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Franchescanado
Feb 23, 2013

I AM A STUPIDLY SEXY WOLFMAN



Grimey Drawer

"My whole life has been movies and religion. That's it. Nothing else."



Martin Charles Scorsese was born November 17th, 1942 in Queens, New York City. He was raised Catholic, and he grew up in Manhattan's Little Italy, and then, as a teenager, in the Bronx. At 18 years old, he intended to be a priest, but failed seminary after a year. He then pursued a B.A. in English, and then pursued his M.A. at NYU School of the Arts.

He started with short films, which have been recently collected by the Criterion Collection in a convenient single volume. What's A Nice Girl Like You Doing In A Place Like This?, It's Not Just You, Murray! and The Big Shave. In 1967, he made his first feature-length film, Who's That Knocking At My Door. It was shown at the 1967 Chicago International Film Festival. Roger Ebert praised the film, and Scorsese's career in film had officially begun.

As of this post, Scorsese has directed 25 full-length films and 16 full-length documentary films, as well as music videos, short films, and episodes of television. While he is most known for his Mob/Gangster movies, he has worked in Comedy, Horror, Noir, Historical Epics, Bio Pics, Thrillers, Family Films, and Sports films.





“The cinema began with a passionate, physical relationship between celluloid and the artists and craftsmen and technicians who handled it, manipulated it, and came to know it the way a lover comes to know every inch of the body of the beloved. No matter where the cinema goes, we cannot afford to lose sight of its beginnings.”

Scorsese's love for cinema extends beyond the role of director. In 1990, he created The Film Foundation, a non-profit organization with restores prints or old/damaged films. It has restored more than 800 films from around the world. It conducts a free educational curriculum for young people to learn the history of film, and cinematic language.

In 2007, Scorsese established the World Cinema Project, which collects films from regions around the world to preserve them and to make them widely available.

In 2017, Scorsese was a part of a collaborative effort between his Film Foundation, UNESCO, Cineteca di Bologna and the Pan African Federation of Filmmakers, called The African Film Heritage Project, to restore and preserve classic African films and make them widely available.




"Curating isn’t undemocratic or “elitist,” a term that is now used so often that it’s become meaningless. It’s an act of generosity—you’re sharing what you love and what has inspired you."

In the past few years, Scorsese has stoked controversy and discussion across various social media platforms by voicing, in interviews and essays, his concerns for the modern state of Cinema, his greatest passion, and for being dismissive of the current trend of studio blockbusters. Many filmmakers and cinephiles agree with his opinions, while others defend their interest in blockbusters by declaring Scorsese and his fans as elitists. It is an ongoing discussion. Amidst this controversy, his latest film The Irishman, is the fifth most popular Netflix release overall, and was nominated for 10 Academy Awards and 5 Golden Globe awards, for whatever that's worth. Despite infuriating people on social media by critiquing their tastes and watch habits, audiences still love Scorsese.


Scorsese's Filmography

Feature films

1967 | Who's That Knocking at My Door
1972 | Boxcar Bertha
1973 | Mean Streets
1974 | Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore
1976 | Taxi Driver
1977 | New York, New York
1980 | Raging Bull
1982 | The King of Comedy
1985 | After Hours
1986 | The Color of Money
1988 | The Last Temptation of Christ
1989 | New York Stories | Anthology Film | Segment: Life Lessons
1990 | Goodfellas
1991 | Cape Fear
1993 | The Age of Innocence
1995 | Casino
1997 | Kundun
1999 | Bringing Out the Dead
2002 | Gangs of New York
2004 | The Aviator
2006 | The Departed
2010 | Shutter Island
2011 | Hugo
2013 | The Wolf of Wall Street
2016 | Silence
2019 | The Irishman


