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Panzeh
Nov 27, 2006

This is why we have orders, general.

Someday i'm gonna post about how Imperialism II is the best 4x game ever made but then i really need to play it and it's a massive pain to get windowed.

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Electromax
May 6, 2007


I've beaten the 2002 REmake of Resident Evil more than any other game. It was the reason I bought a GameCube because I was astonished how good it looked in magazines and on TV ads:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Af7QJU2g14I

They updated the original game, keeping the appeal of the core design - a labyrinthine mansion with several themed keys you must find while dodging zombies amid meager supplies - and updated it with a much heavier, older vibe. Everything is darker, faintly lit or flickering with candles, extreme claustrophobic camera angles and zombies intentionally placed in blind spots so you can hear them long before you can see them. The game doesn't offer you much help, only doing general signposting at a few points and letting your map do the work. There are two characters to choose from who differ by loadout (Jill can carry more and has a lock-pick but must find lighter, Chris is faster and has a lighter but must find old keys) and there are branching paths with multiple endings based on whether you are able to save your allies (and get the optional endboss).



It has that beautiful design where your first slow, uncertain walkthrough can take 10-20 hours depending on how lost you become, but as you become familiar the game can be run through comfortably in 3-4 hours. To me, there's a lot of fun in thinking ahead - "first I am going here then here, need to keep enough pocket space for this and this, and then take it all here through this room so I can avoid that room with the two zombies." It's really satisfying to execute the plan and get from one side of the mansion to the other unscathed. There's a "real survivor" unlockable difficulty where your item storage doesn't connect between rooms so you have to strategize even more about what to bring where. Then there's invisible enemy mode where you can't see anyone! Rewards for beating the game with just the knife. Without saving. Without item storage. All these mini-challenges can feel quite different because they force different playstyles.

The "Crimson Head" V-ACT enemy was a great new addition. The idea is that when you kill a zombie, if you don't dispose of the body by burning it (with limited kerosene) or decapitation (with luck) it will reanimate after 10-20 real-life minutes as a crimson head super fast 28 days later style swiping psycho zombie, meaning that killing enemies early on actually makes those areas HARDER during return trips, not easier. These things are freaky no matter when you encounter them.



It also added a new portion out in the woods behind the mansion and introduced a new monster, Lisa, an unfortunate woman who was basically tortured as a girl and transformed into a big immortal creature who wears her mom's face as a mask. They added some typically memorable RE notes to explain this. Lisa only appears in ~2 rooms where you have to escape or maneuver around her before her boss battle, but in a theoretical remake in the RE engine ala 2 and 3 I could see her being similar to Mr. X, Jack Baker, etc.

There was also a "one dangerous zombie" mode where one of your zombified allies, Forest, would appear in various rooms and run at you attacking, but you couldn't kill him without detonating his grenades. Doesn't really count because it required beating the game several times to unlock, but they were already playing with interesting enemy setups. Aside from some scripted events, zombies can't really use doors or move between rooms so you can use that "position reset" to cheese certain things.

RE0 wasn't well received and RE4+ are history, so this is the last (current) great hurrah of fixed-background tank control horror that some of us enjoyed as far back as Alone in the Dark in the early 90s. I made 3 images while getting the platinum on PS4 recently that are intended to help anyone beat the game, because I think it has an intimidating reputation but it deserves to be experienced.
https://twitter.com/hatersgonnahate/status/1409615780250066945?s=20

Shine
Feb 26, 2007

No Muscles For The Majority


Electromax posted:

Jill can carry more and has a lock-pick

Seems like that might be handy.

Erwin the German
May 30, 2011

:3


Prey (2017)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0woIMIYWkPk

Did somebody say rambling, long effort post about a video game? I sure did!

Remember when I said Iíd talk about another game Ďsoon?í (liar, but thank you anyway) Yeah, oops. But here it is! Itís Prey from 2017, which is a simply impeccable game. In the way Nier Automata makes me feel good in emotional and Ďreally good storyí vibing ways (which automatically places it higher in my calculus), Prey tickles my brain in terms of sheer atmosphere and gameplay. It has an interesting narrative too, but it just doesnít resonate on an emotional and deep level like Automata did. But thatís fine - Prey isnít about that, really, not at its core. Itís about putting you in the game world, which is a fully realized and lived-in space (if thoroughly hosed up), giving you objectives to accomplish, and letting you have at it. Itís easily one of the better immersive sims Iíve ever played, and arguably Arkane Studioís best take on the genre. Dishonored 1 and 2 are both excellent as well, but not quite as easy for me to pick up and play - Prey feels exceptionally approachable to me, the options it gives you in how to get through it are varied and typically very fun to play out. Itís a game where the whole is much more than the sum of its parts, but especially stands out in just how rewarding it is to play.

I'm gonna be leaving stuff out of this - possibly important stuff. Story stuff, certain weapons and powers you get, that sort of thing. It's way more rewarding and cool to find these things in game and experiment rather than me revealing them all. Rather, this is gonna mostly go over how it 'feels' to play, and certain progression systems.

So I talked about immersive sims a bit when I wrote about Deus Ex, my favorite game - Prey is similar to Deus Ex in a lot of respects, but also to other games which are arguably the more Ďtraditionalí titles that Prey is a spiritual successor to. These primarily include the ĎShock games, from Bioshock to System Shock 2 - System Shock 2 is the most dead ringer here, both games involving being alone in a space setting where everything has gone to hell owing to monsters and deadly robots. Both games also suffuse technology with psychic powers being the stand-in for fantasy magic. Deus Ex, however, is my primary reference point for this genre, and the game Iíve played the most of alongside Prey, so thatís where most of the comparisons are gonna be drawn from.

Both games put you in a level and ask that you traverse it to reach your objective. They both present a variety of situations; an enemy you lack the ammo to comfortably defeat conventionally. A locked room to get into - the window affords a view of a shiny new toy or cache of supplies. A computer you donít know the password to that might contain useful information, lore, or security access. Both games encourage stealth, for a wide variety of purposes - avoiding an unnecessary, resource wasteful fight, getting the drop on a difficult enemy and neutralizing them before they become a credible threat, or overhearing things you wouldnít have heard if you ran in guns blazing (Deus Ex has much more of that, but Prey has a few instance too). Immersive sims donít want you to play Ďfair,í they want you to play dirty and use every trick up your sleeve. They reward smart play, and maximizing the advantages your tools and build afford you. This is a good idea in any game, but especially so in Ďsims where your resources are almost always limited in some way. Both games present you with challenges and ask 'how do you solve this with the tools and skills at your disposal?'

