 2016


Lot of defeatist attitudes ITT. It’s like you don't even want to thrash the hun.

Caustic Soda
Nov 1, 2010


Tree Bucket posted:

Lot of defeatist attitudes ITT. It’s like you don't even want to thrash the hun.

Or maybe they're just not pro-English. "Twas better to die 'neath an Irish sky, than at Suvla or Sedd el Bahr" and whatnot.

Jobbo_Fett
Mar 7, 2014

It would be a sad error in judgement to mistake me for a corpse.


Clapping Larry

6.2 Countermeasures (Ripped from A Radar History of World War 2 by Louis Brown) Part 3/?

American countermeasures began with Luis Alvarez taking the initiative of having one of his staff at Rad Lab, the Canadian Dr. Don Sinclair, work with the General Radio Company in modifying their field-strength measuring set P-540 into radar intercept receiver SCR-587 (Army) and ARC-1 (Navy). Its extraordinarily wide band, from 10 to 300 cm, was to make it useful throughout the war, but it suffered at the time from not having single-knob tuning, so it was not yet ready for the field. It was the second American receiver to prove of value in the new field of electronic intelligence; the Hallicrafter S-27, available in England for sale to amateurs, had picked up the emissions of Seetakt and Freya in early 1941. In an early lesson, Rad Lab had been made receptive to the idea of countermeasures work rather early when the transmission by a nearby amateur had overridden a poorly shielded intermediate-frequency amplifier of one of the experimental radars.

Four days after the attack on Pearl Harbor, American countermeasures began at a meeting among representatives of the National Defense Research Committee, the Rad Lab, and the Navy. They decided without dissent to establish a special laboratory for this purpose and proposed Alvarez as its head because of his intercept-receiver initiative and general interest in the subject. Commitments to work in progress at Rad Lab caused him to decline the offer but with the strong suggestion to offer the job to Professor Frederick Terman, head of the Department of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. This proved a fortuitous choice owing to Terman's knowledge and stature in the field of radio and his ability to approach his many former students in building a staff. In August 1942, he secured an especially valuable addition in the team that was working for Columbia Broadcasting developing color television. Better yet, they brought with them their own laboratory equipment, exactly the type needed and already familiar to them. Terman's general arrangement for obtaining industry people was to have them remain employees of their parent corporation for their services. In addition to the satisfaction of contributing to the war effort, the company thereby gained electronic skills through their engineers that they might easily have missed, had they remained on the sidelines. By January 1944, Terman's lab had 744 employees, 214 of whom were research personnel.

Terman went to Britain in April 1942 for six week and established excellent rapport with Robert Cockburn, who was chief of RAF countermeasures, while he learned the characteristics of German radar and British response. On return, he organized work into three sections; building a jammer for Freya under John Byrne, a jammer for Wurzburg under Bob Sorrell, and continued work on the intercept receiver by Sinclair. By then, his organization had been given the obligatory deceptive name, the Radio Research Laboratory, and had taken up quarters in a wing of the Biological Laboratory at Harvard. Whether for security or to confuse future historians, the jammers for Freya and Wurzburg were given the same names used by TRE, Mandrel and Carpet, but they were different designs.

Early jammers on both sides emitted the radar frequency modulated with a sine wave, but experience showed that it was better to modulate with noise, as this gave the appearance of a deterioration in the performance of the targeted radar receiver rather than some disturbing agency. This was the technique Martini had employed so successfully in the Channel Dash. Gas regulator tubes were common circuit components that form a moderately constant reference voltage when current within some range of values passed through them. Without filter capacitors they showed significant noise levels and took on a new function as noise generators. Another noise generator was the photomultiplier tube. This device was capable of producing an extremely short output pulse on absorbing an optical photo and was the hear of all television cameras. By keeping the multiplier in the dark and increasing the voltage beyond that required for normal operation, thermal electrons from the photocathode and first electrodes produced a shower of pulses at the output and a wonderful, high-amplitude source of high-frequency noise was obtained very simply. Both the Mandrel and Carpet jammers of the Radio Research Laboratory used the RCA 931 photomultiplier for this. Specially designed gas tubes later proved equally good and more convenient, as they needed much lower voltages than photomultipliers.