Documentary films

1966 | New York City... Melting Point
1970 | Street Scenes 1970
1974 | Italianamerican
1978 | The Last Waltz
1978 | American Boy: A Profile of Steven Prince
1995 | A Personal Journey with Martin Scorsese Through American Movies
1999 | My Voyage to Italy
2001 | The Neighborhood | Short film | for The Concert for New York City
2003 | Feel Like Going Home | For the documentary series The Blues
2004 | Lady by the Sea: The Statue of Liberty
2005 | No Direction Home: Bob Dylan
2008 | Shine a Light Yes
2010 | A Letter to Elia
2010 | Public Speaking
2011 | George Harrison: Living in the Material World
2014 | The 50 Year Argument
2019 | Rolling Thunder Revue: A Bob Dylan Story by Martin Scorsese


Short films

1959 | Vesuvius VI
1963 | What's a Nice Girl Like You Doing in a Place Like This?
1964 | It's Not Just You, Murray!
1967 | The Big Shave
1990 | Made in Milan
2007 | The Key to Reserva
2015 | The Audition

As of this post, he is currently in pre-production for Killers of the Flower Moon, an adaptation of the the non-fiction book by David Grann. Scorsese describes it as his first Western. It has a tentative release date of 2022, but there has been issues with funding.




This thread is for discussing Scorsese's films, his techniques for story-telling, his influence as director and film historian, and debating controversies around his opinions.

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Franchescanado
Feb 23, 2013

I AM A STUPIDLY SEXY WOLFMAN



Grimey Drawer

My favorite Scorsese films are After Hours, Cape Fear, Casino and Taxi Driver.

Casino is better than Goodfellas.

Electronico6
Feb 25, 2011



Forgot this short

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qCD3ETFYLr8

Spatulater bro!
Aug 19, 2003

Punch! Punch! Punch!



Scorsese is the greatest working film director. Change my mind

Here's a list of his favorite movies. I love that a big chunk of them are horror. Surprising that he's really only made one horror movie.

Some more random Scorsese related thoughts:
- I very often cite Taxi Driver as my favorite movie of all time. I first saw it when I was 16 and it kinda blew my mind. I've seen it at least 10 times since then and my love for it never fades.
- The Irishman is a masterpiece and his best film since Casino.
- Everyone who hasn't seen Silence needs to loving see Silence.
- The King of Comedy is one of the most underappreciated films I know of.

Magic Hate Ball
May 6, 2007

ha ha ha!
you've already paid for this


New York, New York is a masterpiece imho.

Basebf555
Feb 29, 2008

The greatest sensual pleasure there is is to know the desires of another!



Fun Shoe

Taxi Driver is the one that I come back to again and again, I basically watch it once a year.

Although Scorsese's films have started to get UHD releases in the past few years and some of them are well worth upgrading. Casino in particular looks fantastic. I hope we get a Taxi Driver UHD sometime soon.

Uncle Boogeyman
Jul 22, 2007



alright time for some lukewarm hot takes:

-Silence is probably a fine novel but doesn't really work as a film
-Kundun and Bringing Out the Dead are horribly underrated
-Gangs of New York has a better Daniel Day Lewis performance than There Will Be Blood
-Raging Bull feels weirdly forgotten for some reason considering it's maybe the best movie by Scorsese or De Niro
-I will take anyone making GBS threads on his film takes seriously when they direct a movie at least as good as After Hours and not before

Spatulater bro!
Aug 19, 2003

Punch! Punch! Punch!



Franchescanado posted:

Casino is better than Goodfellas.

There's definitely a case to be made. When I think back to my favorite gangster-related scenes from Scorsese movies, most of them are from Casino.

Karloff
Mar 21, 2013



I don't think there's anyone better at sheer visual pacing, for taking you and pulling you through the story with clear purposeful movement. I always thought The Departed was underrated especially as a study of sociopathy and the function of lying. This is such a minor scene in the film, but to me it says so much about manipulative people https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wGGSvhN8SaY

You can see he's playing her just as well as he's plays everyone else in his life. It's borderline terrifying.

