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Delta-Wye
Sep 29, 2005

Represent!

humans have been playing with early rockets forever, but it wasn't until ww2 that modern rocketry took off. now we have vtol rockets, we've got reusable rockets; rockets that are equally useful for the glory of either manned spaceflight OR ending humanity! they are the firebreathing flying dragons of yore, brought to life. i think they're amazing machines that are also figurative and literal embodiments of national-level dickmeasuring contests, so lets see some rocketpics!

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Delta-Wye
Sep 29, 2005

Represent!



i love the pgm11, look at this beautiful example of a redstone-mercury rocket. so awesome we had to paint 'UNITED STATES' on it twice its basically a nazi v2 under the hood

Do Not Fear Jazz
Feb 1, 2005

W-WHAT DO YOU MEAN YOU DON'T LIKE MY POST?



Delta-Wye
Sep 29, 2005

Represent!

that rockets making me hungry. here is another relic of our cold war past the real relic being the fremont neighborhood itself lmao

Bloody
Mar 3, 2013



Space shuttle

Bloody
Mar 3, 2013



Comedy options: shuttle centaur, delta 4 heavy

Do Not Fear Jazz
Feb 1, 2005

W-WHAT DO YOU MEAN YOU DON'T LIKE MY POST?



Bloody posted:

Space shuttle

Not a rocket but the modified 747 that carried the space shuttles around were cool

Powered Descent
Jul 13, 2008

We haven't had that spirit here since 1969.



The DC-X was ahead of its time.



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McDonnell_Douglas_DC-X

fondue
Jul 14, 2002



I'm partial to Tintin

mediaphage
Mar 22, 2007

Excuse me, pardon me, sheer perfection coming through


Bloody
Mar 3, 2013



I worked with a lot of dcx vets

Base Emitter
Apr 1, 2012

?


Delta-Wye posted:



i love the pgm11, look at this beautiful example of a redstone-mercury rocket. so awesome we had to paint 'UNITED STATES' on it twice its basically a nazi v2 under the hood

You stand next to this thing and you really get a sense of the enormous balls it took to be an early astronaut. Sure the Saturn V is impressive, but the Redstone is so goddamned small you realize its just a missile with a dude instead of a warhead.

StoryTime
Feb 26, 2010

Now listen to me children and I'll tell you of the legend of the Ninja



Technically a turbojet, but still pretty cool.

Delta-Wye
Sep 29, 2005

Represent!

Base Emitter posted:

You stand next to this thing and you really get a sense of the enormous balls it took to be an early astronaut. Sure the Saturn V is impressive, but the Redstone is so goddamned small you realize its just a missile with a dude instead of a warhead.

https://i.imgur.com/CaXSu6e.mp4

early astronauts were all(?) hotshot test pilots before they joined the space program - it could very well be that riding a stick, farting fire, into space was probably safer than what they were used to testing

Kazinsal
Dec 13, 2011






Ornamental Dingbat
Feb 26, 2007



I've always loved how Mercury-Redstone 1 unfolded. It was like a Vaudeville act:


wikipedia posted:

The rocket only rose about 4 inches (10 cm) before settling back onto the pad. Alarms were immediately sounded at LC-5, but the Redstone didn't explode. Instead it merely sat in place, after which a strange sequence of events happened.[4][6][8]

Immediately after the Redstone's engine shut down, the Mercury capsule's escape rocket jettisoned itself, leaving the capsule attached to the Redstone booster. The escape rocket rose to an altitude of 4,000 feet (1,200 m) and landed about 400 yards (370 m) away. Three seconds after the escape rocket fired, the capsule deployed its drogue parachute; it then deployed the main and reserve parachutes, ejecting the radio antenna fairing in the process.[4][6][8]

In the end, all that had been launched was the escape rocket. However, the fully fueled and powered-up Redstone was now sitting on LC-5 with nothing securing it to the pad.




aniviron
Sep 11, 2014



The Soviet N1 is cool as heck. It never had a successful launch as far as I know, but it was more powerful than the Saturn V, this thing was gigantic.



The Sea Dragon was a cool idea too, but that never got past the planning stages. Fun to read about though: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sea_Dragon_(rocket)

Horsebanger
Jun 25, 2009

Steering wheel! Hey! Steering wheel! Someone tell him to give it to me!




aniviron posted:

The Soviet N1 is cool as heck. It never had a successful launch as far as I know, but it was more powerful than the Saturn V, this thing was gigantic.




Doesn't this thing hold the record for largest non-nuclear explosion?

But hell yeah it looks rad its a shame its 33 engines just broke every time and doomed it.

Bloody
Mar 3, 2013



Pogo oscillation is a bitch and Saturn v just got lucky that it didn't get wrecked by pogo

zakharov
Nov 30, 2002

Tater Love


The Saturn V was one of the coolest machines ever built and it's a shame it was designed by a Nazi.