MikeCrotch
Nov 5, 2011

I AM UNJUSTIFIABLY PROUD OF MY SPAGHETTI BOLOGNESE RECIPE

YES, IT IS AN INCREDIBLY SIMPLE DISH

NO, IT IS NOT NORMAL TO USE A PEPPERAMI INSTEAD OF MINCED MEAT

YES, THERE IS TOO MUCH SALT IN MY RECIPE

NO, I WON'T STOP SHARING IT

more like BOLLOCKnese


Important to remember that as you get later into WWI the thing that really kills attackers is not the initial crossing of no-mans lands, but the shelling and fire from hidden trenches behind the first line that you couldn't originally see.

Battle Tactics of the Western Front covers the debates British high command had about lines Vs other methods of attack, the advantage of lines being it's the most efficient way to get as many people as possible into the fight with the hope you'll overwhelm the enemy. Officers talked about the terrible decisions you have to make in such an attack - once you send a wave over it's almost impossible to tell what has happened to them; if they were all immediately killed sending another wave just gets men killed, if the first wave got to the enemy sending in another wave might be the difference between those dudes living and dying and the attack succeeding.

Ensign Expendable
Nov 11, 2008

Lager beer is proof that god loves us


Pillbug

Pz.Kpfw.IV Ausf.J-H

Queue: IS-6, SU-101/SU-102/Uralmash-1, Centurion Mk.I, SU-100 front line impressions, IS-2 front line impressions, Myths of Soviet tank building: early Great Patriotic War, Influence of the T-34 on German tank building, Medium Tank T25, Heavy Tank T26/T26E1/T26E3, Career of Harry Knox, GMC M36, Geschützwagen Tiger für 17cm K72 (Sf), Early Early Soviet tank development (MS-1, AN Teplokhod), Career of Semyon Aleksandrovich Ginzburg, AT-1, Object 140, SU-76 frontline impressions, Creation of the IS-3, IS-6, SU-5, Myths of Soviet tank building: 1943-44, IS-2 post-war modifications, Myths of Soviet tank building: end of the Great Patriotic War, Medium Tank T6, RPG-1, Lahti L-39, American tank building plans post-war, German tanks for 1946, HMC M7 Priest, GMC M12, GMC M40/M43, ISU-152, AMR 35 ZT, Soviet post-war tank building plans, T-100Y and SU-14-1, Object 430, Pz.Kpfw.35(t), T-60 tanks in combat, SU-76M modernizations, Panhard 178, 15 cm sFH 13/1 (Sf), 43M Zrínyi, Medium Tank M46, Modernization of the M48 to the M60 standard, German tank building trends at the end of WW2, Pz.Kpfw.III/IV, E-50 and E-75 development, Pre-war and early war British tank building, BT-7M/A-8 trials, Jagdtiger suspension, Light Tank T37, Light Tank T41, T-26-6 (SU-26), Voroshilovets tractor trials.


Available for request (others' articles):


Shashmurin's career
T-55 underwater driving equipment
T-64's composite armour


Oerlikon and Solothurn anti-tank rifles
Evolution of German tank observation devices

Cessna
Feb 20, 2013

KHABAHBLOOOM

Unreal_One posted:

Eh, a copy is overstating the influence. There's a clear through line of swamp boat to LCPL to LCPR, with only the last one taking the ramp from the Daihatsu. It'd be like calling the Bf-109 a copy of the Dewoitine D.500 because they took the concept of moteur-canon.

