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Doll House Ghost
Jun 18, 2011





Phenotype posted:

I figured this would be an ok place to ask: Is it really stupid to get carpeting put in if the budget can stretch enough to get vinyl plank flooring?

I've seen that the planks last much much longer, are easier to clean, improve the resale value of the home... I just don't think I like em! I prefer going barefoot at home and I hate the idea of putting my feet down on cold hardwood flooring in Michigan winters, the dog and cat are not gonna enjoy running around the den or down the hallway (the dog already somewhat avoids the kitchen), and I don't like the idea of getting down on a hard floor to play with them either. And yet everything I read and all my family's advice is that I'm being stupid to consider wasting money on carpeting rather than spend 2-3x the price on hardwood.

How about Marmoleum? It feels really nice under bare feet (kinda soft and warm), is durable and the tile version is very easy to put down. It's also reasonably priced.

In the end it's your house, so choose the material you like.

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peanut
Sep 9, 2007




Pale green and wood are obvious bffs, go for it

actionjackson
Jan 12, 2003

your living room looks like shit

Has anyone here ever gotten a PPG paint sample at home depot?

My place came with a couple paints that they previous owner didn't leave the name of. I found something very similar in my benjamin moore packet, but ideally I'd like to "reverse engineer" and find the actual RGB values of those paints (I got the sample from taking a piece off the wall).

All I have is what's pictured, and I have no idea what it means or if it's useful.

one other paint question: how does the finish of a paint affect the LRV? presumably eggshell should result in a higher LRV than flat or matte.

Only registered members can see post attachments!

actionjackson
Jan 12, 2003

your living room looks like shit

Phenotype posted:

I figured this would be an ok place to ask: Is it really stupid to get carpeting put in if the budget can stretch enough to get vinyl plank flooring?

I've seen that the planks last much much longer, are easier to clean, improve the resale value of the home... I just don't think I like em! I prefer going barefoot at home and I hate the idea of putting my feet down on cold hardwood flooring in Michigan winters, the dog and cat are not gonna enjoy running around the den or down the hallway (the dog already somewhat avoids the kitchen), and I don't like the idea of getting down on a hard floor to play with them either. And yet everything I read and all my family's advice is that I'm being stupid to consider wasting money on carpeting rather than spend 2-3x the price on hardwood.

I wouldn't get vinyl plank flooring because from what I recall it can be damaged by direct sunlight

you can get laminate planks that look just like real wood and are much more affordable and durable. That's what I did. $2/SF materials and about the same for labor.

I also have a dog, I just got a few rugs, and I made sure the laminate I got has enough "stick" so it's not super slippery. There are ones that are super smooth and slippery (for pets), and ones that have very visible texture that result in a lot of grip.

alnilam posted:


Second question: my wife and I both have a preference for naturalistic aesthetics. Plants, wood, etc. We've always dreamed of a live-edge or otherwise natural wood looking dining room table. But we also have hardwood floors in the dining room, which I find very lovely btw. Does a natural wood looking table clash with hardwood floors, or can it work?


A natural wood table would work just fine with hardwood floors. I assume the table legs are also the same wood, in which I would just make sure they aren't super similar in color. For example if you have a medium brown walnut colored floor, maple legs on a table would work well. I'm sure there are some live edge tables with non-wood leg options as well. A few other options to have more variety are a rug under the table (though I see why you wouldn't want to do that), and having chairs made of a different material, or at least the chair legs, for example perforated steel.

actionjackson fucked around with this message at 00:36 on Mar 4, 2021

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




alnilam posted:

Hello friends. I bought a house and expect to have a number of questions but here are the first two. I feel like I'm good at seeing when something looks good or bad but I'm awful at envisioning how something will look when it's done.

Our living room came painted a boring but acceptable slate grey. Kaiser Schnitzel mentioned the color Cooking Apple Green a bit ago and I really like the look of it. But I'm having a hard time telling if it will work in this living room. This window is kind of the focus of the room so I painted it there as a sample (forgive the tape in one of the shots). I imagine it might be hard to really tell from photos but here's hoping.



