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Megabound
Oct 20, 2012



Things. They've existed for a long time, a real long time, some of them don't work anymore and that sucks because they could work again, and you could be the arbiter of that!

My hobby is photography with a side of repairing old cameras so I can take more photos with cameras that don't get the recognition and love they deserve. I'm not professionally trained, and I couldn't screw 2 bits of wood together if my life depended on it, but with time, patience, a steady hand, lots of photos and the help of the internet you too can bring these things back to life again in as new condition.

I don't just like seeing cameras get a second lease on life, I like seeing everything get brought back! Watches, furniture, tools, musical instruments. If it's broken I want to see it fixed, and I want to see how you did it.

Coming Soon: Tools I use that I can't live without, best practices, tips and tricks

My working on small stuff starter kit:


Isopropyl and lighter fluid (not pictured) for cleaning up things that are stuck
Toothpicks for holding things in the right place and nudging components
Cotton buds for cleaning hard to get areas
At least one pair of good quality tweezers
Scribes and hooks for setting springs back where they should be and getting them off posts
JIS screwdriver set for Japanese gear, and whatever else they'll fit
Micro screwdriver set for everything else
Cutting board as a work surface

I also recommend a box with many small compartments for seperating components into groups and lots of tiny ziplock bags for the same reason

Megabound fucked around with this message at 05:24 on Aug 3, 2021

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Megabound
Oct 20, 2012



I set aside a day to get this Plaubel Roll-Op serviced. I'd never worked on a shutter this old before (1936 Compur Rapid) and of course, every manufacturer of the Compur Rapid did it a bit differently, different components and gear trains and so forth. Chris Sherlocks video on servicing compur-rapids was invaluable. Anyway, here's some photos from the experience.

Setting up


After figuring out how to remove the shutter from the body.


Getting the nameplate and the shutter speed cam out of the way


A look at some very oily shutter blades


10 even oilier aperture blades, it only took 5 attempts at setting the blades to get it right. Pain in the dick.


After cleaning and reassembly
https://i.imgur.com/l8sjHdG.gifv

State of the rear element before a clean with ammonia and peroxide


After cleaning, there's a little etching but you gotta get it in just the right light to see it. I don't see it effecting the final image


I also needed to replace a mirror in the rangefinder section, this is the old mirror


And this is the new mirror in place, had to cut it myself and it was the first time I'd ever done any glass cutting.


All done!


Now, how does it work?



What you're looking at here is the shutter with the cam plate on it. The shutter is currently in T mode (this opens the shutter on one release, and closes it on the next, T for Time), you rotate the plate to select speeds so in this case, as we rotate counter-clockwise we're adjusting the speed from 1 second to 1/400th of a second.

What sets the speed is the blue component. This is the retard gear train follower, as that follower lowers, the shutter speed gets longer, it's currently in a fully disengaged position for T and B modes, it's all the way up as the shutter is not cocked.

The red component is what engages that gear train, it'll ride that steep slope upwards and allow the gear train follower to drop into that valley, selecting the shutter speed

The orange component is the cocking lever, there's a big spring attached to it that supplies the energy to fire the mechanism, this spring pulls a ratchet against the retard gear train to, you guessed it, retard the motion of that gear train and slow it down. The gear train has to travel through it's entire range of motion before the shutter will close again. By limiting the range of motion you can set shutter speeds.

The purple component is the high speed spring. Getting speeds up to 1/400th of a second is difficult, their solution, add a big ol spring that only engages for that speed, adding energy to the system to snap the shutter through as quickly as possible.

The green is the shutter release lever. You can see the lever it's engaging. When you move that lever out of the way the cocking lever can release its energy. Through its range of motion it will open the shutter blades, keep them open until the time elapses, then snap them shut.

The only other major component in that mechanism is a self-timer. It'll delay firing for 10 seconds so you can set up a shot then run out and get in the photo. It's hidden under the plate. All the other components are springs and catches to makes sure things stay in the right place, get caught at the right time and release only when intended. Under all of this is the aperture which is some interleaved blades that let you choose your depth of field and how much light you'll let through.

Megabound fucked around with this message at 03:21 on Aug 2, 2021

Megabound
Oct 20, 2012



One from the archives, I fixed a Voightlander Perkeo I for fun, and part of that fun had to involve constructing a new bellows. I followed this tutorial and bought a template off of him and would recommend it. It's slow work but nothing too taxing.