Blood Boils
Dec 27, 2006

Its not an S, on my planet it means QUIPS


Hair Elf

Uncle Boogeyman posted:

alright time for some lukewarm hot takes:

-Silence is probably a fine novel but doesn't really work as a film
-Kundun and Bringing Out the Dead are horribly underrated
-Gangs of New York has a better Daniel Day Lewis performance than There Will Be Blood
-Raging Bull feels weirdly forgotten for some reason considering it's maybe the best movie by Scorsese or De Niro
-I will take anyone making GBS threads on his film takes seriously when they direct a movie at least as good as After Hours and not before

Scary accurate

Franchescanado
Feb 23, 2013

I AM A STUPIDLY SEXY WOLFMAN



Grimey Drawer

Basebf555 posted:

Taxi Driver is the one that I come back to again and again, I basically watch it once a year.

Although Scorsese's films have started to get UHD releases in the past few years and some of them are well worth upgrading. Casino in particular looks fantastic. I hope we get a Taxi Driver UHD sometime soon.

I've never owned Taxi Driver--always rented it or streamed it--and now I'm holding out for a UHD. Grabbed the Casino UHD, but I haven't watched it yet. Hoping I can rope in a friend who's never seen it.

Alfred P. Pseudonym
May 29, 2006

And when you gaze long into an abyss, the abyss goes 8-8



I’ve been working my way through a lot of Scorsese’s stuff that I hadn’t seen previously over the last year or so. I was surprised at how much I liked The Age of Innocence, which seems at first to be outside Marty’s wheelhouse, but it’s a Scorsese movie through and through. Also, the Criterion release of his short films is great. Italianamerican is delightful and American Boy is a hell of a ride.

The Cameo
Jan 20, 2005

I never realized
Life's just a series of lows and highs




Figure this might be a good place to drop off two thirds of A Personal Journey Through American Movies w/ ol’ eyebrows himself, a documentary which is a little harder to get a hold of these days: the DVD is nearly $80 on Amazon (but only $13 for a VHS tape of it!... if you have a VCR) and isn’t streaming anywhere in an official capacity.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cCH-6LKQTPA

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Po1cvUePmf4

I have no idea why the third part never got uploaded, although my assumption is it did but got copyright struck years ago since the last segment of this doc goes into the more recent (at the time) periods of filmmaking (although he also states when it wraps up that he won’t be talking about movies he and his friends have made because that, to him, is just egotism) and caught by the algorithm.

Regardless, these are the films he talks about, just about all of which he mentions as having an influence on him:


--Part I--
The Bad and the Beautiful, 1952, directed by Vincente Minnelli
Duel in the Sun, nicknamed "Lust in the Dust", 1946 Western film directed by King Vidor, William Dieterle and others
The Girl Can't Help It, 1956 Musical film directed by Frank Tashlin
Bigger Than Life, 1956 directed by Nicholas Ray
Vertigo, 1958 psychological thriller film directed by Alfred Hitchcock
The Naked Kiss, 1964 neo-noir film written and directed by Samuel Fuller
Murder by Contract, 1958 film noir directed by Irving Lerner
The Red House, 1947 psychological thriller directed by Delmer Daves
The Phenix City Story, 1955 film noir directed by Phil Karlson
Sullivan's Travels, 1941 comedy film written and directed by Preston Sturges
The Crowd, 1928 silent film directed by King Vidor
The Big Parade, 1925 silent film directed by King Vidor
Shadow of a Doubt, 1943 thriller film directed by Alfred Hitchcock
Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, 1939, directed by Frank Capra
The Great Train Robbery, 1903 Western film written, produced, and directed by Edwin S. Porter
The Musketeers of Pig Alley, 1912, directed by D. W. Griffith
High Sierra, 1941, directed by Raoul Walsh
Colorado Territory, 1949 western film directed by Raoul Walsh (a remake of the 1941 High Sierra)
Stagecoach (1939), 1939 western film directed by John Ford
She Wore a Yellow Ribbon, 1949 western film directed by John Ford
The Searchers, 1956 western film directed by John Ford
The Furies, 1950 American Western film directed by Anthony Mann
The Naked Spur, 1953 American Western film directed by Anthony Mann
The Tall T, 1957 Western film directed by Budd Boetticher
The Left Handed Gun, 1958 American western film and the film directorial debut of Arthur Penn
Unforgiven, 1992 American Western film produced and directed by Clint Eastwood
Chesty: A Tribute to a Legend, 1971 documentary directed by John Ford
The Public Enemy, 1931 American Pre-Code crime film directed by William A. Wellman
The Regeneration, 1915, directed by Raoul Walsh
Scarface (1932), 1932 American gangster film directed by Howard Hawks (and Richard Rosson)
The Roaring Twenties, 1939 crime thriller directed by Raoul Walsh
I Walk Alone, 1948 film noir directed by Byron Haskin.
Force of Evil, 1948 film noir directed by Abraham Polonsky
Point Blank, 1967 American crime film directed by John Boorman
Gold Diggers of 1935, 1935 musical film directed and choreographed by Busby Berkeley
Gold Diggers of 1933, 1933 musical film directed by Mervyn LeRoy, staged and choreographed by Busby Berkeley
42nd Street, 1933 musical film directed by Lloyd Bacon with choreography by Busby Berkeley
Footlight Parade, 1933 musical film directed by Lloyd Bacon with choreography by Busby Berkeley
Meet Me in St. Louis, 1944 musical film directed by Vincente Minnelli
My Dream Is Yours, 1949 musical and comedy film directed by Michael Curtiz
*New York, New York, 1977 musical directed by Martin Scorsese (film mentioned in connection with My Dream Is Yours)
The Band Wagon, 1953 musical film directed by Vincente Minnelli
A Star Is Born (1954), 1954 musical film directed by George Cukor
All That Jazz, 1979 musical film directed by Bob Fosse

--Part II--
The Cameraman, 1928 silent comedy directed by Edward Sedgwick
The Birth of a Nation, 1915 silent film directed by D. W. Griffith
Death's Marathon, 1913 silent film directed by D. W. Griffith
Cabiria, 1914 Italian silent film directed by Giovanni Pastrone
Intolerance, 1916 silent film directed by D. W. Griffith
The Ten Commandments (1923 film), 1923 silent film directed by Cecil B. DeMille
Samson and Delilah (1949), 1949, directed by Cecil B. DeMille
The Ten Commandments (1956 film), 1956, directed by Cecil B. DeMille
Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans, 1927 silent film directed by F. W. Murnau
Seventh Heaven (1927), 1927 silent film directed by Frank Borzage
Anna Christie (1930), 1930, directed by Clarence Brown
Her Man, 1930, directed by Tay Garnett
The Big House (1930), 1930, directed by George W. Hill
Leave Her to Heaven, 1945 film noir directed by John M. Stahl
Johnny Guitar, 1954 Western film directed by Nicholas Ray
The Robe, 1953 Biblical epic film directed by Henry Koster
East of Eden, 1955, directed by Elia Kazan
Some Came Running , 1958, directed by Vincente Minnelli
Land of the Pharaohs, 1955, directed and produced by Howard Hawks
The Fall of the Roman Empire, 1964, directed by Anthony Mann
The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles, American television series from 4 March 1992 to 24 July 1993, created and executively produced by George Lucas, directed by Steven Spielberg
2001: A Space Odyssey, 1968 science fiction film produced and directed by Stanley Kubrick
Cat People, 1942 horror film directed by Jacques Tourneur
I Walked with a Zombie, 1943 horror film directed by Jacques Tourneur
Letter from an Unknown Woman (1948), 1948 film directed by Max Ophüls, based on the novella written by Stefan Zweig
Scarlet Street, 1945 American film noir directed by Fritz Lang
Detour (1945), 1945, directed by Edgar G. Ulmer
Double Indemnity, 1944 film noir directed by Billy Wilder
Crime Wave (1954), 1954 film noir directed by André De Toth
Outrage (1950), 1950, directed by noted film noir actress and pioneering female director Ida Lupino
Gun Crazy, 1950 film noir directed by Joseph H. Lewis
T-Men, 1947 film noir directed by Anthony Mann
Raw Deal (1948), 1948 film noir directed by Anthony Mann
Kiss Me Deadly, 1955 film noir directed by Robert Aldrich