I'll stand by "copy." From WIkipedia:

quote:

The Japanese had been using ramp-bowed landing boats like Daihatsu-class landing craft in the Second Sino-Japanese War since the summer of 1937—boats that had come under intense scrutiny by Navy and Marine Corps observers at the Battle of Shanghai in particular, including from future general, Victor H. Krulak.[6] When Krulak showed Higgins a picture and suggested that Higgins develop a version of the ramped craft for the Navy, Higgins, at his own expense, started his designers working on adapting the idea to the boat design.

This is backed up in more detail in the book Storm Landings by Alexander, I can dig that up if you like.

Cessna
Feb 20, 2013

KHABAHBLOOOM

Randomcheese3 posted:

Yeah, they were proper ships in their own right. Here's a picture:



The idea was to be able to put the full assault force ashore in less than 20 minutes, to ensure maximum surprise. This was hard to coordinate with a large force of small boats, but with the pontoons, it was fairly straightforward.

Operation "All The Eggs In One Basket" going as planned, I see.

Alchenar
Apr 9, 2008



So I guess when the shore bombardment starts everyone on the pontoon's eardrums burst?

Jobbo_Fett
Mar 7, 2014

It would be a sad error in judgement to mistake me for a corpse.


Clapping Larry

6.2 Countermeasures (Ripped from A Radar History of World War 2 by Louis Brown) Part 4/?

The Radio Research Laboratory produced on of the most curious jamming devices of the war, Tuba. The Lab's American contingent at TRE noticed a prototype ground jammer called Ground Grocer that worked on 50 cm, designed to get as much power as possible out of the Micropup triodes and intended to interfere with the new Lichtenstein radar of the night fighters. Beams were directed from the coast of England at regions where they would encounter the night fighters pursuing returning bombers. The Americans recalled the very-high-frequency beam tetrode called the resnatron, invented by Sloan and Marshall, that had almost entered the open scientific literature. It could generate decimeter waves of very high power with a modest range of adjustable wavelength. Radio Research Lab proposed a jammer based on it, and the British ordered one immediately. The tubes that formed the heart of Tuba were demountable and vacuum pumped; on-site repairs and maintenance were possible from a truck-mounted machine shop. The power was radiated through waveguide-fed horns of the large size that 50 cm required, and its 80 kW of continuous power could light a fluorescent tube a mile away. A canvas cover once burst into flame when placed over the exit horn. Initial deployment proved troublesome to German fighters near the Channel that headed into Tuba's radiation, but not to those further away, regardless of their direction. All effort was soon pointless when airborne radar wavelength changed to 3.5 meters just as Tuba became operational, a wavelength completely outside its capabilities.

At times, nature provided radar operators with disturbances far more intense than did the enemy. This was particularly true of long-wave equipment. Engineers and Air Force officers often saw alarming signals on the oscilloscopes of CH that the seasoned women operators summarily dismissed as "ionospherics" or some such, yet saw them fasten onto an imperceptible blip for which a squadron scrambled to intercept. On the other side, the versatile Telefunken engineer Wilhelm Stepp commented that "Initiating new equipment, and the long-wave set "Heidelberg" comes to mind, was like an expedition into a wonder world of new and, at the time, unknown phenomena and difficulties". Out of these anomalies emerged some new science. J S Hey located the ions in the upper atmosphere that marked the path of an incoming meteor and discovered the greatly enhanced radio energy of solar flares using GL equipment; he at first thought the solar radiation was very clever jamming by the Germans. Radio propagation peculiarities near the ocean surface often produced unaccountable and unexpectedly long ranges to targets that confused the operators and sometimes generated phantom targets - fired on by batteries from both sides of the Channel. Clouds and humidity gradients added to the confusion, and sidereal noise limited the signal-to-noise ratio obtainable with CH.

