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The Deleter
May 22, 2010



View the old thread here

The official site - most of your questions can be answered here!

What is Age of Sigmar?
Age of Sigmar is a tabletop wargame by Games Workshop, set in a Planescape-esque setting where the forces of Good, Evil and In Between clash endlessly for various reasons. After brutally murdering the orignal Warhammer Fantasy Battles back in 2015, various changes in the guard and some people giving a poo poo have turned the original "anonymous musclemen punching each other" setting to "kinda fleshed out setting with known cities, cultures and weird cartoon logic" and the addition of some pretty cool models and factions.

Age of Sigmar's Third Edition is almost upon us, promising big changes to the game to shake things up. It might be a good time to get in when the new edition drops.

What's with all the tiny plastic people?
Age of Sigmar is sold as a "hobby", in that it's a series of plastic models that you build, paint and then make fight in combat. This means that there are three different aspects to the game - building and converting models into cool poses, painting them up, and then going into combat. Some people will prioritise one over the other - some can't stand painting but love the game, whilst others will love to play but dislike building. And that's all fine! Thankfully, Games Workshop has thrown a lot of weight behind making sure all aspects are accessible - you don't need to paint to an insane standard to make models look decent, and you don't need an enormous collection to have a good time playing. Just pick whoever you like the look of and then go for it!

Why should I play this game?
If you want some of the game's selling points:
  • All of the rules - core rules for playing and individual model rules - are free to download, including legacy rules for all Warhammer Fantasy Battle armies (which suck, unfortunately).
  • All of a unit's special rules are spelt out on the sheet. No having to cross reference central rules all the time!
  • Keyword system allows for loose army building and interactions between certain units, including some units that soft-counter other unit types.
  • Buckets of dice.
  • Tons of people play this, for whatever reason.
What's promised for 3.0?
A hell of a lot! Here's a summary;
  • Rulebook is reformatted to be clearer and more concise, akin to Warhammer 40,000's 9th Edition rulebook.
  • Smaller board sizes, matching 40k 9E's board sizes.
  • New reactive command abilities can be used when it isn't your turn, reducing downtime and allowing you to disrupt opponents.
  • More command points earned for going second, and changes to how command abilities work making buff heroes less of a requirement.
  • The addition of Heroic Actions - every player picks a hero at the start of the hero phase to generate a command point, gain buffs, heal or attempt to dispel a spell.
  • Monsters gaining the ability to do Monstrous Rampages in the Charge phase, dealing additional damage, destroying terrain or dueling other monsters.
  • Prayers have been reformatted to work like magic. Priests gain two generic Prayers, equivalent to the generic magic abilities wizards have. Priests can now attempt to dispel other prayers.
  • Predatory Endless Spells move at the end of every hero phase. Additionally, they are now Controlled by the model who cast them - unless they are killed or the spell moves more than 30" away, at which point the spell is under anyone's control...
  • "Endless prayers" are now fully integrated into the rules as Invocations, behaving similarly to Endless Spells.
  • Path to Glory has been reworked to match 40K's Crusade system, allowing you to develop a narrative arc for your army.
  • Warscroll Battalions are gone, replaced with Core Battalions that reward you for building your army in certain ways.
  • Maximum unit sizes are gone - instead, you can double or triple the minimum size of a unit a limited number of times. Many units are having their minimum unit sizes adjusted to compensate for this.

Okay, how do I get started?
Step one is the rules. Age of Sigmar's V3.0 rules can be found here!

Technically, all you need from that point on are the models and their warscrolls, but if you want to play for real, there's a bunch of things you'll want.


The easiest way to get models is the starter sets. The starter sets for Third Edition feature the Stormcast Eternals and the Kruleboyz, and come in three levels:
  • Warrior, featuring a Battleline and a Hero for each side with the core rules, warscroll cards, small playmat, dice and floppy rulers!
  • Harbinger, featuring the same as above but with a different hero choice, an additional unit (Praetor bodyguards for Stormcast, and Hobgrots for Kruleboyz) and a bigger mat.
  • Extremis, containing the contents of Harbinger but replacing the mat with a full fold-out gameboard and plastic scenery.

The previous starter sets - Soul Wars, Storm Strike and Tempest of Souls are likely still available on the shelves of your friendly local game store if you fancy ghosts and different Stormcast.


Alternatively, you might want to look at a Start Collecting set for the faction you like the most. These offer a set of minis at a decent discount, which is pretty rare in the land of Game Workshop, and are a good starting point for most armies.


You will want glue and paints and tools. This is because models come on sprues and need to be cut off, assembled with glue and painted. (This is meant to be a hobby, after all.) Whilst Games Workshop offers a simple-to-follow paint system and a full range of tools to get your models looking the best, be aware that there's a heavy mark-up on these things and there are other alternatives. Ask around at your local hobby group, or in this thread, for recommendations!


You will also want the General's Handbook, a yearly release detailing the three different modes of play. Most importantly, it contains the points values for all armies so you can actually build balanced armies, the current "default" rules for Matched Play, and any additional quirks or battalions you need to be aware of.