Step 1: Tape down your template onto your card stock.


Step 2: Remove the cat from the work piece


Step 3: Extend the green lines out into the card stock, then with a ballpoint pen apply heavy pressure and score each and every black line.


Step 4: Flip the work over and put a dot at each intersection with a pencil


Step 5: Score all of those lines with a pen


Step 6: Remove the template and draw some more lines like this, these will be tabs for aligning the bellows when gluing


Step 7: Cut it out leaving the tabs there and glue it together, making sure it all matches up nicely


Step 8: Fold slowly


Step 9: Keep on folding


Here it is months later, after a paint and install. It's held up very well and is now soft and supple, shows no signs of developing holes but we'll see, the material was experimental

Ziggy Smalls
May 24, 2008

If pain's what you
want in a man,
Pain I can do


Tentative future repair here.

I bought a possibly Nazi Germany Wirgin Edinex 35mm camera off of Keh's ebay page for about 15$ 5 years ago.

Mine is very similar to this model pictured:


Only differences are that mine has a Compur-Rapid shutter and a 5cm f2.9 Gewironar that is possibly a copy of the Meyer Trioplan

My first test roll came out fine other than a visible broken piece of film overlapping every frame.



I opened it up carefully and took the broken film piece out and ran two more rest rolls though it. With both other rolls, I experienced some tension followed by the film breaking. Its sat in a drawer since then.

I'm going to open it up again later this week and see if I can find any clues. The real annoying part is some of the original Edinex models had a flap on the back to help with loading the film reminiscent of Leica film bodies and my Edinex definitely does not.

I'd love to get this camera working.

Megabound
Oct 20, 2012



Tension + film breaking sounds like the take-off side being gummed up, or something catching the sprockets on advance. The nice thing about that era is all the complexity is in the shutter, all of the body mechanisms should be pretty straight forward.

Ziggy Smalls
May 24, 2008

If pain's what you
want in a man,
Pain I can do


Megabound posted:

Tension + film breaking sounds like the take-off side being gummed up, or something catching the sprockets on advance. The nice thing about that era is all the complexity is in the shutter, all of the body mechanisms should be pretty straight forward.

Are there any specific solvents and lubricants you might suggest? I don't want to ruin any 70 year old parts.

Megabound
Oct 20, 2012



For solvents the go to is lighter fluid. We call it shellite in Aus, naphtha in most other places. For lubricants graphite powder is what I use for gear trains, molybdenum grease for mating surfaces and sewing machine oil for pivots. In all cases the correct amount to use is "So little I'm not sure if I even put any on". Aperture and shutter blades should have no lubrication at all.

The biggest concern won't be damaging anything with the application but migration to places where it shouldn't be.

Thumposaurus
Jul 24, 2007



A little back story here:
A local music store gets items damaged in shipment and they throw them in the dumpster out back. I occasionally check it out and fix what I can.


Supervisor inspecting my work

This was a body and neck that were found on 2 different outings.
The neck was originally from a bolt on model of the guitar while the body was a set neck body.
The neck area in the body was damaged I cut out the damaged wood and glued in a blockto rebuild a neck tenon area.

Sanded and filled in the grain on the body and shot some lacquer on it.




Let it cure for about a month and wet sanded and polished the finish and reassembled it.


I found this the other night minus the head stock I've got a few spare ones from other damaged necks I should be able to graft one onto it.

Cool thread! I like seeing broken poo poo get fixed instead of thrown out.

Megabound
Oct 20, 2012



That is super rad, and looks sick. Sanding and polishing is always a good time, the end results are always worth the investment.

3D Megadoodoo
Nov 25, 2010

I'M A HUMORLESS FUCKWIT WHO SUCKS ALMOST AS BAD AS THAT WASTE OF A SCANDINAVIAN COUNTRY, FINLAND. ALSO I WRITE LIKE A FUCKING MORON.


Megabound posted:

For solvents the go to is lighter fluid. We call it shellite in Aus, naphtha in most other places.

No it's called lighter fluid/fuel in most places.

Trabant
Nov 26, 2011

All systems nominal.


Thanks for starting the thread, Megabound -- looking forward to The Goon Repair Shop!

I have nothing recent to share, but a couple years ago I revived this thing (previously posted in the Projects thread):



And it works, albeit I make linocuts only every couple of months or so.

A more detailed repair log is here.