Second question: my wife and I both have a preference for naturalistic aesthetics. Plants, wood, etc. We've always dreamed of a live-edge or otherwise natural wood looking dining room table. But we also have hardwood floors in the dining room, which I find very lovely btw. Does a natural wood looking table clash with hardwood floors, or can it work?
Here is the dining area with current temporary table. Forgive the moving mess on the counter. Also worth noting that this is contiguous with the living room above, so it would take whatever color goes in the living room.

I’m biased but I think the color looks nice. More interesting than the grey but not overwhelming. Put a rug down and get whatever table you like imo. I think you’d have better luck with a warmer wood like cherry, mahogany, maybe maple than a cooler wood like oak. Walnut can be very warm with age but American black walnut starts off a little dark and green is going to make it darker. I have a client with an oiled cherry sideboard in front of that exact color and it looks great.

alnilam
Nov 10, 2009


Posting in the springtime


Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

I’m biased but I think the color looks nice. More interesting than the grey but not overwhelming. Put a rug down and get whatever table you like imo. I think you’d have better luck with a warmer wood like cherry, mahogany, maybe maple than a cooler wood like oak. Walnut can be very warm with age but American black walnut starts off a little dark and green is going to make it darker. I have a client with an oiled cherry sideboard in front of that exact color and it looks great.

Hmm I think a lot of what's available out here for a live edge slab is firs and cedars.

e: hmm looks like plenty of hardwood available around here after all, as well as redwood

alnilam fucked around with this message at 02:49 on Mar 4, 2021

Yooper
Apr 30, 2012



Grimey Drawer

Update! What I thought was faux indoor logs with a slight radius is actually cupped from past water damage. We're ordering all new tongue and groove. Looking at either birch or aspen. Beyond that I've got a structural engineer coming in two months to scope out moving the beam. Also going to be replacing the floral style lighting with something more neutral. I hate browsing lights online, hard to get a grasp of scale. Almost as bad staring up at Home Depot in the semi sauna that is the lighting department.

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




alnilam posted:

Hmm I think a lot of what's available out here for a live edge slab is firs and cedars.
Those would be more orangey/blonde which is probably the right direction? Idk if it gets big enough for slabs, but alder can look a lot like cherry and west coast big leaf maple can be pretty wild.

actionjackson
Jan 12, 2003

your living room looks like shit

I agree I think that green paint looks fine, but I would paint a square in other areas too, for example right above (and bordering) the moulding so you can see how it interacts with that and the floor. If the walls get different amounts of light I would do samples on the other walls as well. Always a good idea to sample as much as you can.

UnkleBoB
Jul 24, 2000

Beginner's Version, Copyright,
1991 - Please Copy and Distribute


kreeningsons posted:

I love these things so much. I’m tempted to get one of the mirror finish plated silver ones.

Yeah, the silver ones are great and don't have the premium above the normal colors in the same way that the gold and copper do (I'd love a copper one tbqh).

I got some samples of Bludot's Vesper fabrics and am quite surprised at how different they look in person compared to the online photos. Made me really glad I didn't just up and order an ottoman.

actionjackson
Jan 12, 2003

your living room looks like shit

UnkleBoB posted:

Yeah, the silver ones are great and don't have the premium above the normal colors in the same way that the gold and copper do (I'd love a copper one tbqh).

I got some samples of Bludot's Vesper fabrics and am quite surprised at how different they look in person compared to the online photos. Made me really glad I didn't just up and order an ottoman.

yeah, this is why you always get samples. I'm pretty sure the blu dot furniture that they use for their website pics is photographed under VERY bright light. I live in Minneapolis where they are based so I check out their stuff in person pretty often.