--Part III--
Silver Lode, 1954, directed by Allan Dwan
All That Heaven Allows, 1955, directed by Douglas Sirk
Bigger Than Life, 1956, directed by Nicholas Ray
Forty Guns, 1957 western film directed by Samuel Fuller
Pickup on South Street, 1953 film noir directed by Samuel Fuller
Shock Corridor, 1963, directed by Samuel Fuller
Two Weeks in Another Town, 1962, directed by Vincente Minnelli
Broken Blossoms, 1919 silent film directed by D. W. Griffith
The Wedding March (1928), 1928 silent film directed by Erich von Stroheim
I Am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang, 1932, directed by Mervyn LeRoy
Hell's Highway (1932), 1932, directed by Rowland Brown
Wild Boys of the Road, 1933, directed by William Wellman
Heroes for Sale, 1933, directed by William Wellman
The Scarlet Empress, 1934, directed and produced by Josef von Sternberg
Citizen Kane, 1941, directed by and starring Orson Welles
The Magnificent Ambersons, 1942, directed and written by Orson Welles
A Streetcar Named Desire (1951), 1951, directed by Elia Kazan
On the Waterfront, 1954, directed by Elia Kazan
Apache, 1954, directed by Robert Aldrich
Blackboard Jungle, 1955, directed by Richard Brooks
The Wild One, 1953, Directed by László Benedek
Advise & Consent, 1962, directed by Otto Preminger
Paths of Glory, 1967, directed by Stanley Kubrick
I Want to Live!, 1958 film noir directed by Robert Wise
The Man with the Golden Arm, 1955, directed by Otto Preminger
Sweet Smell of Success, 1957 film noir directed by Alexander Mackendrick
One, Two, Three, 1961 comedy directed by Billy Wilder
Bonnie and Clyde, 1967, directed by Arthur Penn
Lolita (1962), 1962, directed by Stanley Kubrick
Barry Lyndon, 1975, directed by Stanley Kubrick
Faces, 1968, directed by John Cassavetes
America America, 1963, directed by Elia Kazan
The Grapes of Wrath, 1940, directed by John Ford

Tuxedo Catfish
Mar 17, 2007

You've got guts! Come to my village, I'll buy you lunch.


Scorsese is a brilliant filmmaker and the scorn and the spirit of what he's said about modern blockbusters is right on the mark, but categorical distinctions between high and low art are still bullshit and an intellectually lazy way of getting that point across. The commodification of art doesn't instantly screech to a halt just because you have a principled vision; it both directly puts pressure on filmmakers to cave in small and large ways, and also filters what kinds of films get produced in the first place, no matter how strong their creators' sense of integrity may be.

Also The Last Temptation of Christ is the first movie I ever saw in my life. My parents took me to it as an infant because they couldn't find a babysitter. A few decades later I decided to revisit it and I can confidently say it still held up.

Franchescanado
Feb 23, 2013

I AM A STUPIDLY SEXY WOLFMAN



Grimey Drawer

For another Scorsese list:

On a recent episode of The Empire Film Podcast, Edgar Wright and Quintin Tarantino talk about movies for three hours. A large chunk of the segment is about British films, and Edgar Wright shares a list of 50 British Films Martin Scorsese personally recommended to him. You can listen to the episode here.

If you'd like to take a look at the list, here it is conveniently compiled on Letterboxd. (I didn't make this list personally, so maybe politely thank the person that did take the time.)

I've only seen 5 of the 50. The Legend of Hell House, The Asphyx, The Innocents, Dead of Night, and The Devil Rides Out. I'd personally recommend The Legend of Hell House and The Innocents as the two best haunted house movies ever made. All five are worth watching, though, with The Asphyx and The Devil Rides Out being particularly wild.

