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Scratch Monkey
Oct 25, 2010

👰Proč bychom se netěšili🥰když nám Pán Bůh🙌🏻zdraví dá💪?
Neat

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bird food bathtub
Aug 9, 2003

College Slice
What was the brainwormed train of thought on banning tattoos? Never figured that one out and it felt like it was among some of the dumber, more pointless things the Army did....which is a pretty tall bar to clear. I always imagined it was some stuffy rear end in a top hat that didn't like "kids these days" or some poo poo, so glad to see it getting worked on especially for people who have a cultural reason.

Bonus points if it makes some other stuffy rear end in a top hat angry about "Kinder, gentler Army these days!" Every time I hear someone whine about that it improves my mood.

not caring here
Feb 22, 2012

blazemastah 2 dry 4 u
Like all the other bullshit, it is always about control.

Icon Of Sin
Dec 26, 2008



Controversial opinion, likely to explode the heads of staff officers and SNCOs alike:

soldiers are people too

bulletsponge13
Apr 28, 2010

Icon Of Sin posted:

Controversial opinion, likely to explode the heads of staff officers and SNCOs alike:

soldiers are people too

*Citation needed per CSM

Vahakyla
May 3, 2013
Most CSMs would have no idea what ”a citation” is.

bird food bathtub
Aug 9, 2003

College Slice

Vahakyla posted:

Most CSMs would have no idea what ”a citation” is.

Isn't that the thing they have MPs give out for not being in full battle rattle at the commissary?

Itchy_Grundle
Feb 22, 2003

Vahakyla posted:

Most CSMs would have no idea what ”a citation” is.

Some kinda Chevy, right?

spacetoaster
Feb 10, 2014

bird food bathtub posted:

Isn't that the thing they have MPs give out for not being in full battle rattle at the commissary?

No, we give those to VERY angry staff officers when explaining that they aren't allowed their own special parking spot outside of HQ.

Mustang
Jun 18, 2006

“We don’t really know where this goes — and I’m not sure we really care.”
Assigned parking spots are a trick, everyone knows where you park and notice when your car isn't there.

Shamming is infinitely easier when people can't just look out the window and see if you're here or not.

spacetoaster
Feb 10, 2014

Just buy a second car to leave in your parking spot all day.

Dream Weaver
Jan 23, 2007
Sweat Baby, sweat baby

Mustang posted:

Assigned parking spots are a trick, everyone knows where you park and notice when your car isn't there.

Shamming is infinitely easier when people can't just look out the window and see if you're here or not.

This is why you have a spare car and you just leave it there. And a spare hat which you just leave on your desk. Maybe I've hit peak field grade brain fog though.

bird food bathtub
Aug 9, 2003

College Slice
Spare car is a bit much, but I never made it past sham shield money. Learned from the pros though, our warrant had the spare hat and a ring of fake house/car keys to put in it. Dude could ghost an entire day at will, finish whatever needed to be done, when it needed to be done, and nobody would notice.

madeintaipei
Jul 13, 2012

spacetoaster posted:

Just buy a second car to leave in your parking spot all day.

My uncle was stationed at Alameda for a while during the 80s. There was a small fleet of four identical brown Chevy Novas that made their way on base sometime in the early 70s and kinda never left. If you really, really wanted a car, and didn't mind wrenching on it a lot, you waited until someone rotated out and gave them a few $100 bills. Wash, rinse, repeat.

At any one time, there would be two of them parked outside the shop, one broken, and out and about in town. This led to some confusion with visitors and newcomers,

"Hey, is Sims here?"

"Nah. Why?"

"I owe him money and his car's outside."

"That's my car."

"Well, then what does Sims drive?"

"Same car."

"No. Which car is his?"

"Same. Car. Sims, Roberts, Gigliotti, and I have the same car."

"??? Nevermind, I'll be back later."

Anyways, I came here to ask a question. Has anyone here been instructed in the use of, been issued, or otherwise used the M67 Recoiless Rifle? Wikipedia and a few other random sources say the system was used by the US Army until the 2010s, which seems odd to me considering how old the ammo must have been unless they got newer stuff from S. Korea, who still use them.

Also, if an outdated but still useful piece of equipment gets put back into service, how does training on it work out? Read the manual and figure it out? Ask the oldest person you can find? Form an official training cadre and have them disseminate info? Ask Quora?

Icon Of Sin
Dec 26, 2008



madeintaipei posted:

My uncle was stationed at Alameda for a while during the 80s. There was a small fleet of four identical brown Chevy Novas that made their way on base sometime in the early 70s and kinda never left. If you really, really wanted a car, and didn't mind wrenching on it a lot, you waited until someone rotated out and gave them a few $100 bills. Wash, rinse, repeat.

At any one time, there would be two of them parked outside the shop, one broken, and out and about in town. This led to some confusion with visitors and newcomers,

"Hey, is Sims here?"

"Nah. Why?"

"I owe him money and his car's outside."

"That's my car."

"Well, then what does Sims drive?"

"Same car."

"No. Which car is his?"

"Same. Car. Sims, Roberts, Gigliotti, and I have the same car."

"??? Nevermind, I'll be back later."

Anyways, I came here to ask a question. Has anyone here been instructed in the use of, been issued, or otherwise used the M67 Recoiless Rifle? Wikipedia and a few other random sources say the system was used by the US Army until the 2010s, which seems odd to me considering how old the ammo must have been unless they got newer stuff from S. Korea, who still use them.