Speaking of Battletomes, you'll want the one for your army if it has an up-to-date one. It'll have the Allegiance abilities, Battalion options to field your models in powerful formations, and magic items for your heroes. Also maybe some cool art in there as well.

Official LinksOther SA Threads

The Deleter fucked around with this message at 12:41 on Jul 20, 2021

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The Deleter
May 22, 2010


THE BIG FACTION ROUND-UP (Being updated for V3.0)
Confused as to who you wanna play as? Don't worry! All of the major players are summarized below, along with how they play and why you might want to pick them up.

You can also check out this video from HeyWoah, although it is more oriented to competitive play. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GDnkBnc2Q_s

ORDER

Stormcast Eternals
The Space Marines of the game. Legendary heroes "reforged" into lightning elemental warriors by the god-king Sigmar, the Stormcast are the vanguard of Order's efforts to reclaim the Mortal Realms. Yet each one fears death - for though they may be immortal, with each reforging they begin to lose their sense of self.
How Do They Play?
The three Chambers of the Stormcast allow you to be pretty flexible. The vanilla Stormcast prefer a hammer and anvil strategy, trapping enemies on a wall of tough melee troops before slamming into the flanks and peppering the foe with ranged abilities. The Vanguard Chamber prefers speed, ranged attacks and infiltrating from the sides of the board. The Sacrosanct chamber are heavy focused on magic and artillery. Mix and match all three to get the style you want!
Play Stormcast if you:
  • Are a beginner and want the easiest army to collect and paint.
  • Want a decent selection of tough bodies that will shrug off punishment and a flexible army composition.
  • Unironically listen to DragonForce.
Getting Started: Goonhammer guide


Sylvaneth
Angry trees. The Sylvaneth, lead by their god-queen Arielle, desperately battle to keep the forces of Nurgle out of their homeland. They don’t accept help lightly and view any trespassers with suspicion, but have forged an uneasy alliance with the free people of Sigmar.
How Do They Play?
The Sylvaneth are, understandably, not great in a straight fight. However, they have a mix of re-positioning abilities, dangerous terrain and powerful magic and shooting that can turn the tides in their favor. Abuse this as hard as possible in order to win games.
Play Sylvaneth if you:
  • Like to drybrush brown or do natural colors.
  • Enjoy repositioning tricks and want an excuse to add terrain to your boards with the Wildwood.
  • Think the Ents were the coolest part of Lord of the Rings.

Seraphon
Aztec Lizards riding Dinosaurs from space! The Seraphon live on temple-ships in the stars, teleporting down from on high to beat the poo poo out of Chaos. Some groups stick around after, building cities and weirding people out with blood sacrifices and odd rituals.
How Do They Play?
The Seraphon have fairly strong units that synergise with each other well, but their true strength lies in two factors - their enormous dinosaur-mounted siege engines, and access to the Slann Starmasters, arguably the most powerful wizards in the game. You can pick your poison of magic teleporting dinosaurs, or brutal less-magic dinosaurs, depending on which word in "magic dinosaurs" you like the most.
Play Seraphon if you:
  • Want to mess with spells, re-positioning and dinosaurs.
  • Would like a force that looks good in vivid colors.
  • Are obsessed with Jurassic Park.

Kharadron Overlords
Steampunk dwarves. The Overlords are dwarves who took to the skies to avoid the Age of Chaos, and have lived there ever since. Their society is a Objectivist clusterfuck that follows the Code, a multi-part document outlining how to do diplomacy, conduct business and wage war.
How Do They Play?
Overlord troops are unimpressive, although they sport a wide array of special weapons. Their true lynchpin is their airships, which can transport their line troops around the battlefield and pack amazing firepower. Additionally, their Allegiance Ability provides an entirely configurable set of bonuses, allowing you to pick and choose what you like the most.
Play Kharadron Overlords if you:
  • Want a bunch of impressive airship models as the centerpiece of the army.
  • Like big guns and cannot lie.
  • Played Bioshock and thought Andrew Ryan had the right idea.

Fyreslayers
Naked fire dwarves. Born of the blood of a dying dwarf god, the Fyreslayers are mercenaries seeking Ur-gold, an element formed of their dead god’s body. They hammer the precious resource into their skin for protection against blows, and ride giant salamanders into battle.
How Do They Play?
With only short-ranged shooting, Fyreslayers are focused on getting into melee as fast as possible. Thankfully, they can pick benefits each round that have the chance to go big, which ensure they'll get there and make a splash when they do. A small suite of support heroes enables them to do even more work.
Play Fyreslayers if you:
  • Like the idea of painting a LOT of skin.
  • Want a melee force with some punch and some basic but meaningful decision making.
  • Want an excuse to play JoJo’s Bizzare Adventure music during games.

