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Earwicker
Jan 6, 2003



Schweinhund posted:

You don't need winter tires in PA. If you can afford them and want to go through the hassle of changing them twice per year then go for it but most people don't use them.

I'm in new jersey and it doesn't snow that much around here. There might be 3 significant snowfalls per winter and they plow it off the roads within a day. So you might not even have to drive in snow any time soon.

really depends on where in PA. i used to live in Pittsburgh and we got way more snow than that, and the city was terrible at dealing with it in many neighborhoods, plus it's a hilly town so icy/snowy roads are extra hosed. up in Erie and that area they get lake effect snow.

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Earwicker
Jan 6, 2003



Eric the Mauve posted:

I also grew up in Pennsyltucky and now live in the Philly area and the difference is definitely stark to me. So yeah probably living way further north skewed your perspective a bit

It depends on how long you've lived at each place too, because especially in southeast PA that 27" per-year average is comprised of some years of basically 0 and some years of 50+.

Climate and topography's effect on it is really fascinating (e.g. Monaco is closer to the North Pole than Buffalo, and so forth).

having lived in both pittsburgh and nyc (which has p much the same weather as philly) there's also the fact pittsburgh is quite hilly compared to the flat coastal cities so ice on the road becomes even more of a problem and also the city was just really bad at plowing/salting/etc when i lived there which is more of a government/funding/infrastructure issue than weather per se but it was definitely a noticeable difference. that was decades ago though

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