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infrared35
Jan 12, 2005

border patrol qt


Plaster Town Cop

Okay, this one is a little long but bear with me.

Will Petty is a driving force in the firearms training world, with a data-driven approach for development and burning desire to make sure that his tactics work well when opposed. To that end, his predominant contribution to the training world is Vehicle CQB, or gunfighting in and around vehicles. It's not just limited to law enforcement or military. If you can find a Centrifuge Training open enrollment VCQB class in your area, I highly recommend it. It's not cheap, but it's fantastic training. Make sure you have your fundamentals nailed down tight before you go in, though. You should already be able to move safely in a three-dimensional environment with a loaded firearm, and be religious about applying the four rules of firearms safety. You should have decent, tested gear that you know how to operate without having to think about it. And you need some kind of documented foundational handgun training above and beyond a concealed carry permit class.

As an LEO, to become a VCQB instructor for your agency you need to attend an intense four-day training course ("every day is leg day in VCQB") and pass every drill, including the instructor's qual course at the end. Here is that course.

Facility: You will need a shooting range that will let you safely shoot a handgun from standing, squatting, kneeling, and prone. Remember to watch your angles on the berm so you're not sending rounds over it (or into the ceiling if shooting indoors), especially when shooting from prone. You may need to mount the target low on the carrier to help mitigate that risk.

Target: A simple 8.5x11" piece of paper, folded in half the long way so it's "skinny", and placed vertically on a target backer like a sans serif capital I.

Distance: Seven yards for all stages.

Gear: A handgun that holds at least six rounds, an appropriate holster, and twenty rounds of ammo. Shot timer, par timer, or turning targets.

Time limit: Five seconds on every stage.

Course of fire:

1) Draw and fire six rounds in five seconds
2) Draw, move to squatting, and fire four rounds in five seconds
3) Draw, move to kneeling, and fire four rounds in five seconds
4) Draw, move to right side urban prone, and fire three rounds in five seconds
5) Draw, move to left side urban prone, and fire three rounds in five seconds

Techniques: All stages start from standing, with the gun holstered. Hopefully standing needs no explanation. Squatting is just lowering your center of gravity as though you were using a low piece of cover (such as shooting over the hood of a car). Kneeling probably doesn't need a lot of explanation though there is a way to do it while minimizing risk of injury to your knee. The foot that's on the same side as the knee that's going to the ground? Turn the foot way out to the side as you lower yourself down. That rotates your leg a bit and makes it so you're not smashing down right on your patella. It also offers a little more stability than a "conventional" kneeling stance:



And the last technique is right side and left side urban prone. Popularized by Magpul Dynamics, the technique has its roots in the need to shoot underneath a piece of cover such as a car. I don't recommend doing a GIS of it because there are far more photos of people loving it up than there are of people doing it correctly. The point is you want to get your eyes and gun as close to the ground as possible. Urban prone does that by having you lying on your left or right side. To lower your body and head even further, you straighten your "ground side" leg as if you were standing, and you rotate your "sky side" leg forward until that knee is touching the ground, and that leg is bent so your foot is out of your field of fire. I like to bring the "sky side" foot right back so it's touching the "ground side" leg.

Instructions for righties: To get into right side urban prone, first you draw your handgun, then take your support side hand and put it across your body, under your right arm, palm facing to the right, as if to tell someone to your right to "stop". Move to kneeling, then lower yourself to your right side using that support hand to catch your weight. Once you're on the ground, get your legs situated properly. Rest your head on your "ground side" shoulder and get your shots on target. To get to left side urban prone from standing, after you draw, take your support hand, make a fist and draw your elbow in close to your body while bending your arm in a "YES!" gesture. Go to kneeling and then lower yourself to your left side using that tucked arm as a cushion. Get your legs situated, then rest your head on your left shoulder and get your shots.

This photo is a decent example of right side urban prone. Note the straight right leg, the bent left leg with knee touching the ground, the firearm as low as it can get, and the head resting on the right shoulder.



With a rifle you have to do a shoulder bump or other transition to get the gun low to the ground when shooting left side urban prone as a righty, for example, but with a handgun there's no need.

Having said all that, I know there are people with mobility issues, so if it takes you longer to get into position, that's fine for this drill. I just want people to try out some positional shooting, especially if they've never done it before, and they can do it safely... and if their range allows it.

Divisions: airgun, rimfire, and centerfire. This drill is more about the movement and positional shooting than it is about the type of gun. I will differentiate those who were able to shoot the qual normally versus those who had to modify it to fit their range facilities or rules.

Passing: You have to get 18 out of 20 hits on paper to pass.