Cities of Sigmar
The ordinary humans, elves and dwarfs of the setting. Residents of the cities that have been carved out in the Mortal Realms, the Cities send out forces to hold their territory, accompany Stormhosts into war and defend their people against the forces of Chaos.
How They Play
The Cities are an amalgamation of several old Warhammer Fantasy lines. Picking a City grants you bonuses that lean your forces in certain directions - from the massed ranks and cavalry charges of Hammerhal to the monster parade of Anvilguard. Additionally, a bewildering array of battleline options means that yes, you can field an army of Steam Tanks!
Play Cities of Sigmar if you:
  • Want to murder demons and monsters with a bunch of guns.
  • Want to paint old-school fantasy or historical-style forces, with heraldry and uniforms.
  • Miss Warhammer Fantasy a lot.

Daughters of Khaine
Morathi's personal murder gals. Bloodcrazed worshipers of the long dead God of Murder, feared by their supposed allies and their foes alike for their raw brutality and sinister blood magics.
How Do They Play?
The definition of a glass hammer, Daughters of Khaine hit hard and fast but struggle to take a punch themselves. A successful Daughters player relies on good positioning, target priority and utilizing the powerful buffs of their Hero units to pick apart the enemy before they can even hit back.
Play Daughters if:
  • You've got a lot of dice and need an excuse to roll them all at once.
  • You really, really like snakes.
  • You need some practice painting skin-tones.

Idoneth Deepkin
Fish Elves. Rejected children of the Elf God Teclis born with withered souls, the Idoneth use their reality warping powers, highly trained Namarti shock troops and tamed sea-monsters to overwhelm and reap the souls of the undeserving land-dwellers.
How Do They Play?
A tricksy faction, their Tides of Death ability gives an Idoneth force different bonuses depending on the turn number, rewarding careful planning and setting up for brutal alpha strikes when the time is right.
Play Idoneth if:
  • You fancy yourself a Ham Napoleon.
  • Want to build an army consisting of murder sharks.
  • Have a high tolerance for Little Mermaid jokes.

Lumineth Realmlords
It's High Elves again, but they've teamed up with rock cow spirits! After spending time getting eaten by Slaanesh and doing civil wars, the Realmlords decided that enough was enough, and have teamed up with the spirits of their land to kick some rear end and take some names.
How Do They Play?
Who loves elf bullshit? The Realmlords have a ton of abilities that can be levereaged either a hammer-and-anvil force, elite heavy infantry or a mobile cavalry force. They can also use Aetherquartz, cashing in the magic rock for buffs.
Play Lumineth if:
  • loving love Elves and are all smug about it.
  • Can't get enough of painting white.
  • Want to crush your foes old-school.

CHAOS

Slaves to Darkness
The standard Chaos boys. Slaves to Darkness is a grab-bag of barbarians, tribespeople and ne'er-do-wells have have thrown in their lot with the Chaos gods. They often follow Archaon, who acts as a figurehead for the will of chaos. He hates the job.
How Do They Play?
Lots of footmen, lots of horrible monsters. The Slaves to Darkness can be run alone, but are ideal to add into the more specialized Chaos armies as they can take any of the God's keywords. This means you can get easy access to bodies to fill out an army! You can also go more elite with Archaon's Varanguard if you hate your wallet.
Play Slaves to Darkness if:
  • You want to paint a lot of spikes.
  • You wan to just slam into the enemy, or need bodies to slam into the enemy.
  • You like a good maniacal laugh now and again.
Getting Started: Goonhammer guide


Disciples of Tzeentch
Magical ISIS. Cults that worship the God of Magic, and the various daemons they summon.
How Do They Play?
Extremely ranged focused, and some of the most powerful magic in the game. Can be run as a horde of human cultists all the way to a fairly elite army of mutants and sanity-damaging monsters. As an army special rule, they can "see the future" and essentially cheat by being able to switch out the result of dice rolls.
Play Disciples of Tzeentch if:
  • You like magic.
  • You like the idea of transforming your enemies into gibbering masses of flesh.
  • You like bird motifs.
  • You're fine with the fact that most armies will beat you handily in hand-to-hand, providing they make it there.
Getting Started: Goonhammer guide


Blades of Khorne
Muscle bound freaks of nature and zealous daemonic servants of the murder god. They were the first to meet the Stormcast head on and are the first to hurl themselves into the fray.
How Do They Play?
A wide array of point efficient heroes provides this melee oriented army a lot of buffs and special abilities, but don't expect to find ranged attacks or magic because those things are for puny cowards. An army that can be run as a horde of oiled reavers and minor daemons, or as a smaller team of elite blood warriors and heavy cavalry. A cool "blood tithe" mechanic gives you rewards or summons as you KILL.
Play Blades of Khorne if:
  • You love painting red. And you love seeing red.
  • You want to be able to pick from an absolutely massive set of killy list building options.
  • You don't mind sitting on your hands during the shooting phase.