You can probably tell that I like Prey for a lot of the same reasons I love playing Deus Ex, gameplay wise, but Prey is far from a carbon copy. Deus Ex has skills and augs, Prey has Ďneuromods.í Both have a large variety of weapons (which Deus Ex allows you to mod with silencers and scopes and such - Preyís are weapon upgrade kits that raise weapon stats) and tools as well, but I wanna focus on neuromods first. Theyíre very similar to Deus Exís augmentations and skills both, being the primary avenue through which you upgrade your Morgan Yu, naturally by stabbing a syringe into your eye in a wonderful bit of understated body horror. Neuromods can either accentuate your natural Ďhumaní abilities, such as being able to carry more, hack things better, do more damage with weapons, lifting and repairing broken things, the list goes on. The other side of this progression system are the Typhon abilities, those being the aliens that have infested Talos I (the eighth wonder of the world, in space!). These powers are the System Shock 2 psychic abilities, more or less - turn into a coffee mug to avoid detection. Perform literal brain blasts, lots of those. Assume mental control over robots and other foes. Do the Mass Effect lift thing and shoot hapless enemies as they float around.



Itíd be one thing if you could just unlock all those cool powers, but the game makes you jump through an appropriate amount of hoops before getting them all. Critically, while you can usually just mainline your human powers, you can only upgrade alien abilities after scanning relevant targets (those aliens that will tend to have those abilities natively) with a helmet you get early on. This is a neat little melding of stealth gameplay considerations being linked to other progression avenues. Most of these powers, the active ones, also consume psi energy, which you can also upgrade. More on this soon.

Itís notable that for this game, you can complete the entire thing while never taking an ability in alien powers. This is how I played the first time through, even. You can, in fact, also play through the whole thing while never touching your human side, going 100% sicko mode. This is how I played through the second time - thereís an achievement for playing through twice while being exclusive to either side, as an added bonus.

How you choose to spend your neuromods, either going exclusive or spreading them out all around, will inescapably dictate how you play. Remember psi energy? Thereís a side quest about mid-way through that lets you spike the stationís water supply with brain juice - just take a sip from a water fountain and youíll restore psi energy, which until that point was only restored through psi hypos and other items. Assuming youíre relying a lot on alien powers, as I was in my second run, this will effectively turn you into a psychic wizard powered almost entirely by bathroom sinks, darting out to launch brain energy at aliens before ducking back in for another sip.

Importantly, how you spend your mods will also dictate what people say about you, or how robots perceive you throughout the game. Those floating turrets donít like things with too much alien matter inside of them, and that includes you.

Naturally thereís also a lot of weapons and other stuff, as I mentioned before, and ammo is usually gonna be a problem - or it would be, if there werenít another element to the game in the form of collecting raw materials to use inside of matter replicating machines. Found an extra gun? Slap it in the material recycler. Same goes for alien organs, other organic matter, and basically anything you can think of. Take the raw materials and put them into the fabricator. Make a new gun, make neuromods, make ammo, make health kits and psi hypos. If you lack a recycler in easy reach, donít worry, the game has your back. Its primary grenades are portable recycler charges that, when thrown, suck in anything in the blast radius and reduce them to their raw parts. Anything you can potentially move is usually subject to this - turn a barricade of heavy objects into instant mineral parts. Stack up alien bodies (or human) nearby so you get some organic mats too. Efficiency is always nice.

As much as this sounds as if the game has potentially limitless resources, this isnít the case, though this depends a lot on your chosen difficulty settings. Itís very possible to have access to all of these systems and tools, manufacturing your specified stuff, but those mats arenít limitless. Your inventory is limited. Your recyclers are limited. Bodies and Ďstuffí is limited. You may not even have the blueprints to make what you want yet, so do you spend those materials now, or wait? Choose what you make wisely. This becomes even more pronounced in the gameís survival mode, which adds fun bodily conditions to deal with among other things that make the game more of a resource management ordeal.

So how do you maximize your resources, besides grubbing up stuff and stuffing them into a big machine? By playing smart. Choose your fights, maximize your advantages. Run away when you need to. Know when you spend resources to end a fight quicker. Play to your strengths, the ones you build up through found neuromods. All of the gameís systems smoothly and wonderfully play into one another, and thatís what peak immersive sim performance looks like. These gameplay elements are why I think itís a truly great example of the genre.



Gameís not all about how it plays, though, itís got a lot of other stuff going on. A mystery to solve, an amnesiac protagonist piecing together the disaster and being fed information in drips. Lots and lots of audio logs from mostly dead crew, who are well acted and portrayed alive or in audio form until you stumble across their corpses. The character art style has that great Arkane aesthetic, where people look faintly stylized, like theyíre coming out of a gritty comic book. It has a wonderful soundtrack, though criminally short, made by Mick Gordon, the same guy who did Doom 2016ís soundtrack. This one is generally less pulse pounding and has a lot more contemplative and atmospheric tracks.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fDTS7PdJopQ

Speaking of aesthetics, though, the gameís setting is a well-realized take on the retrofuture, suffusing a variety of older architectural styles from 60s art-deco to Soviet brutalism. The game takes place in an alternate history, and it shows even in this timelineís future.



Thereís not an abundance of creatures in the game, but thereís enough to feel satisfying enough, especially taking into account more souped up versions of the same aliens. Mimics are the gameís stand out design, being headcrab-esque looking fuckers that can turn into normal objects they get into contact with. Phantoms are the more compelling monsters to me, though, being created from dead humans by another alien entirely - when they stalk around in search of you, theyíll continue speaking in disjointed mutterings, sometimes showing a reflection of who they used to be before an alien monster turned into something else. Theyíre also dangerous as hell. All of the alien enemies share a great, gross-looking oil slick design, constantly shimmering and looking out of place, dissolving into piles of black goo when killed. Very cool, at least to me, though Iíve heard people complain at the sameyness. It works for me.

As far as Your Choices Mattering, thereís a variety of endings you can get, sure, but donít go into this expecting a revolutionary game in terms of how it reacts to certain things. People will live or die depending on what you do, and that does matter, of course. Play psychotic games, win psychotic prizes. The game respects your intelligence enough to react accordingly to how you play it, and that includes how you treat other survivors.



And thatís all the main campaign. They released a great rogue-like DLC called Mooncrash, which is its own bag of gameplay worms. This one takes place on the moon, but still overrun with typhon and murderous robots, obviously. Mooncrash plays a lot like the main game, but is different in key and drastic ways. Itís a series of simulations ran, during which you take up the role of one of several survivors, all with different abilities, starting gear and play styles. Get them off the moon. Die, and restart the whole process from the word go. Each Ďsimulationí, a series of 5 runs or whenever you restart the simulation, is self-contained and always semi-randomly generated. Get out with one character and that escape is blocked for the next one. Grab too much gear from a stash and the next character will lack those tools. This creates a great, fun dynamic where youíre constantly having to plan ahead and consider your options for the next characterís escape. No save scumming, either. Oh, and the simulation is constantly degrading, adding more enemies, environmental hazards, and other fun stuff to deal with as your 5-character run progresses.