By the way, I was actually considering getting one of their ottomans (the hecks model), but I would also recommend checking out softline, who I ended up ordering from. They kind of specialize in this kind of thing and have a bazillion models and fabric choices. I got the lake model in a charcoal color for less than the hecks model, though it's taking two months to arrive because it all ships out of Denmark.

https://www.danishdesignstore.com/collections/ottomans?system_vendor=softline&q=

UnkleBoB
Jul 24, 2000

Beginner's Version, Copyright,
1991 - Please Copy and Distribute


I used to sell Softline in the early 2000s when I worked at a fancy furniture store, and I somehow always forget they exist.

actionjackson
Jan 12, 2003

your living room looks like shit

here's a good example, left is the peek dresser on their website, right is in person at their outlet

Only registered members can see post attachments!

UnkleBoB
Jul 24, 2000

Beginner's Version, Copyright,
1991 - Please Copy and Distribute


This violet Componibili is quite nice. Ordering another to stack on top of it since my girlfriend wants it taller.

actionjackson
Jan 12, 2003

your living room looks like shit

looks good! they do sell a three and four drawer version

actionjackson fucked around with this message at 19:16 on Mar 6, 2021

UnkleBoB
Jul 24, 2000

Beginner's Version, Copyright,
1991 - Please Copy and Distribute


Does anyone have experience with floating shelf systems like String? Thinking of putting something together but want to hear about experience people have had with them.

bird with big dick
Oct 21, 2015




Is this the thread where I ask people's opinions about some remodeling work I want to have done and get told all my ideas are stupid and bad?

Our kitchen sucks and we would like to improve it somewhat. We're doing this just for us and aren't planning on selling the house anytime soon but I want to get some opinions because I don't want to spend 20 grand and make my house worse in the eyes of the average home buyer, just in case we do have to sell it for some reason.

e: looks like it is, typing something up now.

bird with big dick fucked around with this message at 16:06 on Mar 13, 2021

falz
Jan 29, 2005

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This thread may be most appropriate but I'm sure either is fine.

https://forums.somethingawful.com/showthread.php?threadid=3770037

bird with big dick
Oct 21, 2015




falz posted:

This thread may be most appropriate but I'm sure either is fine.

https://forums.somethingawful.com/showthread.php?threadid=3770037

You're right though I think I'm gonna give it a shot here just because I'm really more concerned about the kinda design/layout aspects of it than the mechanical aspects of it, at least at this point.

Our kitchen is too small and has insufficient storage and countertop area and the pantry is unlit and small and the island is meh and there's this useless vestigial breakfast nook and stupid half bath hallway and also the laundry room sucks poo poo etc. We both love to cook and bake and we don't have enough room for gadgets and appliances, don't have enough pantry room, and don't have enough counter space.

The house in general is great and the kitchen is really the only bad aspect of it so I think the rest of the house warrants spending some money on the kitchen situation as long as it's spent intelligently. I think we'll probably end up hiring someone to do a couple designs for us (find them on Yelp or something?)

Incorrectly illustrated aspects due to my laziness and/or incompetence:
1. Those aren't actually French doors, they're sliders.
2. The dumb pillars and header thing between the kitchen and nook also exists between the kitchen and dining area but is not illustrated properly because I measured something wrong, you can see the pillars but the header isn't shown in the 3d views.
3. The slider in the nook doesn't get as close to the wall as is shown, there's room to do a ~25" lower counter depth on two sides, leaving the slider.
4. Ignore the door direction indicators

The window sills in the nook are exactly the height of our current counter tops. I.e. you wouldn't have to actually change anything about the windows (other than trimming or removing the sills) to put counters in there. You probably should. You just wouldn't have to.

The main thing we want to do is expand the kitchen into that nook, since I think it is completely moronic to have a breakfast nook 6' away from the main dining area, especially when the kitchen is so sub par and could really use that space. Right now we have a little island furniture thing in there and a pot rack so it's helping a little but even if we just put counters and lowers along 2 of the 3 walls it'd more than double our counter and lower cabinets. Just two walls of cabinets and lowers and maybe some open upper shelves in the corners would solve our functional problems completely I think. I don't think we want to try and match our 2006 style maple/granite though and do something more modern. So my second idea is to do a new island and make the island counter/cabinet match the nook counter/cabinet, trying to tie the two spaces together. I'd also make the island twice as deep as it is now, so there's cabinets on both sides.