Slugworth
Feb 18, 2001

If two grown men can't make a pervert happy for a few minutes in order to watch a film about zombies, then maybe we should all just move to Iran!


Thanks so much for making this thread, I'm fascinated by tiny little mechanisms like that camera lense, watches, etc.

Question - You say aperture blades shouldn't have any lubrication, but mentioned in the first post that the blades you were working on were oily. Is that grime that builds up over the years, or did they used to be lubricated?

Megabound
Oct 20, 2012



Slugworth posted:

Thanks so much for making this thread, I'm fascinated by tiny little mechanisms like that camera lense, watches, etc.

Question - You say aperture blades shouldn't have any lubrication, but mentioned in the first post that the blades you were working on were oily. Is that grime that builds up over the years, or did they used to be lubricated?

They weren't lubricated in the first place, but oils can travel through the mechanisms. You focus a lens in multiple different ways but one of those would be a helicord. Helicords needs a bit of grease for smooth motion. Over time the volatile components of that grease will flash off and go to places they're not supposed to, this'll leave both oily deposits and deposits of solids all throughout the shutter. It also has the side effect of making your focus very stiff cause all of the lubricating components have hosed off elsewhere.

This is one of the focusing helicords from a '52 Jupiter-12, as you can see it's picked up a ton of detritus from that grease breaking down, which made its way all through the lens:


and after a good clean:


This lens is particularly interesting in and of itself. The majority of The Soviet Unions camera output was based on German designs, as after WWII they got to raid their camera factories. This lens is a mix parts, some made by Germany during the war for military use (the olive drab paint) and some made post war in Soviet factories, and the entire lens itself is a pre-war Carl-Zeiss Biogon design.

bEatmstrJ
Jun 30, 2004

Look upon my bathroom joists, ye females, and despair.


Decided to give this old Stanley Bailey hand plane a once over. Picked up a set of them and slowly going to restore all of them. This was my first time restoring something like this. Plane is circa mid 1930s.

Pre-restoration


Taken apart


All cleaned up


Side-by-side with another yet to finished


yaffle
Sep 15, 2002

Flapdoodle

What a great thread! I dint have the patience for tiny things like camera shutters, I would go mad. Rebuilding bicycles is about my limit.
I will share, if that's ok, my favorite fixing thing youtube channel: Hand Tool Rescue
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oUWOOFII144
Here he is restoring a crazy dangerous shop saw.

Trabant
Nov 26, 2011

All systems nominal.


yaffle posted:

What a great thread! I dint have the patience for tiny things like camera shutters, I would go mad. Rebuilding bicycles is about my limit.
I will share, if that's ok, my favorite fixing thing youtube channel: Hand Tool Rescue
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oUWOOFII144
Here he is restoring a crazy dangerous shop saw.

Ahahaah jfc that is terrifying

Arsenic Lupin
Apr 11, 2012

This particularly rapid unintelligible patter isn't generally heard, and if it is, it doesn't matter.





bEatmstrJ posted:

Decided to give this old Stanley Bailey hand plane a once over. Picked up a set of them and slowly going to restore all of them. This was my first time restoring something like this. Plane is circa mid 1930s.

Pre-restoration


Taken apart


All cleaned up


Side-by-side with another yet to finished




How did you clean up the metal? Gorgeous job. I appreciate your restraint in not replacing the knob.

Megabound
Oct 20, 2012



yaffle posted:

What a great thread! I dint have the patience for tiny things like camera shutters, I would go mad. Rebuilding bicycles is about my limit.
I will share, if that's ok, my favorite fixing thing youtube channel: Hand Tool Rescue
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oUWOOFII144
Here he is restoring a crazy dangerous shop saw.

Hand Tool Rescue is a treasure and all his videos are amazing.

bEatmstrJ
Jun 30, 2004

Look upon my bathroom joists, ye females, and despair.


Arsenic Lupin posted:

How did you clean up the metal? Gorgeous job. I appreciate your restraint in not replacing the knob.

Dry brush to remove dirt and debris. Some degreaser with a toothbrush to remove residue, then a whole lot of wire wheel on a bench grinder, with smaller wire wheels on a drill for tight spaces. Sanded the handles, oiled with teak oil then added a little beeswax on top.

Trabant
Nov 26, 2011

All systems nominal.