With everything else Iíve mentioned about the main game, fusing those elements into a fully realized rogue-like side-DLC is a home run choice. Thereís even a neat side plot to uncover in Mooncrash, particularly involving the characters you play and what really happened. More mysteries.

So, thatís a lot of words. To sum it up, though, I love Prey because it respects your time, respects playing it smart. Play in a measured and canny way, and youíre in for a great time. Thatís the essence of being a good immersive sim, and the atmosphere and tone of the game, the setting, the music, all of that is just icing on the cake. Maybe a little strange I put Automata above this, now that I think about it, but what can I say, I really like existential androids too.

Arkane Studios has basically made it their Ďthingí to make these sorts of games, from Dishonored, to Arx Fatalis, to Dark Messiah, so if any of this sounded interesting to you, definitely check out their line-up. System Shock 2, Deus Ex, some of the Bioshock games (the earlier ones, but I donít care much for the franchise in general) are also all great immersive sim candidates. Thanks for reading, or skimming, and play Prey.

Which should have been called Psychoshock or something, honestly. Very dumb.

Erwin the German fucked around with this message at 15:11 on Jul 2, 2021

Dominoes
Sep 20, 2007



Agree - Prey is one of my top 2 favorite single player games, along with The Witness.

Zaphod42
Sep 13, 2012

If there's anything more important than my ego around, I want it caught and shot now.


Prey is a game I wish I had played much sooner. Goddamn the marketing team hosed them, the name really screwed that game. Call it SpaceShock and it would have sold 10x more copies.

Electromax posted:

I've beaten the 2002 REmake of Resident Evil more than any other game. It was the reason I bought a GameCube because I was astonished how good it looked in magazines and on TV ads:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Af7QJU2g14I

How does the more recent PC REMake compare to the GC version?

Zaphod42
Sep 13, 2012

If there's anything more important than my ego around, I want it caught and shot now.


If you have an hour, the Joseph Anderson breakdown of Prey is REALLY REALLY good.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KS0NtNxlX-s

Spoilers, if you haven't played Prey, you REALLY should try it before watching the above video or reading too much about it.

Also, FWIW, Erwin the German's writeup stuck to mostly gameplay and avoided a lot of the story concepts, which IMO are the best part of Prey. The mere concept behind the central conceit of the game is so cool and thought-provoking, but I'm not mad because reading about it will spoil everything, and if you don't already know about the implications of neuromods, you really need to play the game yourself.

Zaphod42 fucked around with this message at 22:21 on Jun 29, 2021

Erwin the German
May 30, 2011

:3


Yeah no, I didn't really wanna touch the story and conceit too much, it's way better discovered as you play. Prey has a really good story and inherent mystery to it, which you should discover for yourselves, while enjoying great gameplay.

BiggerBoat
Sep 26, 2007

For That you Get the Head...

The Tail...

The Whole Damned Thing

Electromax posted:

I've beaten the 2002 REmake of Resident Evil more than any other game.

My effort post was on the original but I'm sure the remake is superior. I gave it a run a few years back but my muscle memory was shot with everything having to do with tank controls and I pussed out on it. Also, those maps you made are cool as hell.

Erwin the German
May 30, 2011

:3


It's a really hot day and it turns out I effort post best when it's disgusting out.

Hunt: Showdown (2018)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j_jKlnqoQ90

My team of three, myself included, enter Stillwater Bayou from the west. Weíre armed with an eclectic bunch of guns, but Iím actually hobbling myself a little this time by taking along the basic Springfield 1886, a one shot rifle that Iím not all that comfortable with. A hand crossbow as well, which Iím only marginally at home with - itís a great tool for killing all sorts of monsters in these Louisiana swamps, and crucially it is very quiet while doing so. Normally Iíd take a silenced Nagant revolver, far more my comfort zone, but I was simply too enchanted by my current hunter to alter his load-out, a tier one character by the name of Victor ĎHeadshotí Preston. With a name that try hard, I couldnít bring myself to give up anything he decided to join my roster with, even if it was arguably the worst single-shot rifle in the game.

My two friends have a stock Winfield repeater, a spiffy gun thatís much more capable than its Ďdefault weaponí status would imply, and something called the bomb lance. Itís a lance that shoots harpoon-like bombs, which makes it both fearsome and potentially debilitating depending on the fight youíre in. Not to mention obscenely loud, as all explosives are, a noise that can be heard from across the map. Gunshots are little different in this regard, but an explosion is unmistakable in its report, direction and relative proximity.

Deciding what to take with you on the hunt is half of the game itself. With the right tools, you can turn a desperate fight around. With the right gun, you can end one before itís had a chance to really begin. All rely on knowledge of their capabilities and a healthy dose of player skill.



The other half is a combination of things, but I can more or less sum it up as Ďluck, skill, and knowing where the gently caress youíre walking.í

We head to Blanchett Graves first, as it has two clues and is the closest to our starting location. Hunt is a game where the feeling of tension is there from start to finish, but thereís always that deceptive calm in the beginning where teams begin to orient themselves. The clues will let us track down the monster our hunters have taken it upon themselves to kill, banish, and claim their lucrative tokens for a fat stack of money. We head into Blanchett without much incident, killing a few grunts (your normal zombies) along the way. The bayou is alive with the sound of birds and swamp wildlife, wind rushing through the trees, groans of the undead and distant gunfire.

Frankly Iím usually relieved when someone is loudly shooting their gun almost immediately - it can be a sign of a team thatís not concerned with letting others know where they are, and confidence is a very useful thing to have in this game. More usually itís a mark of a bad team, though, one that doesnít realize that more canny hunters might decide to track them down first and eliminate the competition. Thereís a third, more uncommon option - sometimes a team will very promptly discover their target. Every round has either one or two, but the cursed abominations can spawn anywhere, even at the border areas, or the corners.

So in other words, we had no real idea what to make of it, and rarely do. Only a direction, which was southeast, in the half of the map containing the other bounty. We kept going, grabbing the clues and avoiding the more dangerous monsters, such as hives, immolaters, and hell hounds. We keep moving out of Blanchett and move further east, since that part of the map is still white (and places grayed out are where the monster isnít). More gunfire - about five minutes have passed, give or take, and this one keeps going for a while. As we continue, moving through the swamp water that slows us down and leaves us as easy targets to anyone with a sniperís scope, weíre careful to avoid environmental hazards thatíll betray our position. Crows, dry branches, cages with undead dogs or chickens within them. A dying horse that, when approached, will neigh incessantly until you put it down.