The Moon Monster
Dec 30, 2005
THIS CUSTOM TITLE WILL COME IN HANDY WHILE LURKING


Fun fact: Soyuz rockets are delivered to the launchpad by train and then tilted upright. Locals will put coins on the track leading to the launch pad to get them flattened for good luck.

Lawman 0
Aug 17, 2010





The Moon Monster posted:

Fun fact: Soyuz rockets are delivered to the launchpad by train and then tilted upright. Locals will put coins on the track leading to the launch pad to get them flattened for good luck.



Don't Cosmonauts also take a piss on the track for good luck?

zakharov
Nov 30, 2002

Tater Love


Lawman 0 posted:

Don't Cosmonauts also take a piss on the track for good luck?

They pee on the tire of their van to the launchpad, because Gagarin did it so everyone else has to. Female astronauts/cosmonauts have to get creative.

Bloodfart McCoy
Jul 20, 2007

"The A+ TCC poster
you did nazi coming."





i think of demons
Mar 28, 2020


Mysore/Tipu Sultan rocketry developments are pretty interesting: metal casing, clay refractory boundary to help maintain integrity, mass production, a bamboo lance to help lacerate the poo poo out of horses, the list goes on

also this image is fairly wild:

i think of demons fucked around with this message at 15:19 on Feb 23, 2021

Lawman 0
Aug 17, 2010





i think of demons posted:

Mysore/Tipu Sultan rocketry developments are pretty interesting: metal casing, clay refractory boundary to help maintain integrity, mass production, a bamboo lance to help lacerate the poo poo out of horses, the list goes on

also this image is fairly wild:


Yeah learning about Mysore was pretty wild because they were importing a large amount of European experts to build like observatories and stuff. So there was a decent chance they could have made a bunch of interesting discoveries but oh well.

Nobody Interesting
Mar 29, 2013

Stay frosty, America.


Bloody posted:

Space shuttle

Buran

ExecuDork
Feb 25, 2007

We might be fucked, sir.

Fallen Rib



The Douglas AIR-2A Genie nuclear-warhead-equiped air-to-air missile.


I love that they came up with a plan to launch this thing at low altitude and have the pilot possibly survive (but nobody else, I guess).

i think of demons
Mar 28, 2020


ExecuDork posted:



The Douglas AIR-2A Genie nuclear-warhead-equiped air-to-air missile.


I love that they came up with a plan to launch this thing at low altitude and have the pilot possibly survive (but nobody else, I guess).
"A group of five USAF officers volunteered to stand hatless in their light summer uniforms underneath the blast to prove that the weapon was safe for use over populated area"

Folks, they were hatless (hatless!) and they came in to work the next day. Case closed.

Bloody
Mar 3, 2013



okay. actually. this is my favorite rocket
https://twitter.com/torybruno/status/1361760041301200897?s=20
because my engine is on the bottom 😍

Hyperlynx
Sep 13, 2015



zakharov posted:

The Saturn V was one of the coolest machines ever built and it's a shame it was designed by a Nazi.

*chuckle* Nazi Schmazi!

aniviron
Sep 11, 2014



Bloody posted:

okay. actually. this is my favorite rocket
https://twitter.com/torybruno/status/1361760041301200897?s=20
because my engine is on the bottom 😍

That IS cool.

Mr. Peepers
Mar 11, 2005

Well, I'm a ghost. I scare people. It's all very important, I assure you.




ExecuDork posted:


I love that they came up with a plan to launch this thing at low altitude and have the pilot possibly survive (but nobody else, I guess).

I love that the flightplan they went to the trouble of making a whole diagram for is "turn the gently caress around dingus".

LostCosmonaut
Feb 15, 2014



ExecuDork posted:



The Douglas AIR-2A Genie nuclear-warhead-equiped air-to-air missile.


I love that they came up with a plan to launch this thing at low altitude and have the pilot possibly survive (but nobody else, I guess).

Even more insane ideas were considered at one point; http://www.astronautix.com/h/hibex.html

quote:

HIBEX was designed for low level intercept of entry vehicles below 3 km altitude within 2 seconds of launch. Hibex' neutron-generating warhead would disable the fissile core of the incoming enemy re-entry vehicle. It would also kill all living things within a 5 km radius of detonation.

That later evolved into Sprint, which got as far as testing. It was launched with an explosive driven piston, and accelerated fast enough that it glowed from aerodynamic heating.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=msXtgTVMcuA

Phanatic
Mar 13, 2007

Please don't forget that I am an extremely racist idiot who also has terrible opinions about the Culture series.


My favorite rocket is Orion, no question.