Maggotkin of Nurgle
The disease-ridden mortal forces of the plague god Nurgle, backed by a swarm of daemons who are entirely too happy about having every disease possible. They want to turn everywhere into a filthy garden for their horrible flesh children to cavort in.
How Do They Play?
Slow but impossibly tough. The Maggotkin all pack inbuilt saves against every kind of damage. Additionally, they have the most complex Allegiance Abilities in the game, including a cycle of per-round buffs and abilities, a unique terrain feature, and a summoning system powered by taking and holding territory on the board.
Play Maggotkin of Nurgle if:
  • You want to use wet blends and washes to make something gross looking.
  • You enjoy playing the long game, from the set-up of your Gnarlmaws to when your Cycle of Corruption buffs land.
  • You've been listening to a bunch of Cannibal Corpse recently.

Hedonites of Slaanesh
Followers of the god of excess, perfection, and partying, birthed by the high elves getting a little out of control. (Good job, elves.) They seek to either free or replace their god, who’s currently imprisoned. (Good job, elves.)
How Do They Play?
Hedonites of Slaanesh are all about battlefield positioning. They have little in the way of shooting attacks or spells. To make up for this, they’re some of the fastest units in the game and many of their units have some way to reduce incoming damage by modifying your opponent’s hit rolls. They otherwise tend to hit hard, but crumble when the attacks do make it through.
Play Hosts of Slaanesh if:
  • You gotta go fast.
  • Like engaging the enemy on your terms.
  • You want to have multiple generals or one extra powerful one.
  • You like snakes with boobs.

Beasts of Chaos
Angry goat men and friends. Living in the wastes of the world, the Beasts of Chaos hate society and civilisation. Mutants and animistic rejects combine forces with the angriest animals in the world in order to burn down the pretty cities of Man.
How Do They Play?
The Beasts of Chaos are an allegiance of four separate subfactions - ambushing skirmishers, regenerating line troops, rapidly advancing heavy cavalry, and big gently caress-off monsters. United, they have access to the Herdstone, a terrain feature with an expanding armor-melting aura that can act as a sacrificial altar to summon monsters.
Play Creatures of Chaos if:
  • You want a paint scheme where multiple steps are "drown in brown wash".
  • You want a highly configurable horde faction with some of the coolest models from Warhammer Fantasy.
  • You wanna burn down The Man, man.

Skaven
Horrible ratmen. Survivors of the End Times, the Skaven are an omnipresent force of rat people who keep failing to take over the world thanks to a penchant for cowardice and backstabbing. Their deity, the Great Horned Rat, recently got his Chaos God membership card.
How Do They Play?
The basic Skaven gameplan is to send your hordes of lovely rats to die on the enemy, in order to buy time for your insane war machines and mutants to deal damage. Every clan has access to a unique trait on their characters, which you can access without going fully into those clans. This makes their army building very flexible, although by default they're a horde army.
Play Skaven if:
DEATH

Soulblight Gravelords
Vampires! The Soulblight is the fancy name for vampirism, and these fancy folks have it in spades. They are the generals of Nagash, raising the dead to enact his will. Each vampire seeks not only to conquer in the name of their god, but to secure themselves a plentiful food supply to sate their thirst for blood.
How Do They Play?
The Soulblight Gravelords play somewhat like classic Vampire Counts - big blocks of chaff skeletons and zombies that can eternally replenish themselves, lead by powerful Vampires, necromantic support units and undead monsters. With proper placement of their Gravesites and canny magic use, they can overwhelm their foe with numbers and control the board.
Play Soulblight Gravelords if you:
  • Like large, regenerating hordes of slow close-combat units that you can stack buffs onto.
  • Are also a fan of big horrible undead monsters.
  • Your favourite Sesame Street character was Count von Count.

Nighthaunt
Nagash isn't just an obsessive-compulsive soul collector - as god of the dead, he likes to give those who died ironic punishments based on their crimes in life. The Nighthaunt are these spirits, assembled into a vengeful army that wreaks havoc upon the living.
How Do They Play?
The Nighthaunt are an infantry-based faction, with their heroes designed to hinder and counter the tricks other factions might pull. Notably, all Nighthaunt models are Ethereal, meaning they ignore rend values, and can Fly, allowing them to pass through terrain.
Play Nighthaunt if:
  • You want an easy-to-paint force - a white spray and washes will take you far.
  • You want to laugh at the -2 rend on that hero's sword and then beat him to death.
  • You like spooky ghosts.

Flesheater Courts
The mad, deluded cosplaying cannibals of the Death hosts. Ghouls (or ‘Mordants’) are the remnants of people who resorted to cannibalism to stay alive when the forces of Chaos ravaged the mortal realms. Most of them have fallen under the sway of deranged vampire outcasts known as Ghoul Kings, who delude themselves into believing they are fine and noble lords, the ghouls their courtiers, and everyone else quarry to be hunted down and eaten in glorious “banquets.”
How Do They Play?
Standard FEC armies tend to be composed of large units of ghouls supported by heroes (the ghoul kings and their courtiers), who augment their hordes with powerful buffs, healing, and summoned replacements for dead troops. This means that Flesheaters are a very resilient horde army, but are quite weak against opponents with strong ranged units that can snipe the heroes the army depends on for buffs and summons.
Play Flesheater Courts if you:
  • Like large, regenerating hordes of fast, close-combat units that you can stack an obscene number of buffs onto.
  • Are very fond of pale fleshtones and smearing your models in bloody-red, but don’t want to play Khorne for whatever reason.
  • Want to play an army of deranged larpers.