Spatulater bro!
Aug 19, 2003

Punch! Punch! Punch!



Tuxedo Catfish posted:

but categorical distinctions between high and low art are still bullshit and an intellectually lazy way of getting that point across.

I think he does a pretty good job in the NYT article detailing what, as he sees it, are the key qualitative differences between the two types of films.

Scorsese posted:

Many of the elements that define cinema as I know it are there in Marvel pictures. What’s not there is revelation, mystery or genuine emotional danger. Nothing is at risk. The pictures are made to satisfy a specific set of demands, and they are designed as variations on a finite number of themes.

They are sequels in name but they are remakes in spirit, and everything in them is officially sanctioned because it can’t really be any other way. That’s the nature of modern film franchises: market-researched, audience-tested, vetted, modified, revetted and remodified until they’re ready for consumption.

Another way of putting it would be that they are everything that the films of Paul Thomas Anderson or Claire Denis or Spike Lee or Ari Aster or Kathryn Bigelow or Wes Anderson are not. When I watch a movie by any of those filmmakers, I know I’m going to see something absolutely new and be taken to unexpected and maybe even unnameable areas of experience. My sense of what is possible in telling stories with moving images and sounds is going to be expanded.

Maybe a better way to think of it as a spectrum rather than two categorical buckets, but there's no denying the differences are real and definable.

Uncle Boogeyman
Jul 22, 2007



Franchescanado posted:

For another Scorsese list:

On a recent episode of The Empire Film Podcast, Edgar Wright and Quintin Tarantino talk about movies for three hours. A large chunk of the segment is about British films, and Edgar Wright shares a list of 50 British Films Martin Scorsese personally recommended to him. You can listen to the episode here.

If you'd like to take a look at the list, here it is conveniently compiled on Letterboxd. (I didn't make this list personally, so maybe politely thank the person that did take the time.)

I've only seen 5 of the 50. The Legend of Hell House, The Asphyx, The Innocents, Dead of Night, and The Devil Rides Out. I'd personally recommend The Legend of Hell House and The Innocents as the two best haunted house movies ever made. All five are worth watching, though, with The Asphyx and The Devil Rides Out being particularly wild.

My thoughts on some of the others:

Kind Hearts and Coronets is one of the greatest dark comedies of all time. A man who is ninth in line for Dukehood decides to kill the eight people ahead of him, all of whom are played by Alec Guinness. Perfect movie.

The Flesh and the Fiends is a horror-ish retelling of the Burke and Hare grave robbings, featuring a great Peter Cushing performance plus a super young Donald Pleasance. Awesome.

Burn Witch Burn... kinda stinks, not sure I'm on Scorsese's wavelength on that one.

Plague of the Zombies, Scream of Fear, and Quatermass and the Pit are all top tier Hammer Horror. The first features some of the coolest looking screen zombies ever, the second is a cool Hitchcockian thriller with a very young Christopher Lee, and the third is the grandaddy of all "someone went up into outer space and came back wrong" stories, featuring some very wild special effects. Hugely influential too, everyone from John Carpenter to Steven Spielberg cites that one.

Spatulater bro!
Aug 19, 2003

Punch! Punch! Punch!



gently caress yes Kind Hearts and Coronets is so good.

The Klowner
Apr 20, 2019

I see past the sham that is society, and I'm into some incredibly fucked up shit.

Silence is his masterpiece IMHO.

Mokelumne Trekka
Nov 22, 2015

Soon.


Uncle Boogeyman posted:

alright time for some lukewarm hot takes:

-Silence is probably a fine novel but doesn't really work as a film


Can you elaborate? I saw Silence a few years ago (so my memory is hazy) but I really liked it, particularly the pretty images and philosophical discussions.

Cacator
Aug 6, 2005

You're quite good at turning me on.



The Klowner posted:

Silence is his masterpiece IMHO.