Not the new bullshit one they're calling Orion, but the original one conceived by atomic bomb genius Ted Taylor and Freeman Dyson in the 1950s. The project schedule never progressed beyond scale-models, but they were talking about a manned mission to the moons of Saturn by 1970, and I am convinced that they would absolutely have pulled it off.

The concept is simple as hell. Take one big metal plate. Put what you want to send to space on top of your big metal plate. Set nuclear bombs off under your big metal plate.

Generally the issue with rockets is that they are capable of high thrust, or high specific impulse (basically you can think of this like an exhaust velocity, the faster your propellant shoots out the back the better). Chemical rockets can provide a lot of thrust, but since they can only get as hot as the melting point of the engine components, their exhaust velocities are comparatively pathetic. Stuff like ion engines or plasma thrusters have very high exhaust velocities, but their thrusts are pathetic. If you want high thrust *and* high specific impulse, you need nuclear power, and Orion is a simple as gently caress way to do it. And it scales like mad: if you build a really big one then you can use really efficient hydrogen bombs, and there's no upper limit on the size of hydrogen bombs.

It's a bit more complicated than that, but not much. You have a shock absorber array to smooth out the acceleration (which would have been a modest 2-4 G), and you can spray some oil out on the bottom of your big metal plate to prevent it from ablating, and of course you're setting bombs off in the atmosphere. But remember, this poo poo was the 1950s and 60s, we were doing that all the time anyway. The Soviets set off a 50 megaton monster just to show they could. We set one bomb off that generated a truly massive amount of fallout specifically to explore the question "How big a hole can we dig with an atomic bomb?" (The answer was "a crater 400 meters in diameter and 100 meters deep). This thing could have soft-landed an entire base on the moon the mass of a naval destroyer in a single launch, and you'd only need to set off 100 kilotons of bombs in the atmosphere. The bombs you'd be setting off at sea level would be sub-kiloton: launch it from a floating platform in the middle of the South Atlantic or something, nobody'd even loving notice. Or more seriously, build one in orbit, load it full of bombs, and launch it from there.

Project Orion: hard numbers by Xeni Jardin, on Flickr

As I mentioned, this progressed to the scale model stage before the atomic test ban treaty that forbade setting off nuclear bombs in space came down (and it suffered from the same thing that the post-Apollo space program plans suffered from: too ambitious).

Anyway, here's one of the scale models, using little balls of C4 instead of nuclear bombs:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q8Sv5y6iHUM


Failing that, I'll go with Sea Dragon, which also never existed. It would have dwarfed the Saturn V, and been so big it would have been launched from the ocean. Not from a *platform* in the ocean, it'd float. Fill the fuel tank with kerosene, tow it out to see, fill the oxidizer tank with liquid oxygen generated from seawater via electrolysis powered by a handy nuclear aircraft carrier, and launch it. The TV series For All Mankind has a good visualization:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SRMDcC0QvFQ

Bloody
Mar 3, 2013



LostCosmonaut posted:

Even more insane ideas were considered at one point; http://www.astronautix.com/h/hibex.html


That later evolved into Sprint, which got as far as testing. It was launched with an explosive driven piston, and accelerated fast enough that it glowed from aerodynamic heating.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=msXtgTVMcuA

You know it's the good poo poo when the slow mo looks fast

Elukka
Feb 17, 2011



I did an animation of Orion, and it's really interesting how it moves. It's also fast as hell. This is based directly on the graphs from the big Orion document by General Atomics. I haven't seen it done this way elsewhere.



Video with slow motion:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k2ZbIMUGUPw

The bomb (not shown, I ought to make a more finished version) pops when the pushers are at their furthest extension. The airbags do multiple oscillations per pulse.

Lawman 0
Aug 17, 2010





Phanatic posted:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q8Sv5y6iHUM


Failing that, I'll go with Sea Dragon, which also never existed. It would have dwarfed the Saturn V, and been so big it would have been launched from the ocean. Not from a *platform* in the ocean, it'd float. Fill the fuel tank with kerosene, tow it out to see, fill the oxidizer tank with liquid oxygen generated from seawater via electrolysis powered by a handy nuclear aircraft carrier, and launch it. The TV series For All Mankind has a good visualization:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SRMDcC0QvFQ

Yeah Sea Dragon is some really mind bending stuff.

Blackhawk
Nov 15, 2004



The electron



Mostly because I helped build it, also because it's the first entirely carbon-composite rocket to fly to orbit and the first with 3D printed engines. Also because it's so tiny, I've personally picked up and carried one of the engines myself and pushed the entire rocket (unloaded of course) on some wheeled trolleys between the hanger and launch pad.

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Delta-Wye
Sep 29, 2005

Represent!

that's pretty rad for a small-scale project! rocketry is amazingly accessible these days imho.

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