Ossiarch Bonereapers
Pay your taxes! Nagash's answer to the Stormcast, the Bonereapers are an army of skeletal warriors made of fused souls, who enact as his morbid tax collectors. Lead by the Xerxes-like Krakatos, they demand only one thing of the cities they besiege - pay the tithe of bones, or have it taken from you.
How Do They Play?
Using a unique system of Relentless Discipline points instead of regular Command Points, the Bonereapers are a flexible force that play in a very straightforward manner. Keeping their heroes alive is required to maintain the undead's discipline, which you can then leverage into powerful abilities.
Play Ossairch Bonereapers if you:
  • Want a resilient force where every unit can operate semi-independently.
  • Want to paint lots of bone, overlapping plates and more bone.
  • Want to get spooky and/or scary.
DESTRUCTION
ORRUK WARCLANS
In 2019, the Orcs got a revamp with a new Battletome - Orruk Warclans, which combines the below forces into one. When fielded as one, they gain extra bonuses. Below are the two solo forces, and the addition of the new;


Ironjawz
Ironjawz are the meanest, toughest and dumbest Orcs around. They rarely can count beyond five, but that's because that's how many fingers are on the hands they use to bend iron into armor and to punch the weaklings that get in their way.
How Do They Play?
Angry kill machines, Ironjawz are good at one thing and that thing is fighting. They really rely on their characters, but with a proper array of buffs/spells they become crazy powerful. They have good allies, as in they can ally all orcs and grots, so you get access to all the grot artillery which is great.
Play Ironjawz if:
  • You want to paint some of the coolest orc models ever made
  • You want to murder everything in melee, and especially monsters!
  • You are ok with having your key models shot off the board by assholes with shooting

Bonesplitterz
Evangelical Primitivist Orcs. Lead by the barely lucid Wurrgog Prophets, these Orruks believe that Gorkamorka has charged them to murder the biggest, nastiest foes they can find. Considered complete nutters by other Orcs, Bonesplitterz go to battle wearing nothing but warpaint and wielding the bones of slain monsters, imbued with the power of Gork and Mork.
How Do They Play?
Despite stomping around the battlefield butt naked, Bonesplitterz are shockingly tough with their special Warpaint save potentially shrugging off the most lethal of attacks. They get big bonuses when fighting monsters and other big targets, and favour drowning foes in lots and lots and lots of attacks.
Play Bonesplitterz if you:
  • Don't mind going through buckets of green paint.
  • Fancy yourself a tattoo artist.
  • Really want to make the local Beastclaw Raiders players cry.

Kruleboyz
Sneaky backstabby Orcs. Favouring being Kunnin' over Brutal, the Kruleboyz inhabit the swamps of the Mortal Realms, backstabbing and fighting for the top spot. Now that Kragnos the god is free, they are looking to team up with him and take the Mortal Realms by storm.
How Do They Play?
Currently the Kruleboyz aren't widely available. Their previewed rules suggest an emphasis on valumes of attacks, tricksy abilities and rare shooting support that other orc armies lack.
Play Kruleboyz if you:
  • Bought Dominion recently.
Combined, Ironjawz, Bonesplitterz and Kruleboyz gain an escalating WAAAGH resource which grants stacking bonuses, and can be blown in a final insane round of combat.


Gloomspite Gitz
Fundamentalist goblins! Lead by the mad Loonking Skragrott, the Gloomspite Gitz emerge from the mountains of the Realm of Metal whenever the Bad Moon passes. They worship the moon and wish to commit an act of cowardly atrocity so great it will stop in the sky, cloaking the realm in night forever.
How Do They Play?
Whether you take a horde of goblins, spiders and squigs, or just a small bunch of trolls, the Gloomspite Gitz are a opportunistic, positioning-based faction who must keep an eye on the Bad Moon. The passage of this celestial object debuffs the enemy and powers up your troops, so position accordingly!
Play Gloomspite Gitz if
  • You have a Night Goblin army left over from the old days.
  • You want to paint some really fun models in some wild colors.
  • You like weird monsters and want to field a bunch of them.

Ogor Mawtribes
Hungry, angry ogres. The Ogors are driven by a supernatural hunger, and whilst they tend to get their fix from eating whomever they fight and buddying up with orcs, they're canny enough to barter their services as mercenaries to whomever can feed them.
How Do They Play?
Heavy infantry and large models galore. You'll be hard pressed to find a model that has less than three or four wounds and can dish out the damage in return. In an army, an Ogor exists in two states - hungry and rushing to make contact, or eating the foe and becoming very tough to shift! Backed by the monstrously powerful cavalry of the Beastclaw Raiders and the chaff swarms of Gnoblars, this is the definition of an elite army.
Play Ogor Mawtribes if
  • You want a small model count army with a few big centrepiece models.
  • You want to be hugely resilient and deal mortal wounds like candy.
  • You don't want a lot of models taking up space in your closet.