I think to really do it right we'd get rid of the slider completely and replace it with a window so that we can have lowers on 3 sides, put the pot rack in front of the left/north window (it just looks out at the side of the neighbors house and yard) and reduce the height of the windows by 6" or whatever so that we can have some backsplash behind the counter. But not sure if we want to go that far. All options are on the table and we don't really have a set budget but I kind of feel like the two best options are either "spend a minimal amount just to make it functional" or "go whole hog and gut the whole thing and make a kick rear end kitchen." I kinda feel like trying to do something in the middle is going to end up being expensive while still not getting that great a result, if that makes sense. If we were to do a full remodel I'd feel kind of bad yanking out the cabinets and counters that are in the kitchen currently since they're not that bad, but there's also not that much of them (which is the whole problem) so I wouldn't feel that bad.

The other kinda big issue is that our pantry sucks. We're using the linen closet in the hallway as a second pantry and we also put a lot of kitchen gadgets in the garage and coat closet just because we don't have room in the kitchen. The expansion into the nook might be enough so that the small pantry isn't a big issue but all the wasted space for that hallway just sucks and bothers me. Like I get that it's supposed to create the illusion of privacy for the half bath but it doesn't work and who cares anyway. If someone goes in there and takes a dump you're still only separated from the living room by a 2x4 interior wall so the fact that the door is in a little hallway isn't going to save you.

So the idea would be to just flip the door from one side to the other (the toilet and sink locations permit this, they're not in the way), and make an enormous walk in pantry. Maybe could be a way to incorporate the laundry room and improve it also? It's small also. I've seen some houses with a combo laundry room/pantry but maybe that's not desirable, not sure.

Sooooo, any opinions or advice about any of this would be very welcome.







Queen Victorian
Feb 21, 2018



Hello fellow lovely kitchen haver. Tough starting point, but I think you’re going in the right direction.

My immediate thought would also be to ax the dumb breakfast nook and add it to the greater kitchen space, and then expand the counter down the whole length of the wall.

The other thing I would do is combine the laundry room/passthrough with the pantry and hallway nook thing so you have a double-sized room were you can install a big wall of floor-to-ceiling shelving/cabinets for nonperishable foodstuffs and auxiliary equipment and such. I presume the outside door to the laundry room goes into the garage. If you combine these spaces, you’ll have an easier time unloading groceries because you don’t have to go through and around to a separate pantry. Also eliminates a door or two in the dining area so you have more space for a cool sideboard and a big art or something.

Then you can move the fridge to the other end of the counter next to the laundry room. This gets it out of the way of your new extended length of countertop and brings it closer to your point of entry so it helps make grocery unloading easier. I’m a fan of always putting the fridge at the end of a counter or in its own nook on a separate wall because having your counter interrupted by a fridge is really annoying and causes unnecessary fragmentation of workspace. I guess stove and sink are okay where they are. Does the island have seating or is it standing workspace only? If you redo the island I’d make it workspace only so you eliminate the need for stool kick space and can make it deeper. I’m a personal fan of having a “drink shelf” backing for the island - back part of island is raised and has maybe a 9” deep counter surface on top. These are great for concealing dishes or cluttered stove tops from view from the dining area. Also good height for leaning on so you can be interacting with family/guests while cooking but they’re not actively in your way. I’m doing a stove island and definitely including one of these. Also having island seating literally right next to your dining table is dumb and redundant but I see it all the loving time and I don’t get it.

So a couple side effects of this shuffling is that you put the power room door kind of out in the open and remove the coat closet. One solution to consider would be to add a wall extension or something off the entry so you have a nook where you can put a hall tree or by the powder room entrance.