Also, if an outdated but still useful piece of equipment gets put back into service, how does training on it work out? Read the manual and figure it out? Ask the oldest person you can find? Form an official training cadre and have them disseminate info? Ask Quora?

Those would mostly be good ideas, so the army will not have anything to do with them. “Kludge your way through it, kill/maim a few enlisted as you do so” will probably be closer to what would actually happen.

vuk83
Oct 9, 2012

madeintaipei posted:

My uncle was stationed at Alameda for a while during the 80s. There was a small fleet of four identical brown Chevy Novas that made their way on base sometime in the early 70s and kinda never left. If you really, really wanted a car, and didn't mind wrenching on it a lot, you waited until someone rotated out and gave them a few $100 bills. Wash, rinse, repeat.

At any one time, there would be two of them parked outside the shop, one broken, and out and about in town. This led to some confusion with visitors and newcomers,

"Hey, is Sims here?"

"Nah. Why?"

"I owe him money and his car's outside."

"That's my car."

"Well, then what does Sims drive?"

"Same car."

"No. Which car is his?"

"Same. Car. Sims, Roberts, Gigliotti, and I have the same car."

"??? Nevermind, I'll be back later."

Anyways, I came here to ask a question. Has anyone here been instructed in the use of, been issued, or otherwise used the M67 Recoiless Rifle? Wikipedia and a few other random sources say the system was used by the US Army until the 2010s, which seems odd to me considering how old the ammo must have been unless they got newer stuff from S. Korea, who still use them.

Also, if an outdated but still useful piece of equipment gets put back into service, how does training on it work out? Read the manual and figure it out? Ask the oldest person you can find? Form an official training cadre and have them disseminate info? Ask Quora?

Aren’t army manuals relatively exhaustive and thorough? But put some experienced NCOs on it and form train the trainers?

A.o.D.
Jan 15, 2006

vuk83 posted:

Aren’t army manuals relatively exhaustive and thorough? But put some experienced NCOs on it and form train the trainers?

They're pretty thorough, but best used in conjunction with someone who is experienced with whatever subject the manual covers.

Steezo
Jun 16, 2003

A.o.D. posted:

They're pretty thorough, but best used in conjunction with someone who is experienced with whatever subject the manual covers.

Look if you're not injuring a few joes each month you're not training enough.

bird food bathtub
Aug 9, 2003

College Slice
Army technical manuals are pretty good, just kind of dense and hard to internalize until you get in to the right mindset. They're very thorough, but that thoroughness ends up making them a solid chore to get through and internalize just by their nature. Someone who knows what they're doing can teach you 'Do A, B, and C'. A t.m. has you look at section 4, table 3 to find the different locations in the manual for the reference materials covering procedures A, B and C.

A.o.D.
Jan 15, 2006
As an example, the HMMWV 20 level maintenance manual instructs you to support the starter when removing it. That's all well and good, and a strong, young soldier can easily do that as they loosen the bolts and drop the starter. What it doesn't tell you is that you really need an extra set of hands or some kind of support to easily line things back up when you want to reinstall it. That thing is heavy and only gets heavier when you're trying to put it back on from underneath the truck.

madeintaipei
Jul 13, 2012

A.o.D. posted:

As an example, the HMMWV 20 level maintenance manual instructs you to support the starter when removing it. That's all well and good, and a strong, young soldier can easily do that as they loosen the bolts and drop the starter. What it doesn't tell you is that you really need an extra set of hands or some kind of support to easily line things back up when you want to reinstall it. That thing is heavy and only gets heavier when you're trying to put it back on from underneath the truck.

Noted!

I've worked on the DD engines that went into earlier HMMWVs, but in civilian Chevy pickups (not CUCVs). God, they suck. Everything wilts and falls apart from the heat, and it's all fiddly poo poo like fuel distribution lines and electronics, with their own badly run wires and badly placed controllers.

I've got them running again, but for almost as much money in parts as a crate engine would cost. "Easy" to work on, and the Chilton's manual details exactly what you need to do, but a pain in the rear end when they start to fail (which they do, a lot, frequently, with age.)

That said, I've worked on those engines in bigger vehicles and pieces of equipment where the cooling is better and the placement of electronics is, too. Much the same as the 6.0L V8 Powerstroke, packaging is a motherfucker.

HMMWV mechanic sounds like a lovely job, even with every manual, diagram, and part at your fingertips.

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A.o.D.
Jan 15, 2006

madeintaipei posted:

Noted!

I've worked on the DD engines that went into earlier HMMWVs, but in civilian Chevy pickups (not CUCVs). God, they suck. Everything wilts and falls apart from the heat, and it's all fiddly poo poo like fuel distribution lines and electronics, with their own badly run wires and badly placed controllers.

I've got them running again, but for almost as much money in parts as a crate engine would cost. "Easy" to work on, and the Chilton's manual details exactly what you need to do, but a pain in the rear end when they start to fail (which they do, a lot, frequently, with age.)

That said, I've worked on those engines in bigger vehicles and pieces of equipment where the cooling is better and the placement of electronics is, too. Much the same as the 6.0L V8 Powerstroke, packaging is a motherfucker.

HMMWV mechanic sounds like a lovely job, even with every manual, diagram, and part at your fingertips.

I didn't hate it. There's plenty of room to work on them, and being a 63G (a nonexistent MOS these days) I actually understood how the fuel and electrical systems work, so I could troubleshoot them rather than taking a scattershot parts changing approach to repairing them. It helps that I was in pre GWOT, so I didn't deal with vehicles that were loaded down with armor and modifications, so the things were doing the jobs they were actually designed for.

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