Sons of Behemat
Giants galore! Whilst the gargants have been part of the setting for a while, its only recently they've started to band together. With the death of their father, the god-beast Behemat, the giants of the realms are slowly growing bigger and bigger - and one may soon take his place.
How Do They Play?
Often compared to Knights in 40k, this is a similar theme - a small army of monstrous figures. Pick your favourite kind of Mega-Gargant to lead the army - the horde-destroying Warstomper, the scenery-breaking Gatebreaker, or the shiny-stealing Krakentooth - and the smaller giants in the band will inherit some of their skills and traits. If you're not a fan of that, though, you can ally in named Mega-Gargants into any other army!
Play Sons of Behemat if
  • You want an army of only centrepiece models and monsters.
  • You want to go ham with customisations and conversions on a few big models.
  • You thought Roald Dahl's BFG was for suckers.

The Deleter fucked around with this message at 10:24 on Jul 7, 2021

Der Waffle Mous
Nov 27, 2009

In the grim future, there is only commerce.


just realized the charge reroll CA is now done *after* the roll and it suddenly seems so much more useful.

bagrada
Aug 4, 2007

The Demogorgon is tired of your silly human bickering!


Almighty Sigmar, I pray to you, if I'm able to get a copy of Dominion ordered Saturday, I vow to actually start painting all these models I'm collecting. I might even actually play a game this year.

Mulva
Sep 13, 2011
It's about time for my once per decade ban for being a consistently terrible poster.

From the last thread:

Der Waffle Mous posted:

oh poo poo did they make Anvil of Apotheosis part of the core rules?

Universal enhancements mean that there are certain things you can give to any hero, agnostic of army. It's not super deep, but a mini-spell lore and the ability to make any hero a wizard does allow for some silly things, like a Tank that is also a wizard with a flaming sword.

Talas
Aug 27, 2005



Legions of Nagash should be Soulblight Gravelords, OP

The Deleter
May 22, 2010


Talas posted:

Legions of Nagash should be Soulblight Gravelords, OP

I'm working on it, no worries!

JollyBoyJohn
Feb 13, 2019



I hope there are some cool new Skaven models sometime soon

Verisimilidude
Dec 20, 2006

Strike quick and hurry at him,
not caring to hit or miss.
So that you dishonor him before the judges





Missed opportunity to name this thread Age of Sigmar v3.0: It's a Krule, Krule, Krule Summer

Deified Data
Nov 3, 2015




Fun Shoe

Is it crazy that the first thing I'm painting out of Dominion is Yndrasta

God her with Praetors passing off wounds on 3+, Praetors ignoring on 5+, if they don't intercept she has a 4+ ward and if a Praetor croaks she just revives it. In combination with the new banner guy this is a very tough clump of units to move.

Floppychop
Mar 30, 2012



JollyBoyJohn posted:

I hope there are some cool new Skaven models sometime soon

Someone at my LGS pointed out that the Bombardier warlock is the only new model Skaven have gotten (outside of endless spells/terrain) in AoS.

JollyBoyJohn
Feb 13, 2019



Floppychop posted:

Someone at my LGS pointed out that the Bombardier warlock is the only new model Skaven have gotten (outside of endless spells/terrain) in AoS.

That's wild but then I suppose no one wants to think about replacing 160 clanrats

Beerdeer
Apr 25, 2006
Big Dick McGee

Talas posted:

Legions of Nagash should be Soulblight Gravelords, OP

Look what they did to my poor Legion army

Deified Data
Nov 3, 2015




Fun Shoe

JollyBoyJohn posted:

That's wild but then I suppose no one wants to think about replacing 160 clanrats

Clanrats at least are probably safe - they're relatively new plastic and the sculpts more than hold up to AoS plastics. What we really need are plastic Plague Monks, Skryre Acolytres, and Night Runners.

BaronVanAwesome
Sep 11, 2001

I will never learn the secrets of "Increased fake female boar sp..."

Never say never, buddy.
Now you know.
Now we all know.


Beerdeer posted:

Look what they did to my poor Legion army



Excited to start playing with whatever army builder gets updated first with the new list building rules!

Talas
Aug 27, 2005



Floppychop posted:

Someone at my LGS pointed out that the Bombardier warlock is the only new model Skaven have gotten (outside of endless spells/terrain) in AoS.
They also got an Underworlds warband.

Crazy Ferret
May 11, 2007

Welp


Deified Data posted:

Clanrats at least are probably safe - they're relatively new plastic and the sculpts more than hold up to AoS plastics. What we really need are plastic Plague Monks, Skryre Acolytres, and Night Runners.

Plague Monks are in plastic and not terrible, if a bit boring. Make a good horde tho.