When Watt and Wilkins made their calculations in 1935 of the intensity of the re-radiation by a dipole, intended to approximate the resonance behavior of the wing structure of an airplane, they inadvertently investigated a very effective means for interfering with radar. A modern radar operator is by no means exempt from the confusion that this early countermeasure produces when a shy target fills the space surrounding itself with dipoles cut to lengths that resonate at the wavelength of the incident radiation. There are ways for him to deal with this nuisance but a nuisance it remains, one that can saturate his equipment. When one considers how obvious the idea is and how many persons thought of it independently, how puzzling seems the extreme secrecy placed on it before its first use in 1943.

Lindemann, ever ready to find fault with early radar, had seized on the effect of releasing dipoles in the CH beam that his student, R V Jones, who was studying infrared detection, had pointed out to him. One of the virtues of CH, however, was its resistance to this form of interference. The long wavelength and horizontal polarization required that the dipoles had to be some meters long and suspended horizontally, which never proved feasible. Knowledge of the efficacy of dipoles spread when the Bawdsey researchers used dipoles suspended by balloons in testing the 5 m GL sets. American operators of SCR-268 learned early to have someone climb a tower with an attached dipole in order to test their equipment.

Thinking about these things was not restricted to the learned and was especially encouraged among those most closely trapped by events. Thus when 148 Squadron was making electronic intelligence flights in North Africa in September 1941 and found themselves subjected to intense AA fire, they suspected that their antennas were enhancing their radar echo. In a subsequent raid on Benghazi , they had the bomber crews throw out 46 cm long aluminum strips, the dimension being that of the antenna suspected of having drawn fire, but found no effect on the accuracy of the Flak. Obvious speculation about what might have resulted had the crews been informed about the Wurzburg wavelengths and cut the strips to 27 cm must be tempered by the knowledge that there were no Wurzburgs in North Africa until April 1942, indeed no German radar at all until January of that year.

In March 1942, Joan Curran, the only woman scientist at TRE, reported her own investigation of the idea, which she found practical and compelling. By 4 April, its use had Air Ministry approval and the code name of Window. Fighter Command requested that its use be held back until its effect against British radar had been established. These tests did, in fact, show that the AI Marks VII and VIII, the first 10 cm sets, were affected. Their beams spiraled around the direction of the fighter, and Window confused the radial indicator display; the tests also showed the GCI sets then being introduced, which used 50 cm radiation, could also be seriously confused, greatly complicating night interception. Bomber Command was beginning to find the losses attributed to Wurzburg-directed Flak unacceptable, which led to a dispute between the two commands, and Window introduction was postponed when it was learned that AI Mark X or SCR-720, which had a different kind of indicator, was much less susceptible. Neither command was aware at the time that the German airborne interception radar was being designed for the Wurzburg wavelength. Cockburn was permitted to experiment but under the strictest security.

Hannibal Rex
Feb 13, 2010


Comstar posted:

Youtube is now far surpassing made for TV documentaries.

It's already been a while since you made that post, and I have to fully agree. However, that is not because I think random youtubers produce quality content. It's because there's a ton of absolutely stellar lectures and discussions by professional historians freely available on Youtube. If you know who the leading names in whichever field or time period that interests you are, Youtube is a great way to get content that's far, far more in-depth than anything you will get even from the best made TV documentaries. You can get unadulterated Glantz, Browning, Tooze, Kotkin, etc., all just a search away.

Trin Tragula posted:

The problem here is, by the time Brest-Litovsk is being negotiated, you've got on the one hand Woodrow Wilson let out of his box and banging on about the Fourteen Points and self-determination; and on the other you have Georges Clemenceau, about whom it is deeply unfair to say he was the French Churchill, because if you're going to put it like that you should say Churchill is the English Clemenceau. Neither of them are even remotely interested in buying gay black Hindenburg and Ludendorff's KK-Brot and nail statues.

Even if you want to handwave some sensible Germans into power, you also have to handwave in a Joseph Caillaux premiership in France after the failure of the Nivelle offensive. Then, and only then, might you actually get somewhere with peace talks.