The lesser monsters, of course, but most of those can be handled quietly. A flock of crows disturbed by a cracked branch or noisy walk through water cannot be made quieter, but thereís ways around that too. Hunt has a lot of choices, depending on what you bring to the table.

The gunfire just keeps going, and we have a working theory - itís probably a fight. And they probably found their bounty. Like I said, noisy teams will attract attention from others. Thereís almost no way to conceal two teams meeting, inevitably devolving into an ultra violent confrontation of gun fire and explosions. Some get lucky with silenced weapons and melee tools, but thatís a rarity in my experience.

We find our target, blessedly quick - itís in Lockbay Docks, overlooking a wide stretch of open water. Still no sign of anyone else on our side of the map, and we get to killing it - the spider. The spider is quick and aggressive, pouncing on hunters and skittering across the ceiling and walls, making it a proper pain in the rear end to get a bead on. Itís also a spider, and even an over-sized one doesnít take kindly to being smashed with a giant hammer, or lit aflame. We employ as many of these tactics as we can to kill it as quickly and quietly as possible. As weíre doing this, the gunfire dies down, and weíre informed that one of the bounty monsters is being banished.



A banishing is a slow process, taking about five minutes or less - Iíve never timed it. Might not sound long, but in Hunt it might as well be an eternity. When you banish, every hunter on the map with you learns where thatís taking place. If itís the only bounty, youíre guaranteed to have hostile company soon. On a two-monster bounty, thereís a bit more wiggle room - maybe youíll get lucky, but never count on it. A banishment is a giant neon sign that says Ďcome get me.í When you use your dark sight (usually used to find clues and identify if anyone hostile is close to a bounty or clue), youíll see the banishment from across the map in the form of constant lightning strikes.

This is, needless to say, a harrowing process. Some banish and then flee, if theyíre not confident in fending off enemy hunters. Youíll make less money and experience for your hunter, but your odds of living to hunt again are better. If your hunter dies past a certain tutorial period, theyíre gone. All their upgrades, gear, and any cool look or dumb name you had for them, such as Headshot Preston. Knowing when to fold is useful.

Not that we ran, once the spider was dead. By the time we commenced our banishing, the other team had collected their bounty tokens, and my team watched the map carefully. Once a bounty token is down, itís visible on the map, and youíll see it move with the hunter who has it. Thereís no more being stealthy once youíve grabbed these tokens. Not all bad, though - your dark sight gives you five seconds of seeing close-by enemy hunters, a shock of orange, incredibly useful for fending off besieging hunters and not falling into ambushes as you flee with your prize.

We were watching to see where theyíd go - would they leave with their tokens, or try to come take ours as well? Turns out this team was feeling bloodthirsty, and we watched as their token markers started to approach us on the map, our position given away with the banishing of the spider. We immediately set to work, laying traps and setting up firing positions, identifying likely places of approach. Being under siege is never fun, and itís a trial of patience, resources and sheer gumption - if youíre assaulting, itís often better to mount a quick attack in force rather than let the defenders upgrade their dark sight and know exactly where you are. Thereís a lot that goes into the psychology of this game. Sweat the defenders long enough and they might get sloppy, skittish. The same applies to the attackers, too, and thereís a big difference between an impatient attack and a confident one.

But usually it just comes down to sheer luck and how smart your enemies are.

It took them two or three minutes to reach us, and the banishment was still ongoing - no sight for us, and plenty for them. Iím down in the bottom floor of Lockbay, a room with multiple entrances and a mesh wire view facing the water. I trap what I can and set up shop while my two buddies protect the floor above me, where the spider died. Sometimes a team will keep quiet on the attack, especially if the banishment hasnít concluded - more opportunity for stealth and advantageous positioning. These guys were not quiet, since they proceeded to lob just about every stick of dynamite, molotov cocktail and flash bomb in our direction. We pulled through, waiting for them to show themselves.

Where Iím sitting in the basement, itís just a lot of noise. Pounding footsteps above my head - I could shoot through if I wanted to, maybe even hit someone, but thatís a risky proposition with a one-shot weapon. I keep quiet and keep moving, waiting to see if anyone will come down or move through the water for a flank. Gunshots above me, plenty of them, explosions from the bomb lance. More gunfire to the west as a third team arrives on the scene, which our initial attackers clean up without much effort. Usually thatís a great opportunity for exploiting the chaos of up to nine hunters stomping around shooting each other, but we stay put, still needing to grab our tokens.

My friend with the Winfield goes down, shot in the head through a window. He can still get revived, if we live through this, but our odds just got worse. The tables turn when we hear another groan of death, killed by my remaining friendís sidearm. Two on two.



I hear a splash outside, past the mesh. Someone is crouching and moving slowly through the water, armed with a rifle. I aim and, true to my hunterís stupid loving name, hit them in the head. One left. I keep my position, because Iím pretty sure the last guy has a shotgun, and Iím not armed for that. More running around, my friend yelling at me to come up and support him, which is a classic conversation in any Hunt game, but I donít get the time to answer. My friend gets shot and goes down.

But heís not mad, far from it - I can hear glee in his voice, in fact. ďI traded,Ē he says, and a moment later I hear an explosion as the last enemy dies, shot in the last moment by my friendís bomb lance. He had enough time to run around and contemplate his impending demise, at least.

I go up and get them both back up. All is quiet. Traps are spent, all the monsters are dead, and thereís human bodies lying around now. We grab every bounty token and count ourselves lucky - itís great when the bounties come delivery. We do a quick scan through dark sight and confirm weíre alone. I grab a high tier rifle off the woman in the water I killed, leaving the Springfield behind.

And then we leave, all four tokens in hand - only two drop per boss. No one stops us - weíve cleared the map of enemy hunters, which is always a fantastic feeling. At least, weíre 90% sure itís clear. No oneís contesting, anyway, so we fire off to our heartís content, no longer worried about noise or stealth. We make a lazy line towards an extraction point, wait the thirty seconds (during which pursuing hunters can and will try to murder you), and then extract. We get a fat payday of hunter experience used to give characters new traits and abilities, and a whole lot of money. Headshot Preston gets a whole bunch of upgrades, and I spec him out for rifle shooting.