New Skryre and Eshin troops would be great. Eshin in particular is pretty bad in both age and look. The old monkey skaven are real bad against any of the new sculpts. I'd love to see the Eshin Stormvermin from Total Warhammer come over but wish list stuff.

Floppychop
Mar 30, 2012



Clan rats, Stormvermin, and Plague Monks are all fine imo. Eshin and Moulder need full reboots and Skryre needs new acolytes(globadiers) and weapon teams. Also the only non-verminlord HQs that are plastic are the Bombardier, one clawlord, and a Grey seer.

Stuff like the artillery pieces, doomwheel, and Stormfiends are great though.

I don't think there's anyone currently at GW that really likes Skaven though, at least in the design/development area. So I'm not holding my breath on Skaven getting much fun stuff for a while.

The Deleter
May 22, 2010


Big faction post has been updated.

I am pretty inspired to go on with my Deepkin, but I want to see how the points costs shake out. Currently I don't have quite enough models to field a coherent army, and I'm pretty sure the fuckers at KR multicase gave me a pretty unoptimal solution to storing them and also their basing sucks rear end, so I'm gonna have to really get down to it.

MonsterEnvy
Feb 4, 2012


It's nice to just have the new rules again. Looking forward to seeing what changes the Generals Handbook brings.

Lucinice
Feb 15, 2012

You look tired. Maybe you should stop posting.

Alright I've decided my first AoS army is going to be Tzeentch. I want to run some Chaos Warriors in it too but I wonder how that's going to work out will all the upcoming changes.

Macdeo Lurjtux
Jul 5, 2011

BRRREADSTOOORRM!


Lucinice posted:

Alright I've decided my first AoS army is going to be Tzeentch. I want to run some Chaos Warriors in it too but I wonder how that's going to work out will all the upcoming changes.

I doubt there would be a problem. Chaos Warriors have an ability that lets you declare them for a party up at God. Use that ability to declare them for Tzeentch and you can take them as battleline.

Lucinice
Feb 15, 2012

You look tired. Maybe you should stop posting.

Macdeo Lurjtux posted:

I doubt there would be a problem. Chaos Warriors have an ability that lets you declare them for a party up at God. Use that ability to declare them for Tzeentch and you can take them as battleline.

Weren't people worried about the changes in battleline sizes in relation to chaos? Might have misread.

TheDiceMustRoll
Jul 23, 2018


Am I mad to use dominion rules with Soulbound go create the ultimate warhammer narrative experience?

Talas
Aug 27, 2005



TheDiceMustRoll posted:

Am I mad to use dominion rules with Soulbound go create the ultimate warhammer narrative experience?
You are the opposite of mad, go for it!

actually3raccoons
Jun 5, 2013





The Path to Glory rules have me psyched to get my StD crew painted at last.

Revelation 2-13
May 13, 2010



Pillbug

Did they do literally nothing about the double turn in the core rules? It’s completely insane to me if that’s the case. The overwatch thing doesn’t address it at all (in some ways it makes it worse imo).

The only reason I can think of is that one of the important people at GW who originally came up with it, has an incredible amount of pride invested in the double turn, in a principle skinner “it’s the children who are all wrong”-style denial of reality. Actually the double is good! I don’t care what most players, from casual to competitive, thinks! They are all wrong.

Also I hate the rally ability, I’d like some more potentially incredible impactful rng to go with my already stupidly impactful rng. Yo, could you add some more game deciding rng to my aos please? Maybe it’s a smaller deal than I think it is.

Anyway, other than that I like 3.0, it’s very slick and clear compared to previous. It looks like I’m going to be the only one in my group playing it still though, which sucks since a bunch of them were poised to be lured back in to the fantasy side of things and I wouldn’t have to go to tournaments by myself etc. Double turn is just a hard no, especially since there doesn’t actually appear to anything done to mitigate it. Like, at all. Maybe there will be new command abilities that lets you activate a unit in the movement phase? In the charge phase? Anything GW? Anything at all? For the love of god, I’m grasping at straws here.


e: vv usually people argue that the double-turn requires skill and expertise to take advantage of, making it harder, not easier for a weaker player to win once in a while. Personally I just think it's one of the dumbest mechanics (top 3 at least) ever invented in the history of board games, let alone warhammer games - that includes combat resolution. I'm not even exaggerating, though obviously it's just like; my opinion. I know literally no one irl who doesn't think it's good mechanic. A couple of people are like 'meh', but most thinks it's lame.

Revelation 2-13 fucked around with this message at 09:52 on Jun 15, 2021

HidaO-Win
Jun 5, 2013

"And I did it, because I was a man who had exhausted reason and thus turned to magicks"

The double turn is either someone’s precious fluffy boy or it’s their version of mana screw/mana flood from MTG. A quirk of the core mechanics that allows weak players to occasionally beat stronger ones. This is to keep weaker players invested and not have them bow out after unending defeats.