Case in point: A while ago, I wondered about the relation of the treaties of Brest-Litovsk and Versailles. Just now, I had my mind completely blown by a lecture by Adam Tooze that completely puts a new light on Brest-Litovsk for me. Maybe it won't be quite as revelatory for the rest of you, but I still very much want to share it, because it's absolutely fantastic.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EDlRKl3XGoM

And yesterday, I watched a tremendously entertaining Q&A session between Slavoj Zizek and Stephen Kotkin about the first part of his Stalin trilogy:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lm7mb9eHg24

Uncle Enzo
Apr 28, 2008

I always wanted to be a Wizard

Hannibal Rex posted:



And yesterday, I watched a tremendously entertaining Q&A session between Slavoj Zizek and Stephen Kotkin about the first part of his Stalin trilogy:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lm7mb9eHg24

Stalin: A Magnificent Journey
Stalin 2: Electric Gulag-oo
Stalin 3: Return Of Hitler

Hannibal Rex
Feb 13, 2010


Uncle Enzo posted:

Stalin: A Magnificent Journey
Stalin 2: Electric Gulag-oo
Stalin 3: Return Of Hitler

The Fellow Traveller of Lenin
The Two Powers
The Return of the Chairman

Warden
Jan 16, 2020


Hannibal Rex posted:


Case in point: A while ago, I wondered about the relation of the treaties of Brest-Litovsk and Versailles. Just now, I had my mind completely blown by a lecture by Adam Tooze that completely puts a new light on Brest-Litovsk for me. Maybe it won't be quite as revelatory for the rest of you, but I still very much want to share it, because it's absolutely fantastic.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EDlRKl3XGoM


I'm guessing that lecture is related to Tooze's The Deluge: The Great War and the Remaking of Global Order, published in 2014. It's a really good book, but dense as hell.

I particularly like the part where he opines that in regards to Versailles Treaty John Maynard Keynes should have shut the gently caress up, followed by him shutting the gently caress up some more, and not going to Germany for a book tour, where he was welcomed by adoring crowds.

MikeCrotch
Nov 5, 2011

I AM UNJUSTIFIABLY PROUD OF MY SPAGHETTI BOLOGNESE RECIPE

YES, IT IS AN INCREDIBLY SIMPLE DISH

NO, IT IS NOT NORMAL TO USE A PEPPERAMI INSTEAD OF MINCED MEAT

YES, THERE IS TOO MUCH SALT IN MY RECIPE

NO, I WON'T STOP SHARING IT

more like BOLLOCKnese


It's part of a three part lecture on Germany in the interwar period, one of them is an oddly compelling story about farming and I can't remember what the other one is.

Libluini
May 18, 2012

Did I predict the future?


Grimey Drawer

Cessna posted:

Operation "All The Eggs In One Basket" going as planned, I see.

Yeah, my first reaction to that was "But what if a German U-Boat manages to torpedo it when it's loaded up real good with all the troops?"

Trin Tragula
Apr 22, 2005



Can't make an invasion without blooding the pups...

aphid_licker
Jan 7, 2009

eyebrowse


Pillbug

MikeCrotch posted:

It's part of a three part lecture on Germany in the interwar period, one of them is an oddly compelling story about farming and I can't remember what the other one is.

He says what is in each lecture at 5:03. Diplomatic, economic, social, Ukraine/Crimea, economic historiography, agrarian cooperative in Württemberg.

Fangz
Jul 5, 2007

Oh I see! This must be the Bad Opinion Zone!


Libluini posted:

Yeah, my first reaction to that was "But what if a German U-Boat manages to torpedo it when it's loaded up real good with all the troops?"

Well, by WW2 they were using cruise ships as troop ships. That pontoon doesn't compare to RMS Queen Mary carrying over 15,000 passengers...

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knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011

Running no point.

Jobbo_Fett posted:

6.2 Countermeasures (Ripped from A Radar History of World War 2 by Louis Brown) Part 4/?

Just want to say I'm enjoy the radar posts! And also the VT info before that.

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