This is not exactly complex stuff, but here are some mid-restoration progress pics:

Got some chunks of rust vintage cobbler's hammers from ebay:



Decided to try some Evapo-rust after seeing the magic Hand Tool Rescue does with it. Behold, the :piss: jar:



Nice and murky after about 18 hours:



(yes, pee is stored in the balls, I know)

Highly recommending this stuff, it truly is magic:



The one on the left got a wire wheel treatment:



And both cleaned up:



Got some nice ash and cherry stock for the handles but won't get to turn them until next weekend :negative:

Megabound
Oct 20, 2012



Magnificent, looking forward to seeing them completed.

I've been paused on finishing the Roll-Op. I was doing final calibrations and adjustments when I realised that someone had replaced the chain that drives the rangefinder with one that is a bit too short so I'm waiting on some new chain to arrive.
In the meanwhile someone gave me another Autocord which is seriously seized. Busted it open last night and got the shutter to fire unreliably so I'll need to set aside a day and break it all down very carefully.

My personal Autocord, one of my favorite cameras.



Shutter out of the seized one


Kind of photos these guys can produce when they're in good order, beautiful lenses on them.

Trabant
Nov 26, 2011

All systems nominal.


Megabound posted:

Shutter out of the seized one


That mechanism strongly reminds me of my grandfather's pocket watch, which is about the same vintage (+/- 20 years, I think).

edit: found some pics of it I posted in the watch thread:



Trabant fucked around with this message at 15:50 on Aug 30, 2021

Megabound
Oct 20, 2012



I managed to find another day to myself and the last piece for the Roll-Op arrived so now it's finally ready for use. I thought it was going to be ready much earlier until I found out someone had replaced the chain in the rangefinder section with one that was too short meaning it couldn't be adjusted to infinity and it didn't open and close smoothly. Let's dig in!

So, here's the camera with the lens off and a diagram of where the chain would normally go, the toothpick is there to keep the bottom lever in place.:


The spring on the right hand side of the picture is pulling the lever at the bottom up. As the silver section rotates counter-clockwise that lever gets pulled up and the rangefinder adjusts for the chosen focus. We'll go into how the rangefinder works in a bit. Here's a photo of the focus lever and scale:


Here's the new chain in place, it's very fine, 0.5mm in diameter. I had the end of the chain dangling out of the where it screws into for fine adjustment, I'd loose the screw a little, adjust, test the opening and closing action then repeat until everything only just cleared.


I had to do this twice, as the first time I tried to be lazy and just screw the chain down as shown. This just snapped it and it came rocketing out the tiny hole so I did it again and properly. Now, I can not stress how useful toothpicks are to have at all times, I stuck one in this screen hole so I could coil the chain around it and keep it clear.


Now on to the rangefinder. This is an early rangefinder that works by converging the top and bottom of an image together, something like in this photo:


You can see through the sign here that the top and bottom of the pole don't converge. As you change focus they will converge and when they do you can say that that distance is in focus. This works the same way as your eyes do. If you hold a finger directly in front of your right eye it's looking straight ahead while your left eye needs to look towards the right. As you move your finger further away your left eye has to adjust to a shallower and shallower angle to keep that in focus. Here's what that looks like with mirrors in the rangefinder
https://i.imgur.com/jAuz4L4.gifv

As I move that silver lever the right hand mirror gets moved forwards and backwards, moving the reflected image from the mirror on the left. Here's a look at the front of the camera and the 2 windows used in the rangefinder


Here's the path the light takes to your eye. The blue path is the top image. It comes over the top of the mirror and into your eye directly. The red path is the bottom image, it comes through the front of the camera, reflects off the mirrors and then enters your eye.


And here's what it looks like through the rangefinder, as you can see the top and bottom image line up so that power pole is in focus.


Now we can get on to adjustment. To adjust the rangefinder we focus the camera to infinity, point it at a sufficiently distant object and turn some screws until we converge the object at infinity. This screw here adjusts the horizontal angle at which the mirror is held, brining the object into and out of convergence.


And this screw here adjusts the vertical angle of the mirror, moving the image up or down in the plane so you can make sure it all lines up vertically as well.


With everything in line and in focus I put a little bit of thread locker on the screws so they don't move, now I want to check that the rangefinder is correct and that the lens is in focus as well. In order to check focus I have this bit of ground glass, which is frosted on one side.


This gives the lens something to throw an image on to, so with a bit of blu-tac we can see what would be projected on the film plane with ease.