Lastly, I highly recommend grabbing a quad pad and some tracing paper. I personally find it easier to iterate than dealing with the overhead of using a computer program. Like do one good measured drawing of the kitchen as it is then trace your changes over it. Or print out the CAD version and use the tracing paper on it.

hypnophant
Oct 19, 2012


bird with big dick posted:

kitchen organization

Other ideas:

Move the half-bath door per your suggestion, move the washer/dryer into the nook next to the linen closet, knock down that wall and claim the space for the kitchen

Move the sink (and dishwasher if you have one) into new counters in the breakfast nook to create a "cleaning up zone", use the island for cabinets and a food prep area

It's not clear how much of this you're already doing or what's possible, but find ways to make use of vertical space and cabinet space - pegboards on walls, a hanging pot rack over the island, pull-out pantry shelving

sideboard/bar cart in the dining area to move dishware/cutlery/stemware out of the kitchen, recovering a little more space for gadgets or utensils

actionjackson
Jan 12, 2003

your living room looks like shit

disclaimer: I hate kitchen islands

Can the island easily be removed? I'm guessing no, but if it could that would be awesome, it really interrupts the space.

on your top down pics, can you add some dimensions?

falz
Jan 29, 2005

01100110 01100001 01101100 01111010


bird with big dick posted:

Our kitchen is too small and has insufficient storage and countertop area and the pantry is unlit and small and the island is meh and there's this useless vestigial breakfast nook and stupid half bath hallway and also the laundry room sucks poo poo etc.

This is where id definitely hire a designer to figure some stuff out. If you're ok with ikea cabinets, I used these guys last year and am happy enough. Also not super expensive. See my post history for some docs they created and final ish photos.

https://inspiredkitchendesign.com/

You should definitely have an idea of what you want generally in mind first though. It's $500 for a kitchen design, I think they do closets and such lower prices. Totes reasonable imo.

Edit: is it possible to get sink out to breakfast nook area? Maybe not practical but if it's window ey it may be neato.

falz fucked around with this message at 16:43 on Mar 14, 2021

actionjackson
Jan 12, 2003

your living room looks like shit

speaking of kitchens, I contacted a place that did very modern, "Scandinavian" kitchens, and only did full renos, and they said they've never done one under 20k, but mine could maybe be 15k :/

but the good news is you can just reface and get larger doors and hinges to create a frameless look if you have framed cabinets, and it's wayyyy cheaper

bird with big dick
Oct 21, 2015




actionjackson posted:

disclaimer: I hate kitchen islands

Can the island easily be removed? I'm guessing no, but if it could that would be awesome, it really interrupts the space.

And then do what with that space?

actionjackson
Jan 12, 2003

your living room looks like shit

bird with big dick posted:

And then do what with that space?

well that's why I asked about the dimensions, but that would be a natural area for a dining table with the island gone. and there would be some clear separation between dining and living areas.

do the cabinets above the cooktop, oven, sink etc. not provide enough storage space?

can you just add annotations with dimensions for the image you posted? the one with the red markup

Bloody
Mar 3, 2013



what do you want out of your kitchen? do you cook a lot? bake a lot? entertain? when you cook, what level of complexity are you at? do you have children? (plan to) host fancy dinner parties? when the kitchen is being used, how many people are typically using it at once? what are your priorities?

for our kitchen, the priority was cooking ergonomics for a solo chef, and the layout fully embraces that: parallel counter tops with 3 clear work zones. fridge / sink / stove in an unobstructed equilateral triangle. butcher block counters in 1 zone used as a massive cutting board. it's great to cook in by myself, starts to feel a little crowded when my partner is in the space at the same time, and is basically unusable with anybody else in the space.

bird with big dick
Oct 21, 2015




actionjackson posted:

do the cabinets above the cooktop, oven, sink etc. not provide enough storage space?

bird with big dick posted:

Our kitchen is too small and has insufficient storage and countertop area

bird with big dick
Oct 21, 2015




I like islands because it lets me look at other people in the room or at the television while I'm standing at a counter rather than at a wall (or out a window, though that can be nice also) but regardless we're probably not going to do anything that eliminates any cabinet and countertop space.




Bloody posted:

what do you want out of your kitchen? do you cook a lot? bake a lot? entertain? when you cook, what level of complexity are you at? do you have children? (plan to) host fancy dinner parties? when the kitchen is being used, how many people are typically using it at once? what are your priorities?

for our kitchen, the priority was cooking ergonomics for a solo chef, and the layout fully embraces that: parallel counter tops with 3 clear work zones. fridge / sink / stove in an unobstructed equilateral triangle. butcher block counters in 1 zone used as a massive cutting board. it's great to cook in by myself, starts to feel a little crowded when my partner is in the space at the same time, and is basically unusable with anybody else in the space.