If your range doesn't allow kneeling or prone: Shoot the standing section with the normal five second par time, shoot the squatting section once with the normal par time of five seconds and once at a four-second par time, and then either move your vertically oriented target to a horizontal orientation or post a second target in a horizontal orientation for the urban prone sections. Those, you will shoot both stages from a standing position with a three second par time.

If your range doesn't allow rapid fire or prone: shoot the same target at the same distance as the regular qual, using a vertical target for the first three stages and a horizontal target for the last two stages. Don't worry about the times.

If your range doesn't allow drawing from a holster: Pick the gun up off a table and use the par times as above.

If your range allows positional shooting but you don't want to stress about hitting the time limits, give it a try without a timer, or run the timer and just note how long it took you.

If you want to do it with a rifle, the course of fire is the same. Again, watch your angles and make sure you're not sending rounds over the berm, especially from the prone position.

DO NOT DO THIS DRILL IF YOU HAVE ANY DOUBT ABOUT ANY ASPECT OF SAFETY. Run it dry if you can, and check your angles. If you need to modify it for safety reasons, modify it. Just tell us how you shot it and what you learned.

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knuthgrush
Jun 25, 2008

Be brave; clench fists.



Well I guess I'm gonna have to find a shot timer and go to the range when nobody else is there so they don't see me flailing about on the ground. They see that enough when I shoot matches.

Gray Stormy
Dec 19, 2006



This is a legit skill test.

I really hope I can get out and run this over the weekend. Those par times are TIGHT.

infrared35
Jan 12, 2005

border patrol qt


Plaster Town Cop

Gray Stormy posted:

This is a legit skill test.

I really hope I can get out and run this over the weekend. Those par times are TIGHT.

Yuuup.

Last time I ran it, I was fine until urban prone. I made the time limits but threw more than half of those shots out.

knuthgrush
Jun 25, 2008

Be brave; clench fists.



well i'm not posting photos because this was terrible. suffice to say that i got about one to two rounds on target in each position and that's it. guess i have a lot of practice to do, especially with rapid fire.

also laying down and shooting like that was new to me, especially with a pistol. it was definitely bizarre and i felt like a total goober at the range but i've seen worse there, so whatever.

thanks for posting another drill!

infrared35
Jan 12, 2005

border patrol qt


Plaster Town Cop

knuthgrush posted:

well i'm not posting photos because this was terrible. suffice to say that i got about one to two rounds on target in each position and that's it. guess i have a lot of practice to do, especially with rapid fire.

also laying down and shooting like that was new to me, especially with a pistol. it was definitely bizarre and i felt like a total goober at the range but i've seen worse there, so whatever.

thanks for posting another drill!

Thanks for giving it a go! I still need to get out and run it a couple times. I want to get at least one passing score on it. :sweatdrop:

The Automator
Jan 16, 2009


A red dot would really shine on this drill

infrared35
Jan 12, 2005

border patrol qt


Plaster Town Cop

The Automator posted:

A red dot would really shine on this drill

As long as you know your offset at seven yards!

I mean, realistically you're still on paper if you aim dead center. But if you tend to push your shots low (as I do), then that offset makes a bigger difference.

infrared35
Jan 12, 2005

border patrol qt


Plaster Town Cop

Double post to showcase my personal shame. This is from last month when I shot it cold during another class.

knuthgrush
Jun 25, 2008

Be brave; clench fists.



i should note that while i only got one to two shots on target per position, the other shots weren't missing, over the berm, through some guy's car door, etc. they were all at least *near* the target. recoil management is a skill i need to work on i think. i believe probably my first and second shots did well and then everything went to poo poo from there.

infrared35
Jan 12, 2005

border patrol qt


Plaster Town Cop

knuthgrush posted:

i should note that while i only got one to two shots on target per position, the other shots weren't missing, over the berm, through some guy's car door, etc. they were all at least *near* the target. recoil management is a skill i need to work on i think. i believe probably my first and second shots did well and then everything went to poo poo from there.

:hfive:

Same. I threw five shots, all on the urban prone stages, but they weren't off by more than a couple inches.

Tyro
Nov 10, 2009


Hmm I have a range day at the end of the week, might need to convince my buddy we need to do this

infrared35
Jan 12, 2005

border patrol qt


Plaster Town Cop

Tyro posted:

Hmm I have a range day at the end of the week, might need to convince my buddy we need to do this

:getin:

We had our quarterly instructors' meeting and quals today and I got everyone to try it... after I showed them how to do urban prone. Shot timer was dead so it doesn't really count, but I got 19/20 hits. I felt like I was hustling, but there's really no way to know for sure.

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Tyro
Nov 10, 2009


Nice! I misspoke, I'm hitting the range closer to the end of the month, not this week. But my buddy is game to try it with me.

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