With this in place I got out a loupe and adjusted the position of the front element of the lens to bring that distant power pole into sharp focus:


Then I bought the camera inside, focused on a close object and measure the distance to the film plane. If the rangefinder, focus scale and image all align in focus then my jobs done, and luckily nothing needed adjusting. I chose the handles on my closet for this as they're very easy to focus on and have strong vertical lines for the rangefinder.


Lastly the film chamber was pretty beat up, and internal reflections are no good for photography, so these needed a touch up with a bit of enamel paint.






I also did some cosmetic repainting off camera to touch up some numbers and grooves. This is the frame counter and it was pretty beat up, looks great now!


All done! The last thing to do it to shoot a roll of film and see that it's all light tight. I'm out of 120 film at the moment but I've got 20 rolls coming next week so up next will be some photos from this camera. Both of these cameras take the same film, the Plaubel is from 1936 while the Fuji was made up until 2001.

Megabound fucked around with this message at 04:27 on Sep 5, 2021

Carth Dookie
Jan 28, 2013



I pulled apart a early 1960s omega constellation watch a few years ago.






Fortunately I did it in a watchmakers shop where 2 guys with a combined 80 years or so of experience could stop me from messing up the rebuild after all the parts were cleaned.


Pre clean:








Post clean and lubricated













Eventually I am going to make a project of restoring this Seiko 6139 chronograph from the 70s which will be MUCH harder since I'll be doing it at home, unguided.





Worst case scenario is I gently caress it up or it's not savable and I keep at as a parts watch to keep my 2 good examples alive for longer


Carth Dookie fucked around with this message at 05:27 on Sep 6, 2021

Megabound
Oct 20, 2012



Watches are next level, seriously cool stuff.

Carth Dookie
Jan 28, 2013



Megabound posted:

Watches are next level, seriously cool stuff.

You'd probably find it similar to your camera stuff. The scale does make it more challenging, so you have to be good with tweezers and magnifying tools.

Arsenic Lupin
Apr 11, 2012

This particularly rapid unintelligible patter isn't generally heard, and if it is, it doesn't matter.





Megabound posted:

All done! The last thing to do it to shoot a roll of film and see that it's all light tight. I'm out of 120 film at the moment but I've got 20 rolls coming next week so up next will be some photos from this camera. Both of these cameras take the same film, the Plaubel is from 1936 while the Fuji was made up until 2001.

:perfect:

Thanks for that post! It was educational.

Trabant
Nov 26, 2011

All systems nominal.


Amazing posts Megabound and Carth Dookie!

My restoration of rusty hammers so far isn't quite as satisfying as I had hoped, but here goes anyway:

Stock I'll be using: cherry, ash, maple (for the third hammer head which arrived in the meantime)



Turned to round-ish and marked where the diameter changes (based on another handle I like):



Turned to the right shape but still cylindrical:



Now comes the tricky part: off-axis turning. Did this to get a oval handle and it was my first time doing so. You're turning a lot of air in the process and there's a lot of switching between the different positions (which were about 1/8" from center). It's not truly terrible, but it is moderately unnatural when you're used to on-center turning.:

https://i.imgur.com/jXqk8zf.mp4

After sanding on the lathe to 220 (also weird when off-center):



And with a couple of coats of Danish oil applied:





The unsatisfying parts:

(1) It doesn't look as balanced as I had hoped. I managed a pretty good approximation to the handle I like, but the head here is much smaller so the handle isn't as well-proportioned.
(2) I somehow lost the small wedge of walnut I wanted to use to set the head. Now I have to go back to the makerspace just to make a tiny, 1" x 1/2" piece so I can finish this mother :shepicide:

I have two more to make, and I'm kinda toying with the idea of just remaking this one too but that's TBD.

Megabound
Oct 20, 2012



Off centre turning looks scary and wrong. Nice stuff!

Megabound
Oct 20, 2012



Here's the payoff. I shot a test roll in the Plaubel today, here's the developed roll


And some final images






I am extremely happy with this, and I can't wait to get out and shoot it more!

Carth Dookie
Jan 28, 2013



That's rad. Particularly like the first tree branches one. There's something about film black and white cameras.

ynohtna
Feb 16, 2007

How does that sound?



Illegal Hen

Incredible work!

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Trabant
Nov 26, 2011

All systems nominal.



Yo, that's some art.

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