TheDiceMustRoll
Jul 23, 2018


Are there any good nighthaunt 500 point boxes? I see there isn't a Start Collecting! Nighthaunt which is quite disappointing.

The Deleter
May 22, 2010


There's probably plenty of Soul Wars halves on eBay ATM - they're a decent starting point. I'd say that if you wanna get any of the easy build Nighthaunt stuff, get it now cos they're likely to go Out of Print once the 3rs edition starters roll around. I would bet some money on a Start Collecting being released alongside the next Nighthaunt battletome.

MonsterEnvy
Feb 4, 2012


Honestly there are a lot of double turn negation in the rules now.

No. 1 Juicy Boi
Jun 1, 2003

#1 JUICY BOY



Buglord

Come onnnnn v3, make Sylvaneth good again!

Mikey Purp
Sep 30, 2008

I realized it's gotten out of control. I realize I'm out of control.

I'm as bummed as the next guy that the double turn still exists, but I don't see how anyone can say that they did absolutely nothing to address it.
  • CP changes
  • Hero abilities
  • New "Interrupts" e.g. Unleash Hell
  • Endless Spell changes
And I'm sure I missed a few, but I think they did a lot to shift the gameplay in a way that de-emphasizes the priority roll by giving the defending player more agency and interaction during the turn. To me it seems like the guiding principle for this edition was "keep the priority roll at all costs, but mitigate its impact."

I wish that they had just nixed it entirely, but for whatever reason its important to them to keep it. On the bright side, designing around the priority roll might have resulted in some really exciting changes that minimize downtime and make the game more interesting in ways that probably wouldn't have happened otherwise. Obviously no one knows if any of these changes will be successful yet, but it seems really promising to me.

Cooked Auto
Aug 4, 2007

If you will not serve in combat, you will serve on the firing line!




https://www.warhammer-community.com/2021/06/15/ghur-basically-eats-your-objectives-with-the-rules-in-the-new-generals-handbook/

General's Handbook preview article up.

AnEdgelord
Dec 12, 2016




No balewind vortex in those endless spell warscroll updates.

Talas
Aug 27, 2005



Mikey Purp posted:

I'm as bummed as the next guy that the double turn still exists, but I don't see how anyone can say that they did absolutely nothing to address it.
  • CP changes
  • Hero abilities
  • New "Interrupts" e.g. Unleash Hell
  • Endless Spell changes
And I'm sure I missed a few, but I think they did a lot to shift the gameplay in a way that de-emphasizes the priority roll by giving the defending player more agency and interaction during the turn. To me it seems like the guiding principle for this edition was "keep the priority roll at all costs, but mitigate its impact."

I wish that they had just nixed it entirely, but for whatever reason its important to them to keep it. On the bright side, designing around the priority roll might have resulted in some really exciting changes that minimize downtime and make the game more interesting in ways that probably wouldn't have happened otherwise. Obviously no one knows if any of these changes will be successful yet, but it seems really promising to me.

Agreed. Personally, I like the priority roll, but I know it's not for everyone. At least, for the very recent batreps coming out with AoS 3.0 rules, it seems like its impact is quite diminished, more than I first thought, as you can see in this example, where both players traded priority rolls in the second and third turn:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SRd4-S21QJ0

The Deleter
May 22, 2010


AnEdgelord posted:

No balewind vortex in those endless spell warscroll updates.

This is probably for the best - that spell has been an eternal pain in the rear end to balance for basically forever. What GW will do with the model now is anyone's guess. Maybe the old warscroll will still be legal?

It also looks like the official missions in that pack will have stuff for people that choose to go second (removing an objective holy lmao). Anybody rate those core battalions in there?

Deified Data
Nov 3, 2015




Fun Shoe

The infiltrating monsters seem pretty tasty if you're bringing monsters

Chainclaw
Feb 14, 2009



Mikey Purp posted:

I'm as bummed as the next guy that the double turn still exists, but I don't see how anyone can say that they did absolutely nothing to address it.
  • CP changes
  • Hero abilities
  • New "Interrupts" e.g. Unleash Hell
  • Endless Spell changes
And I'm sure I missed a few, but I think they did a lot to shift the gameplay in a way that de-emphasizes the priority roll by giving the defending player more agency and interaction during the turn. To me it seems like the guiding principle for this edition was "keep the priority roll at all costs, but mitigate its impact."

I wish that they had just nixed it entirely, but for whatever reason its important to them to keep it. On the bright side, designing around the priority roll might have resulted in some really exciting changes that minimize downtime and make the game more interesting in ways that probably wouldn't have happened otherwise. Obviously no one knows if any of these changes will be successful yet, but it seems really promising to me.

You also get to destroy an objective if you go second on round 3.

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Floppychop
Mar 30, 2012



The Deleter posted:

This is probably for the best - that spell has been an eternal pain in the rear end to balance for basically forever. What GW will do with the model now is anyone's guess. Maybe the old warscroll will still be legal?

It's not even sold anymore, so my guess is that at best it will get a legends entry.

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