We both cook a lot and bake a lot and have dinner parties, no kids, and I'd say our level of complexity is essentially maximum. There will definitely be two of us in the kitchen pretty regularly. I think the nook becoming kitchen won't ever be ideal just because it'll always feel a little detached from the rest of the kitchen but functionally it'll probably be pretty good because one person can be in there doing prep type stuff and the other can be at the stove and the fridge will be in between the two so both will have unobstructed access to it.

bird with big dick
Oct 21, 2015




Queen Victorian posted:

The other thing I would do is combine the laundry room/passthrough with the pantry and hallway nook thing so you have a double-sized room were you can install a big wall of floor-to-ceiling shelving/cabinets for nonperishable foodstuffs and auxiliary equipment and such. I presume the outside door to the laundry room goes into the garage. If you combine these spaces, you’ll have an easier time unloading groceries because you don’t have to go through and around to a separate pantry. Also eliminates a door or two in the dining area so you have more space for a cool sideboard and a big art or something.

Yeah I had considered this briefly but hadn't really thought about it that much yet but more and more I'm thinking it would be better than leaving them separate. The resulting room would be about 16' x 5'8" and we could add some counter adjacent to the laundry sink which would be good for both laundry and unloading groceries, and of course there'd be tons of room for 12" and 18" depth pantry type shelves.

And yeah, that door goes to the garage.

actionjackson
Jan 12, 2003

your living room looks like shit

what size and shape is the dining table you want to put in?

i agree with the poster above saying that island seating is weird when you have a dining table right next to it

Queen Victorian
Feb 21, 2018



bird with big dick posted:

Yeah I had considered this briefly but hadn't really thought about it that much yet but more and more I'm thinking it would be better than leaving them separate. The resulting room would be about 16' x 5'8" and we could add some counter adjacent to the laundry sink which would be good for both laundry and unloading groceries, and of course there'd be tons of room for 12" and 18" depth pantry type shelves.

And yeah, that door goes to the garage.

12” and 18” depth shelving is exactly what I was thinking, actually. But yeah I went immediately to the larger laundry/pantry combo idea because I was drawn to the cluster of claustrophobic little spaces you currently have and how they don’t really serve you that well because they’re so fragmented, not to mention the cramped dead space that is the powder room hall, which adds a weird thoroughfare right in the middle of the transition between your kitchen and dining area. The thing about turning the hall into the pantry (and leaving the laundry room as is) is that it still puts an extra door in the dining area and prevents you from having uninterrupted wall space for a centered sideboard (which would provide even more additional storage space). Also moving the powder room point of entry away from the dining area and out of the line of sight of the table is a good thing in my opinion (or it could just be me being an oversensitive weirdo - I host(ed) dinner parties a lot and get obsessed with not having anything uncouth like a powder room or dirty pots or unopened mail or whatever in anyone’s line of sight).

Oh, and it turns out I somehow got it in my head that the linen closet was a coat closet. I pointed losing the coat closet as a downside to the laundry/pantry combo, but I guess there’s not actually a coat closet getting lost? With the combined room you could easily carve out a section of shelving for linens and have them conveniently near the washer and dryer instead of through the kitchen and around the corner.

Liquid Communism
Mar 9, 2004


Out here, everything hurts.




actionjackson posted:

disclaimer: I hate kitchen islands

Can the island easily be removed? I'm guessing no, but if it could that would be awesome, it really interrupts the space.

on your top down pics, can you add some dimensions?