The very next hunt, we all die, our characters flushed down the drain like tissue paper, leaving us only with halved money and bloodline experience (the measure of your overall progression, which affects unlockable weapons, traits and items). Rest in loving peace, Victor ĎHeadshotí Preston. So it goes in the bayou. The hunt after that, we kill three more hunters in under ten seconds, and then cleanly extract with no contest in about ten minutes. The one after thatÖ

And so on, and so forth. Play Hunt: Showdown if you want to feel stressed out almost constantly, twitch at every errant sound, kill your way tactically through repulsive monsters as quietly as you can, and have high stakes shootouts with other, equally greedy players. No round will be the same. The story above is just one example - there's so many things to consider. Thereís no other game quite like it on the market.

Erwin the German fucked around with this message at 00:57 on Jun 30, 2021

Electromax
May 6, 2007


Zaphod42 posted:

How does the more recent PC REMake compare to the GC version?

It's more or less the same. Backgrounds were AI upscaled I think, new (similar) models were used, and maybe some lighting effects were added in some screens but most everything is the same to the untrained eye.

The biggest difference in the "HD Remaster" era releases are a control scheme that allows you to move without tank controls which makes it a lot easier, you can spin the joystick to do 360s and dance in and out of zombie reach in ways that were impossible in the older, intentionally slow and clunky setup.

e:

BiggerBoat posted:

My effort post was on the original but I'm sure the remake is superior. I gave it a run a few years back but my muscle memory was shot with everything having to do with tank controls and I pussed out on it. Also, those maps you made are cool as hell.

I missed your post originally, but just read it. Great summary, I only played RE2 back then but I played Alone in the Dark on floppy disk before the PS1 days and had similar feelings about that creepy mansion and camera angles and inexplicable items.

Electromax fucked around with this message at 00:49 on Jun 30, 2021

BiggerBoat
Sep 26, 2007

For That you Get the Head...

The Tail...

The Whole Damned Thing

Erwin the German posted:

Prey (2017)

Deus Ex


That was a great write up on Prey and the Deus Ex comparison is really apt. It's fantastic and really immersive (Half Life also comes to mind). I loved this loving game but never finished it because somehow, even though you seem to imply it's almost impossible to do, I got to a point where I nerfed out and realized I hosed myself over where I totally hit a difficulty wall with it and wanted to go back and make different choices.

I probably could have wormed my way out of it but my outlook seemed pretty dire when I put it down.

Electromax
May 6, 2007


I love System Shock 2 and the first Bioshock, I never knew Prey was in that vein. I saw your post and thought, wasn't that some game about a Native American guy with superpowers to run on ceilings or something? Eventually I realized there was a NEW game that is very much relevant to my interests - gonna pick it up ASAP.

Zaphod42
Sep 13, 2012

If there's anything more important than my ego around, I want it caught and shot now.


Electromax posted:

I love System Shock 2 and the first Bioshock, I never knew Prey was in that vein. I saw your post and thought, wasn't that some game about a Native American guy with superpowers to run on ceilings or something? Eventually I realized there was a NEW game that is very much relevant to my interests - gonna pick it up ASAP.

Yep. Prey (the second one, stupid name) is an ImmSim, or a 0451 game, like Deus Ex and Bioshock.

Zaphod42 posted:

Goddamn the marketing team hosed them, the name really screwed that game. Call it SpaceShock and it would have sold 10x more copies.

Canine Blues Arooo
Jan 7, 2008

when you think about it...i'm the first girl you ever spent the night with



Grimey Drawer

Prey 2017 is such a cool game. It's a masterclass in 3D level design and has outstanding scenarios - it really feels like the entire game was a team executing on a tight vision. It will probably have a niche-ish audience, but I fully expect it to be a game that transcends time and is forever recommended as one of those games that any budding gamer must try.

haveblue
Aug 15, 2005




Toilet Rascal

Prey 2017 has the same sort of map design as Dark Souls, where not only do you have free travel between all the areas but the areas are built to make sense when combined in 3D space and you gradually become aware of how the world fits together around itself (especially when you can go outside and fly around the entire station)

Zaphod42
Sep 13, 2012

If there's anything more important than my ego around, I want it caught and shot now.


haveblue posted:

Prey 2017 has the same sort of map design as Dark Souls, where not only do you have free travel between all the areas but the areas are built to make sense when combined in 3D space and you gradually become aware of how the world fits together around itself (especially when you can go outside and fly around the entire station)

Yeah it has the same sort of unlocking and discovering shortcuts and learning to map the space in your head for fast traversal.

That said, I agree with Anderson that maybe a little less back-tracking would be nice :)

dead gay comedy forums
Oct 21, 2011




Unreal Tourna-loving-ment 2k4
(for appropriate mood and ambience, we suggest the reader to please slam down a Monster can in two gulps, blast some Ritalin/Adderall and put some techno of their choice)



Counter-Strike and Team Fortress and Battlefields, go cower in the shadow; Apex Legends and Overwatches, lie down and kiss the floor in humility; Calls of Duty, eat the dust of your mediocrity away from the sight of the King; as for the rest, do not even dare to come close, for you are unworthy. The greatest FPS multiplayer experience ever achieved in PC gaming bar none in the opinion of the writer, UT2k4 was a playable, interactive fever dream of William Gibson slammed together with the speed-induced frenzy of Jean-Paul Sartre in his creative flashes. If you were feeling hyper in just the right way, it was possible to imagine that this was a taste of the entertainment of the future to come. Perhaps there would not be literal cybergladiators with literal shock rifles in literal low-orbit skyscrapers, but perhaps you could play games that would allow you to feel pretty loving close to that.



That is to say, to feel loving awesome. UT2k4 carried itself with tremendous swagger and brash over-the-top inanity that was just loving right, perfecting the formula that started with the first Tournament back in 1999. Absurdly dynamic and incredibly kinetic; an exquisitely appropriate soundtrack; arguably the best FPS arsenal ever - each and every weapon feels relevant somehow and are fun to use; maps that were these gorgeous, luxurious, outright ostentatious displays of bling (because Epic had an engine to license as well); the whole game is a spectacular effort of maximalism and thankfully so. Every single time that I played Facing Worlds I thought this was a ridiculous game in all the best ways possible, grinning as I ate rockets that I never did see coming.



The story? Something about miners getting bread and circuses after the wars of the original Unreal, with the megacorp responsible setting up the tournament. Then there is some pretty barebones fluff about the fighters, their teams and the maps. Yeah yeah whatever. Personally, however poor that background was, I have a tremendous grudge about this. The reason being that the single-player had this sketch, an amazing idea really, that somehow nobody else around followed through - no one - and made me bitter. You had to qualify and then start to build your team by hiring NPCs and such, and earning wins and bonuses allowed to buy better NPCsÖ Look, Iíve played Football Manager for hours upon hours upon hours. Suddenly, UT2k4 tossed at me the idea of a ďFuture Shooting Tactics ManagerĒ and just how come this idea has not been further developed in any way shape or form? A game where I can hire past seasonís underrated cyborg bruiser to make him into an all-star pick, stomping fools all the way to the playoffs? Tears. A mere cyberpunk mirage, never to be materialized.