I rewatched it recently and was as engaged as the first time I saw the film in the theatre. I don't know why it's not more highly regarded other than the setting or themes being very not accessible to mainstream audiences and it never felt slow to me. Issey Ogata as the Inquisitor is an all time great Scorsese performance. Mark Kermode mentions him "deflating" in a scene and it's a spot on description of whatever it is he's doing.
But the Irishman was better

Uncle Boogeyman
Jul 22, 2007



Mokelumne Trekka posted:

Can you elaborate? I saw Silence a few years ago (so my memory is hazy) but I really liked it, particularly the pretty images and philosophical discussions.

For me, the philosophical discussions just didn't play all that well on film, due to a lot of them being conveyed through kind of dull voiceover plus the fact that I felt like basically every non-Japanese person in the film was woefully miscast (Andrew Garfield has gotta be one of the most consistently miscast good actors in Hollywood) and none of them could handle the Portuguese accents.

There's some theological meat on the bones of the premise for sure, and I could see it working very well in a novel, where you're really occupying the headspace of the protagonist as he tries to work his way through the tangled web of his own faith. But I don't think the film really did a good job of selling the central conflict of "will this Jesuit apostatize to save others from grueling torture," not without the viewer coming to the film with a preexisting religious buy-in - compare this to Kundun or The Last Temptation of Christ, both of which I feel do a fantastic job of putting the viewer in the mind of their protagonists regardless of if you come into it with any background knowledge or strong opinions of the figures depicted.

I can definitely see why the novel grabbed Scorsese, but I felt like something was lost in the translation between mediums. I would like to read the novel some day to see if I'm right.

The Klowner
Apr 20, 2019

I see past the sham that is society, and I'm into some incredibly fucked up shit.

Has Scorsese ever made an out-and-out bad film? I haven't seen all of his filmography but everything I have seen ranges from "masterful" to "decent." Anyone who answers with Gangs of New York deserves a thread ban tbh.

Uncle Boogeyman
Jul 22, 2007



The Klowner posted:

Has Scorsese ever made an out-and-out bad film? I haven't seen all of his filmography but everything I have seen ranges from "masterful" to "decent." Anyone who answers with Gangs of New York deserves a thread ban tbh.

I'll never know because I refuse to watch Hugo.

real answer: I don't know if he's made any outright bad ones, but he's made more than a few that I would qualify as middling - Cape Fear, Silence, Shutter Island, Gangs of New York, and - maybe my hottest take so far - The Wolf of Wall Street.

The Klowner
Apr 20, 2019

I see past the sham that is society, and I'm into some incredibly fucked up shit.

Uncle Boogeyman posted:

middling - Cape Fear, Silence, Shutter Island, Gangs of New York, and - maybe my hottest take so far - The Wolf of Wall Street.

what the gently caress am I reading????

Wooper
Oct 16, 2006

Champion draGoon horse slayer. Making Lancers weep for their horsies since 2011. Viva Dickbutt.


I wanted to be the first one to mention The Age of Innocence, but I wasn't. Anyway, I like that movie a lot.

Franchescanado
Feb 23, 2013

I AM A STUPIDLY SEXY WOLFMAN



Grimey Drawer

I really love Scorsese's Cape Fear. It's a top 5 De Niro performance, a top 5 Nolte performance, a stand-out Lange performance, an impressive performance by Juliette Lewis, and probably my favorite utilization of Joe Don Baker.

Like, I can totally understand why it could be called a middling Scorsese, but it's still one of my favorites, and I get really excited when I can recommend it or show it to someone.

Uncle Boogeyman
Jul 22, 2007



The Klowner posted:

what the gently caress am I reading????

Hard truths.

The man is quite possibly the greatest director of motion pictures to ever live, but it does him no favors to pretend he hit it out of the park every time.

I’d say The Irishman has a fair amount of flaws too but it makes up for them by getting absolutely miraculous performances out of Pacino and Pesci.

Cacator
Aug 6, 2005

You're quite good at turning me on.



But The Wolf of Wall Street was the best comedy of 2013.

