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Jeffrey of YOSPOS
Dec 22, 2005

GET LOSE, YOU CAN'T COMPARE WITH MY POWERS


I love programming puzzle games and know about a bunch of them.

FYI It's "Opus Magnum", not Magnum Opus. I would add "Infinifactory" under spatial - that would complete the list of commercial ones from Zachtronics. (His free ones are good too!)

As far as ones from other people, I really liked Silicon Zeroes (programming style, by goon PleasingFungus). It is about placing and connecting simple hardware blocks to build more complex hardware blocks, more than writing code ala Shenzen IO, but it still feels closer to programming style. You basically end up building various CPUs over the course of the game out of simple blocks.

OCTOPTICOM is another good one under spatial manipulation. It involves manipulating beams of colored light to produce various output images. I think the steam preview image is pretty illustrative:

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Jeffrey of YOSPOS
Dec 22, 2005

GET LOSE, YOU CAN'T COMPARE WITH MY POWERS


dirby posted:

Thanks for sharing this! For those looking for it, the game is "OCTOPTICOM" with a "t" after the "p". I'm a bit reminded of the old Chromatron, which it seems was far from the first game with colored lasers, according to the article Reflections on a Design.
Wow sorry for this typo - that's bad! I fixed it in my post.

I bought Tametsi and.....yeah that sure is hard-mode hexcells/minesweeper.

Jeffrey of YOSPOS
Dec 22, 2005

GET LOSE, YOU CAN'T COMPARE WITH MY POWERS


Two Owls posted:

Turns out Pushover got a Steam re-release. The... the DOS version's music didn't sound like that originally, right?
Holy crap what a throwback. Played this with my mom in kindergarten. We got stuck on a few levels but were able to see the ending because her zip code growing up was the code to one of the last ones....lol.

Jeffrey of YOSPOS
Dec 22, 2005

GET LOSE, YOU CAN'T COMPARE WITH MY POWERS


I did really like Euclidea - it's the puzzle game about doing geometric constructions you never asked for. I have no idea how to describe that in a way that sounds anything but hopelessly nerdy, but basically, you get very simple tools and use them to find construct something - a simple example is "given two points, find their midpoint". The game asks you to do these in as few moves as possible. It's mind-bendingly hard to get the top scores, requires real out-of-the-box thinking, and is just way more fun than a game about doing tenth grade geometry homework should be. You'll end up learning things about math but it's extremely gamified to the point that you could play it without any context and still have fun imo.

It's on iOS/Android or the web at https://www.euclidea.xyz/. There's a free demo that, afaik, is the full game, it just forces you to get the top answer before proceeding, which is quite harsh.

Jeffrey of YOSPOS
Dec 22, 2005

GET LOSE, YOU CAN'T COMPARE WITH MY POWERS


StrixNebulosa posted:

I too crumbled before the Great Tower and haven't been back since. Great game until that point.
This but I saw it and didn't open the game again. Always intended to go back and attempt it but yikes.

Jeffrey of YOSPOS
Dec 22, 2005

GET LOSE, YOU CAN'T COMPARE WITH MY POWERS


Oldstench posted:

Holy poo poo this is both a great puzzler and hard as balls (especially for people like me who didn't pay attention in geometry class). The web version is complete and allows you to pass to the next level by just succeeding. You don't need to get to top score (which I'm convinced is impossible for some of them.)
I did pay attention in math and it's still hard as poo poo - they certainly didn't exactly focus on "minimum number of operations" in class.

I believe the way it works is, if you don't have the paid version, you must get at least 3*(number of levels) stars in a chapter to move on to the next chapter. So you can have a buffer if you get the special 4th star on a few levels, but you really gotta get those best scores. By the end just completing them is hard. If you pay, you just have to solve each level in any number of moves to move to the next chapter.

Jeffrey of YOSPOS
Dec 22, 2005

GET LOSE, YOU CAN'T COMPARE WITH MY POWERS


dirby posted:

I really liked Hexcells and its sequels, but there were often chains of boring/easy steps you have to click through. I found that to be the case even more so with Hexceed (though I'm not too far into it). A game in the same sort of style that doesn't have that problem and has tons of pretty and expertly hand-crafted levels is Tametsi. Note: Tametsi is not easy, so you should probably have some prior experience with something that builds upon the Minesweeper idea (e.g. Hexcells sequels or Hexceed or Globesweeper or Hexologic or Patterna etc.)

It does some unique things, and I'm glad I experienced it, but I don't think it's well designed as a puzzle game or a narrative game. It's more like a bunch of disconnected weird puzzle-esque experiences that seem to be mimicking Portal in some ways, but without building upon any one mechanic significantly, nor the strength of narrative or humor of something like the Portal games.
I've been playing Tametsi and I'm stuck. Screenshot below with colored dots showing where bombs are in possible solutions. Ignore the fact that the tile with the orange arrow pointing at it is revealed - I clicked it accidentally. I'm playing by my own rule that every square must be uncovered by proving it correct, no guessing, and I don't want to make use of that accidental information. It seems to me like I'm in a situation where there are no available moves that I can prove are correct, and multiple valid solutions exist. Every uncovered square could be a bomb, and none of them are required to be. Anyone see something I'm missing?

Jeffrey of YOSPOS
Dec 22, 2005

GET LOSE, YOU CAN'T COMPARE WITH MY POWERS


cave emperor posted:

Hint: Look at the number of remaining mines

Explanation: One of the four remaining mines has to be in one of the two bottom-left squares, and another one has to be in one of the two top-right squares. This means that the remaining two mines must be in the three left-top squares (the one marked with the orange arrow and the two above it). This satisfies the 2 to the right of this three-square column, so the square immediately above this 2 has to be empty.
I think you missed the blank square at the top of the puzzle - indeed, this would be a solid puzzle if that one weren't there. It's presence creates the ambiguity, allowing for solutions with only 3 mines in that whole bottom right section. I am pretty sure all 4 of my sets of dots provide a valid solution with 4 mines given the current constraints.

Jeffrey of YOSPOS
Dec 22, 2005

GET LOSE, YOU CAN'T COMPARE WITH MY POWERS


TheOneAndOnlyT posted:

That blank square below the top right green-purple square is a 0. Opening it should have revealed that green-purple square automatically, I'm not sure why it didn't.
ohhhhhhhhh! Cool. I might have had that one erroneously marked as a bomb and backed out. Thank you!

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Jeffrey of YOSPOS
Dec 22, 2005

GET LOSE, YOU CAN'T COMPARE WITH MY POWERS


cave emperor posted:

You do you, but I can't imagine living without them, and I don't consider using them cheating in any way. The deductions needed for some of the later puzzles get so complicated that trying to do them in my head would be a complete nightmare.
Having played more of this, I might go further and say that developing an effective system for how and when to use the writing tools is part of the game. Not only have they proven essential but it's not always obvious when they will help, and it's a real challenge to use them in some cases without blowing up your possibility space.

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