In line with the ďcreature of its own timeĒ theme of my last reviews, UT2k4 is very much the same. The reason why I picked this one instead of the 1999 original is refinement: both are essentially the same games, the 2004 version a much more polished one. Although I have never been too much of a fan of FPS games, UT2k4 was enrapturing in its incredible execution of conventions established, while also allowing bringing a lot to the table in its own way. Not that it was all good: Onslaught mode felt rather out of place in comparison to, say, Assault. An attempt to do what the newcomer Battlefield has brought to the scene, maybe? When it missed, it happened because it was trying to do things that were not Unreal Tournament. Vehicles, personally, never were part of that.

This was a peak point before the major shift led by Counter-Strike, Battlefield and Call of Duty took hold of the FPS conventions. The multiplayer was good but there was this feel for, I donít know, a certain kind of glitz to the experience that made it great. That maximalism I talked about earlier on. Besides a plethora of modes and spectacular maps to play in, you had mutators, a modification in the game rules that could be merely cosmetic to be completely game-changing. For instance, the legendary instagib mutator made super shock rifles (a modification that could one-hit-kill in spectacular instantaneous blasts) the only weapons available and everything became somehow more frenetic to the point of ridicularity. Air Control and Quad Jump turned the players into futuristic Michael Jordans of deathmatch, turning jumps into small flights. These settings could turn modes and maps around to play very much differently than the standard rules, allowing for many fun variations on the same theme. The spice of life in FPS design: quad jump and rockets in a cloistered capture-the-flag map was an entirely different experience than standard mode.



Most of all, for myself, what matters most from UT2k4 is the shift, in a way of speaking. When compared to what came after, I canít help but feel a loss of aesthetic ambition. Halo, even with its sci-fi allowing for tremendous creative license, never overcame the much older Marathon if you look at it close enough. The original Borderlands perhaps offers a small degree of that feeling, but more as an unintended side-effect: to be outrageously over-the-top to be whiplash-inducing is not maximalism. UT2k4 is an incredibly rich and elaborate dessert; games like Borderlands are chocolate cake with chocolate frosting with chocolate chips and chocolate ice cream and so on and on.

ďMORE!Ē works until a certain point, but it will never beat ambitious vision, especially when it comes to visual artistry. Given video games, having yellows and greens and blues is a great differential, especially considering the technological limitations then present compared to now. UT2k4 was spectacular to watch and remains a very fun shooter to play to this day.

haveblue
Aug 15, 2005




Toilet Rascal

All my techno of choice is already from the Unreal games :hellyeah:

I remember reading about how UT2k3 would have ONE HUNDRED TIMES as much geometric detail as the previous games, and I had no idea how that was even possible in this reality, because I didn't know about vertex buffer objects at the time

haveblue fucked around with this message at 18:12 on Jun 30, 2021

doctorfrog
Mar 14, 2007

Great.



Copy *.umx from every classic Unreal Engine game, shuffle play in XMPlay forever.

luchadornado
Oct 7, 2004

A boombox is not a toy!



The first time I played UT and specifically Facing Worlds was at a lan party with like 16 people. Seriously one of the best gaming experiences in my life.

Gynovore
Jun 17, 2009

Forget your RoboCoX or your StickyCoX or your EvilCoX, MY CoX has Blinking Bewbs!

WHY IS THIS GAME DEAD?!

The real joy of the Unreal series was the insane amount of mutators, which were basically mods but with integrated support. There were hundreds and hundreds of good ones. The pinnacle was "Unreal Forever", which added a bajillion weapons and some cool play modes.

Chadzok
Apr 25, 2002



UT99 was my favourite, and I still go back and play the single player every couple years. The music and the voices are seared into my memory banks.

"Die, bitch!"
"Dirtbag!"
"You suck!"
*gargling scream as someone eats 8 rockets to the face*

Big ups to the original Unreal too that doesn't hold up in the modern day but had some really memorable moments of stepping out into huge areas on a scale well above other first persons shooters of the time as super cool ambient techno plays and some distant giant enemy lobs boulders in your general direction. I'd love an Unreal Black Mesa or a Doom style reimagining, but the success of Fortnite has hosed that dream (and the hopes for a modern Unreal Tournament).

haveblue
Aug 15, 2005




Toilet Rascal

*falling into lava, fumbling open the voice menu* ďIím on fire!Ē

VideoGames
Aug 18, 2003



There have been some amazing posts in here and I especially love the UT2K4 one.

So many hundreds upon hundreds of hours playing that. Facing Worlds being one of the most ridiculous maps, or the two vehicles one.

I had a bullet time mutator and when you pushed the start key you would have an audio clip of Morpheus saying 'You gotta let it all go Neo. Freee....yooooouuurrrr.....minnnndddd' and the last three words would get stretched out and you would be able to do amazing stuff.

UT2K4 RPG with stats from kills and whatnot was also fantastic. It was also the first game I remember having great fun with ragdoll physics compared to Half Life 2.

Shine
Feb 26, 2007

No Muscles For The Majority


If I were making my big post a decade ago, the space I spent gushing about Monster Hunter World would've been used for UT instead. I'll always loving love that game. :allears:

The iconic UT experience for me is Color Instagib CTF-Coret. Feels like a real laser tag arena, and I've played who knows how many thousands of rounds of that map over the years (including a few just the other day).

Matrix Moves and Lazy Matrix were dope UT mutators. Infiltration was my favorite total conversion (seeing Ground Branch pop up Steam the other day reminded me of it, holy poo poo). Excessive Overkill was always a LAN party crowd pleaser. And then you had really out there poo poo like that Mechwarrior-like total conversion whose name I always forget. Also loved Strangelove, which let you ride the Redeemer :lol:

Zaphod42
Sep 13, 2012

If there's anything more important than my ego around, I want it caught and shot now.


UT2k4 was a golden age in that it felt like you could do anything. There were SO MANY game modes, things like Onslaught and Assault felt like real innovations compared to the team deathmatches and CTFs of the shooters before it. Vehicles felt amazing, maps were huge, and action was FAST.

I think I have even more nostalgia for the original UT though.

Gaj
Apr 30, 2006


Im an idiot and I lost a game. Its on steam, fps, wireframe. XSHOT something. Time crawed to a stop when you werent moving, so you could stand still and do matrix shooting moves. It was a surrealist game where it turned out you were being sent to kill yourself, jacked into a cyberpunk internet.

haveblue
Aug 15, 2005




Toilet Rascal

SUPER

HOT

Regy Rusty
Apr 26, 2010



How could you forget the most innovative shooter you played in years

Gaj
Apr 30, 2006


I did one play through and I smoked about 2oz a month for every year its been. I do vividly remember G-NOME.