I tend to agree. I'd much rather have a 30" x 48" stainless with wood top work table than an island. That way I can move it if I need more space or want to deck scrub the whole kitchen.

bird with big dick
Oct 21, 2015




Queen Victorian posted:

12” and 18” depth shelving is exactly what I was thinking, actually. But yeah I went immediately to the larger laundry/pantry combo idea because I was drawn to the cluster of claustrophobic little spaces you currently have and how they don’t really serve you that well because they’re so fragmented, not to mention the cramped dead space that is the powder room hall, which adds a weird thoroughfare right in the middle of the transition between your kitchen and dining area. The thing about turning the hall into the pantry (and leaving the laundry room as is) is that it still puts an extra door in the dining area and prevents you from having uninterrupted wall space for a centered sideboard (which would provide even more additional storage space). Also moving the powder room point of entry away from the dining area and out of the line of sight of the table is a good thing in my opinion (or it could just be me being an oversensitive weirdo - I host(ed) dinner parties a lot and get obsessed with not having anything uncouth like a powder room or dirty pots or unopened mail or whatever in anyone’s line of sight).

Oh, and it turns out I somehow got it in my head that the linen closet was a coat closet. I pointed losing the coat closet as a downside to the laundry/pantry combo, but I guess there’s not actually a coat closet getting lost? With the combined room you could easily carve out a section of shelving for linens and have them conveniently near the washer and dryer instead of through the kitchen and around the corner.

Yeah, it's linen rather than coat, and we absolutely don't need it because there's some built in upper and lower cabinets right by the guest bathroom and spare bedrooms that make a better linen closet. There's a coat closet but it's not shown, it's around the corner from the front door and accessed off the "hallway to BRs" hall.

I think we basically now have a good idea of what the progression of things should be in order of how much we decide we want to spend, something like:

1. Two walls worth of lower cabinets and counters plus open corner uppers in the nook.
2. 1 plus do the hallway converted into pantry/laundry combo.
3. 1-2 but get rid of the slider and put in a window and put lowers there also.
4. 1-3 plus redo the island so there's cabinets on both sides plus maybe bookshelves or something on the shorter sides.
5. Gut everything and start over.

I'm going to push for either 2 or 5. Wife will probably argue for 1.

Thanks everyone, this has been helpful, will probably try and get ahold of some designers over the next week.

falz
Jan 29, 2005

01100110 01100001 01101100 01111010


Liquid Communism posted:

I tend to agree. I'd much rather have a 30" x 48" stainless with wood top work table than an island. That way I can move it if I need more space or want to deck scrub the whole kitchen.
Isn't this literally just an island, but movable?

Clearly you worked fast food, we had the same poo poo at McDs and KFC back in the day.

Liquid Communism
Mar 9, 2004


Out here, everything hurts.




Fast food, fine dining, and everything between.

Large, central work table has been a standard of kitchen layout throughout history and remains the best thing if you do a lot of cooking (or as I do, a lot of baking).

actionjackson
Jan 12, 2003

your living room looks like shit

a table the size of that island (which looks to be about 3x10 feet) would work pretty well, obviously in the other orientation :p

deoju
Jul 11, 2004

All the pieces matter.


Nap Ghost

I've got this weird corner in my apartment and I don't know what the hell to do with it.

I used to have my desk there, but it just ended up being the place where I threw poo poo I didn't know what to do with. That window faces almost due south, and It's how I get most sunlight in the room so I don't want to block it. My place consists of bedroom, bathroom, kitchen, and this room, so it is where I spend most of my time.
Here's a little map I drew up to help me plan things...

Any tips on what the gently caress to do here would be appreaciated.

bird with big dick
Oct 21, 2015




Put a kitchen island in it.

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wheatpuppy
Apr 25, 2008

YOU HAVE MY POST!

deoju posted:

I've got this weird corner in my apartment and I don't know what the hell to do with it.

I used to have my desk there, but it just ended up being the place where I threw poo poo I didn't know what to do with. That window faces almost due south, and It's how I get most sunlight in the room so I don't want to block it. My place consists of bedroom, bathroom, kitchen, and this room, so it is where I spend most of my time.
Here's a little map I drew up to help me plan things...

Any tips on what the gently caress to do here would be appreaciated.

Maybe line it with bookshelves, throw an ottoman/low chair in the center in case you want to actually sit there while you read?

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