CelticPredator
Oct 11, 2013



Franchescanado posted:

I really love Scorsese's Cape Fear. It's a top 5 De Niro performance, a top 5 Nolte performance, a stand-out Lange performance, an impressive performance by Juliette Lewis, and probably my favorite utilization of Joe Don Baker.

Like, I can totally understand why it could be called a middling Scorsese, but it's still one of my favorites, and I get really excited when I can recommend it or show it to someone.

It’s so stylish too. I love the end where the camera just starts going apeshit. It’s not “realistic” but it’s very stylistically in the moment. It’s fantastic

Uncle Boogeyman
Jul 22, 2007



Cacator posted:

But The Wolf of Wall Street was the best comedy of 2013.

Probably technically correct depending on how you feel about Inside Llewyn Davis but no comedy can sustain a three hour running time.

Almost Blue
Apr 18, 2018


Cape Fear isn't one of my favorite Scorsese, but it's pretty good. Weirdly feels more like a De Palma movie to me, I guess because of all the split-diopters and some Hitchcock homages.

Franchescanado
Feb 23, 2013

I AM A STUPIDLY SEXY WOLFMAN



Grimey Drawer

I just really appreciate how muddy every character's "morality" is in Cape Fear. They never "deserve" what happens, but they also aren't "innocent". They gently caress up. They lie or withhold information from each other, which hurts them even more. Cadey abides the law as well as God's law, but for complete cruelty. I love Cadey speaking in tongues at the end, because you never really get to know if he's truly experiencing religious ecstasy or has finally gone completely mad, or a mix of both. It's a really fascinating way to approach a story that would already be interesting if there was a clear dichotomy of Good/Evil on display.

Almost Blue posted:

Cape Fear isn't one of my favorite Scorsese, but it's pretty good. Weirdly feels more like a De Palma movie to me, I guess because of all the split-diopters and some Hitchcock homages.

I hadn't really thought of that, but you're right. It does have a De Palma vibe.

Spatulater bro!
Aug 19, 2003

Punch! Punch! Punch!



The only Scorsese movie I've felt "meh" about is The Color of Money. Everything else has been at worst great.

Franchescanado
Feb 23, 2013

I AM A STUPIDLY SEXY WOLFMAN



Grimey Drawer

I noticed today that After Hours is streaming on HBO MAX. It's only on DVD, so if you've never seen it, I highly recommend it. Great movie for so many reasons. It's an outlier in Scorsese's filmography.

I learned recently that it was originally going to be Tim Burton's first movie, before Scorsese took it away from him.

Uncle Boogeyman
Jul 22, 2007



Franchescanado posted:

I learned recently that it was originally going to be Tim Burton's first movie, before Scorsese took it away from him.

oh thank god

Coaaab
Aug 6, 2006

Wish I was there...


Cacator posted:

Issey Ogata as the Inquisitor is an all time great Scorsese performance. Mark Kermode mentions him "deflating" in a scene and it's a spot on description of whatever it is he's doing.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KX6EF0zGC84

Alfred P. Pseudonym
May 29, 2006

And when you gaze long into an abyss, the abyss goes 8-8



Spatulater bro! posted:

The only Scorsese movie I've felt "meh" about is The Color of Money. Everything else has been at worst great.

Boxcar Bertha is the weakest of his that I’ve seen but he was making that for Roger Corman so I get it. Weakest “established” Scorsese for me is probably Bringing Out the Dead, though I should probably give it another chance at some point.

Spatulater bro!
Aug 19, 2003

Punch! Punch! Punch!



Alfred P. Pseudonym posted:

Boxcar Bertha is the weakest of his that I’ve seen but he was making that for Roger Corman so I get it. Weakest “established” Scorsese for me is probably Bringing Out the Dead, though I should probably give it another chance at some point.

I might have said this too until a few weeks ago when I rewatched it. Now I can confidently say it's a freakin great movie.

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TrixRabbi
Aug 20, 2010

Time for a little robot chauvinism!



Boxcar Bertha is fun! The weakest for me is Gangs of New York, which I've actually not finished cause I fell asleep while watching and never completed it.

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