Electromax
May 6, 2007


Superhot is the must-play PSVR game I have when people wanna try.

Shine
Feb 26, 2007

No Muscles For The Majority


Gaj posted:

Im an idiot and I lost a game. Its on steam, fps, wireframe. XSHOT something. Time crawed to a stop when you werent moving, so you could stand still and do matrix shooting moves. It was a surrealist game where it turned out you were being sent to kill yourself, jacked into a cyberpunk internet.

For future reference, there's a thread for this specific sort of thing, frequented by magicians who can pull up the name of a game from 1987 based on the most vague description.

https://forums.somethingawful.com/showthread.php?threadid=2925708

Shine
Feb 26, 2007

No Muscles For The Majority


Shine posted:

And then you had really out there poo poo like that Mechwarrior-like total conversion whose name I always forget.

Neo Cairo!!

Good Soldier Svejk
Jul 5, 2010





Just recently did a replay of this (and now moving on to Dishonored 2 again) and I just want to echo all of this. Arkane, at least that era of Arkane, were firing on all cylinders with game design.
Everything about the level design just oooooozes style and polish and consideration it feels like they spent years building it and yet it is cohesive and it makes you feel so clever when you find the vent or the tricky little way to get somewhere with the gloo gun.

Love that game, love this studio.

GazChap
Dec 4, 2004

I'm hungry. Feed me.

So, I'm very much what I'd these days call an "old-school" gamer - I first started playing computer games back in the very late 80s on my Sinclair ZX Spectrum+, and although there are a number of games I played on that venerable machine that I consider to be amazing to this day, I'm not here to talk about any of them.

After my Speccy, I upgraded to a Commodore Amiga 1200 and I loved that machine like it was no other. I got it in 1993 when I was 10, and I reluctantly sold it around 2005 after a messy divorce meant I needed money to relocate. It was a completely different machine by the time I sold it - upgraded from the base 14MHz 68020 processor with 2MB of RAM and in-built graphics and no hard disk, to a monstrously fast 50MHz 68060, 16MB of RAM, a 40GB hard disk and even a Voodoo 3 graphics card.

I spent pretty much all of my time on that machine, gaming and learning how to code, and although I don't work in gamedev I have dabbled in it and my day to day job is in software dev.

But enough of all that bollocks, you didn't come here to read my life story - but this preamble is basically my way of saying that the games that follow are ones that I played a LOT and they all pretty much had some lasting impact on my life in subtle (and not so subtle) ways...

So, what's first?

Let's go with a game that was the cause of much controversy when it was released, with some UK newspapers calling for it to be banned. No, it's not Grand Theft Auto - that never made it to the Amiga (despite the developers, DMA Design, cutting their teeth on the platform with games like Lemmings and Walker) - I'm talking about Sensible Software's most infamous title, Cannon Fodder.



The game with one of the catchiest title songs ever (and even a typically Sensible music video to go with it), Cannon Fodder is a game about attrition and the futility of war.

There's no plot to speak of, just that you are commanding a military force and must complete missions, each with varying objectives and more often than not split up into multiple phases. These objectives might be as simple as killing all of the enemy soldiers, but often you'll have to destroy all of their buildings and sometimes avoid killing innocent people (although that's surprisingly rare, there's generally no penalty for collateral damage in this game - much like real life, eh?)



The visuals might look simplistic, but remember this game came out in 1993.

You start each mission (and phase) with a set number of soldiers, usually 1-5, and if they all die you have to start the phase again. The game's concept of "lives" is taken very literally, before each mission starts you see Boot Hill, your recruitment centre and memorial ground all in one:



There's always a willing queue of folk looking to join the war effort, and even though initially Boot Hill starts off completely empty, chances are it won't be long before headstones of fallen soldiers appear as above, and as you progress further it likely ends up more akin to this:



After every successful mission, some more people join the queue of recruits (15 I think) but as the missions get harder, the quicker your soldiers start to die and with every restart that queue of recruits starts to get shorter and shorter. Run out of willing cannon fodder, and it's game over.

And boy, do those missions get harder.

There are 24 missions in total, and 72 phases between those. As with all good games, the missions start out relatively easy and get you used to the various game mechanics quickly (but this was before the age of in-game tutorials, so you've still got to work a lot out for yourself!)

Missions 1-3 are generally fairly painless, with mission 3 being the first to introduce the dreaded "slippy slidey ice world" trope - snow-filled levels that cause your soldiers to slip a little while walking at seemingly random intervals, but always in a tight spot when you really can't afford them to slip.

Missions 4-7 are a little harder (one phase in mission 4 in particular leaves you very little breathing room to get your bearings when you first start!) but they're never unfair.

Everything changes at mission 8 - quite famously so. The difficulty level for Mission 8 suddenly ramps up to being ludicrously steep, with countless near-invisible booby traps, rocket-toting baddies that keep you constantly on your toes lest you get blown up, and again very little time to get your bearings before things start going south. Should you somehow manage to get past it the rest of the game stays at around that level or easier.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tVxPfbJIEm4

An excellently intuitive control scheme helps with the difficulty - left click to tell your soldiers where to move, hold right click to shoot in the direction of the crosshair, and left click while holding the right click to launch a grenade or rocket. What would eventually be called twitch gaming has, as the title music suggests, never been so much fun.

I played this game for YEARS and never saw the end of the game. In fact, I don't recall making it past mission 16 so I still had a good quarter of the game left to go. It was just punishingly hard, yet still strangely enjoyable.

It received a sequel - the imaginatively titled Cannon Fodder 2 - which was really just a "mission pack" more than an outright sequel, there were no new features per se, just a new set of 24 missions, a decidely weird plot about alien invasions and, of course, a new title song. The 24 missions of the sequel were designed specifically to be less punishing, but ironically enough (and as would be seen again in games like Half-Life) the alien levels in the game were generally awful and probably made a lot of players stop playing.

So, why did it have an impact on my life? Well, to my 11 year old self (I didn't get hold of the game until a year after release) it was the first time that I'd played a game that made me think - and I don't mean in a "puzzling" sense, I mean truly think about what the game was saying.

The game had a stark anti-war message, pretty much everything that it did was designed to foster this idea that war was futile, horrific and not A Good Idea.

From the aforementioned Boot Hill showing the headstones of the dead, to the way that some enemies didn't die when you shot them and instead lay on the floor bleeding out, screaming in agony until either time or your rifle put them out of their misery, to the lack of penalty for killing civilians, and even down to the (originally unskippable) "Lost in Service" screen that appeared after every successful mission:



Every soldier in the game has a name (and a first name, at that) and if you finally manage to complete a tough multi-phase mission after losing hundreds of recruits in the process, then the game will scroll through each one of those now-dead soldiers on this screen, really driving home the point.

As your soldiers successfully completed missions, they would be promoted up the ranks (with bonuses to shooting distances and other attributes) and by Christ it was genuinely upsetting to lose a soldier that had been with you for 12 missions.

To my 11 year old brain, this was something that I hadn't really had to think about before, but it changed my outlook on such things. Not that I was particularly pro-war or anything, you know, and I wouldn't call myself a pacifist or even an activist, but I'd never really given it much thought up until playing Cannon Fodder.

So, why was it controversial, and why was it almost banned? Was it the (some would say) gratuitous violence, or the very adult themes on display? Perhaps something as silly as the title music claiming that war has never been so much fun?

No, it was stupider than even that.

You'll note that the title screen of the game way up at the top of this post features a poppy - known across the whole of the UK (and I assume the world?) as a symbol of remembrance, and a reminder of the horror of war. Nowadays of course, it seems to come with a solid helping of jingoism as well, but these were simpler (and less divisive) times.

The poppy also featured on the game's original box art - and the Royal British Legion, the UK charity that organises yearly Poppy Appeals for Remembrance Sunday, took exception to the use of the poppy ("their" symbol) and before long the media picked up on it, decrying this awful game that "glorified war" and trampled all over the memories of our war dead, and (of course) called for it to be banned.

In the end, they changed the box art but were allowed to keep the title screen poppy, but they had to add a disclaimer at the start: "This game is not endorsed by the Royal British Legion."

It seems that many of the people that you'd expect to have picked up on the not-particularly-subtle messages within the game actually missed them entirely and came to the complete opposite conclusion - but I suppose this is hardly a surprise, how many other times have the media had a knee-jerk reaction to a video game and run with it?

Ms Adequate
Oct 29, 2011

Baby even when I'm dead and gone
You will always be my only one, my only one
When the night is calling
No matter who I become
You will always be my only one, my only one, my only one
When the night is calling





Cannon Fodder was extremely good and like you I didn't finish it, didn't even get close. It was a fantastic time though.

Hardly surprising that in the early 90s the talking heads and so on would completely miss the point no matter how obvious it was, I doubt today they'd be capable of getting it right (Though today's Britain would be much less likely to have a problem with glorifying war, seems to be the opposite is what causes offense among the powers that be :v:)

Whybird
Aug 2, 2009

Phaiston have long avoided the tightly competetive defence sector, but the IRDA Act 2052 has given us the freedom we need to bring out something really special.

https://team-robostar.itch.io/robostar




Nap Ghost

Ms Adequate posted:

Cannon Fodder was extremely good and like you I didn't finish it, didn't even get close. It was a fantastic time though.

Hardly surprising that in the early 90s the talking heads and so on would completely miss the point no matter how obvious it was, I doubt today they'd be capable of getting it right (Though today's Britain would be much less likely to have a problem with glorifying war, seems to be the opposite is what causes offense among the powers that be :v:)

Oh yeah, if it were released today there's no doubt it'd get slammed for mocking our troops' glorious and noble sacrifices instead. The poppy is basically a symbol on a par with the American flag over here: chuds poo poo themselves with fury if you dare disrespect it while simultaneously doing poo poo like this:

GazChap
Dec 4, 2004

I'm hungry. Feed me.

Ms Adequate posted:

(Though today's Britain would be much less likely to have a problem with glorifying war, seems to be the opposite is what causes offense among the powers that be :v:)
Yeah, I wonder whether - if it was released today - it would be seen in the same light, or whether it would be branded as "woke" or some such bollocks.

Whybird posted:

Oh yeah, if it were released today there's no doubt it'd get slammed for mocking our troops' glorious and noble sacrifices instead. The poppy is basically a symbol on a par with the American flag over here: chuds poo poo themselves with fury if you dare disrespect it while simultaneously doing poo poo like this:

The cognitive dissonance on display in the people that came up with that campaign is absolutely loving ridiculous.

The rampant jingoism and "if you don't wear a poppy for Remembrance Day you may as well just call yourself Goebbels and have done with it" surrounding it all is the primary reason I don't wear a poppy. I used to donate to the RBL but once they started putting their names to campaigns like the one in that picture I noped out.

Going back to Cannon Fodder, one element I'd forgotten to mention was that Amiga Power (an Amiga games magazine notable for its irreverent sense of humour and no-nonsense approach to game reviewing) also had to change their cover for the issue that reviewed Cannon Fodder, as it featured the same poppy on the front.

Stuart Campbell, who was the magazine's editor at the time (I think, if not then he was a senior staffer for sure) put a little off-hand remark in the next issue saying "Old soldiers? I wish them all dead" which re-ignited the whole controversy again, and possibly led to even greater sales for the game.

Campbell went on to leave Amiga Power and join Sensible, where he was more or less responsible for Cannon Fodder 2 - designing most, if not all, of that game's missions. He has a great write up about it here

Of course, nowadays he's almost certainly more famous as the outspoken Scottish nationalist behind Wings Over Scotland, but I prefer to remember him as one of the guys behind Amiga Power - easily one of my two favourite computer magazines; the second being Your Sinclair for the Speccy, which in many ways AP was a spiritual successor to.

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Parkingtigers
Feb 23, 2008
TARGET CONSUMER
LOVES EVERY FUCKING GAME EVER MADE. EVER.


Cannon Fodder was great, count me amongst those who never finished that balls hard game. Had a great time dying and failing though.

GazChap posted:

Stuart Campbell, who was the magazine's editor at the time (I think, if not then he was a senior staffer for sure) put a little off-hand remark in the next issue saying "Old soldiers? I wish them all dead" which re-ignited the whole controversy again, and possibly led to even greater sales for the game.

Campbell went on to leave Amiga Power and join Sensible, where he was more or less responsible for Cannon Fodder 2 - designing most, if not all, of that game's missions. He has a great write up about it here

Of course, nowadays he's almost certainly more famous as the outspoken Scottish nationalist behind Wings Over Scotland, but I prefer to remember him as one of the guys behind Amiga Power - easily one of my two favourite computer magazines; the second being Your Sinclair for the Speccy, which in many ways AP was a spiritual successor to.

In milkshake duck news, that guy is unfortunately also a massively transphobic piece of poo poo these days and also blamed all the deaths at the Hillsborough disaster on Liverpool fans... beginning to think the "old soldiers" line wasn't just youthful edgelord stuff.

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