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theflyingexecutive
Apr 22, 2007



Hana Dammit posted:

I finally finished this horribly cute bear hoodie for a friend. He works at a recycled home improvement store and so this wonderfully dusty fur's origins will forever remain a mystery, which given the texture and wear of the fabric, was not any time remotely recent. I lined it (for his own protection.... the wrong side of the fur was gnarls) with a red courderoy table cloth, also recycled. It broke 12 needles and may have given me a sinus infection, but here you have the bear hoodie


This particular friend happens to live in a cabin without running water in the middle of the woods, and so I anticipate feeling at least partially responsible when he is accidentally shot while biking past his neighbor's house.

WOW, that is amazing.

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Nettle Soup
Jan 30, 2010

Oh, and Jones was there too.


Hana Dammit posted:

I finally finished this horribly cute bear hoodie for a friend. He works at a recycled home improvement store and so this wonderfully dusty fur's origins will forever remain a mystery, which given the texture and wear of the fabric, was not any time remotely recent. I lined it (for his own protection.... the wrong side of the fur was gnarls) with a red courderoy table cloth, also recycled. It broke 12 needles and may have given me a sinus infection, but here you have the bear hoodie


This particular friend happens to live in a cabin without running water in the middle of the woods, and so I anticipate feeling at least partially responsible when he is accidentally shot while biking past his neighbor's house.

That is the best thing I have ever seen. If I passed it in a shop, I would be sorely tempted to buy it.

Nettle Soup fucked around with this message at Feb 19, 2012 around 17:56

Hana Dammit
Nov 29, 2004

Punch-drunk tears of a clone.

wow, thanks you guys. I've gotten such crazy unexpected positive responses to the bear hoodie, it blew my mind! If it weren't just short of torture for me to make them, I'd be pumping em out like hot cakes. Maybe if I used nicer, less dusty fur it wouldn't be so awful, that and a hermetically sealed stray fur-containment chamber. I'd still probably wanna charge like $160-$200 a pop though because the only fun part of making this was the constant pubic wig humor having huge clumps of fur around leads to... so not exactly worth it.


Well in other events, I've come here to ask you all a question about attaching collars! You see, I am making a blouse

and despite my supernatural fabric foresight, I have yet to come up with a clean, visible seam-free way to attach collars. I've done it a couple of times before and just crappily hid my raw edge with a poorly planned topstich, which did not look good. I'm not opposed to a top stitch (my new plan involves them even), just putting over the top of the whole thing seems wrong. Too wrong. I made a small sketch to illustrate my point just so we're clear


AND SO here is my new plan (unless someone replies to this thread with a better answer within one hour) involves carefully ironing the raw edges of the collar INSIDE the collar and then carefully sandwiching the top of the blouse in it and stitching the whole thing down like so and ironing the hell out of it


It seems like there should be an easier or perhapse a slightly more normal method to doing this, so any tips would be greatly appreciated.

Hana Dammit fucked around with this message at Feb 20, 2012 around 19:28

Stultus Maximus
Dec 21, 2009

Whenever I hit "r" in my address bar, Raine Dog comes up. Goddammit.


e: n/m, Peter Pan collars may use some other construction I know nothing about

Stultus Maximus fucked around with this message at Feb 20, 2012 around 19:39

Valdara
May 12, 2003

burn, pillage, ORGANIZE!

My soon-to-be-mother-in-law knows that I sew and gave me an old piece of fabric that she had for me to make something awesome out of it. It is a beautiful, 8'x10' piece of linen with a circle motif centered on it. The problem is that I don't want to cut it up senselessly or waste any of the beautiful pattern. It's not repeating, just one big panel. The only things I can think of are table cloth or wall-hanging, and neither are particularly appealing.

Here is a picture of it draped over my crafting table. Any thoughts on what I could possibly make from it?


Edit: The more I look at it, the more I'm thinking skirt. Cut out the middle bit big enough for an elastic waist and make a pillow or applique it on something, cut out the length to reach the ground, and have a gorgeous skirt. I always, always fight the hoarding tendency of "saving it for something awesome" and rarely actually get things made. I'm also tempted to wait and make this skirt to wear at my wedding. I don't plan on wearing a traditional wedding dress, and this would be much more meaningful than just about anything else ever.

Valdara fucked around with this message at Feb 20, 2012 around 21:15

Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


Hana Dammit posted:

collars

I usually sew raw edges of front bodice and under collar together, then fold the yoke raw edge under to cover the over collar and then stitch on the crease of the front bodice/under collar seam. If I had a way to draw it it would make so much more sense
If you don't have a yoke, you'd see the front bodice/under collar the same way, but then you'd have to turn the raw edge of the over collar inside, and either seam-stitch or hand stitch it closed.

If it doesn't make sense, I'm sorry, English isn't my first language in sewing :/

Hana Dammit
Nov 29, 2004

Punch-drunk tears of a clone.

/\/\/\/\ ughhh that is such a good idea!!! I am going to try it next time, or perhapse later today if my dissatisfaction at what I ended up doing gets any greater...

So after that post I decided to follow my heart and get stoned out of my gourd. When I came to an hour later, the collar was sewn on, all my button holes were finished and 4/6 buttons attached! I am not 100% pleased with the turn out of my collar. The method I used was illustrated in my previous post, but I think I am just generally dissatisfied with the shape? Or something, I can't put my finger on it yet. Before I do anything crazy though my model is gonna come try it on and maybe it'll look better...

Gonna spend some time in the future working on collars more, they're so neat when executed properly but it's just not a concept ive fully grasped yet...

Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


Hana Dammit posted:

/\/\/\/\ ughhh that is such a good idea!!! I am going to try it next time, or perhapse later today if my dissatisfaction at what I ended up doing gets any greater...

So after that post I decided to follow my heart and get stoned out of my gourd. When I came to an hour later, the collar was sewn on, all my button holes were finished and 4/6 buttons attached! I am not 100% pleased with the turn out of my collar. The method I used was illustrated in my previous post, but I think I am just generally dissatisfied with the shape? Or something, I can't put my finger on it yet. Before I do anything crazy though my model is gonna come try it on and maybe it'll look better...

Gonna spend some time in the future working on collars more, they're so neat when executed properly but it's just not a concept ive fully grasped yet...

Looks good to me, from what I can see! Collar trickiness is often about attaching them and getting crisp points.

For attaching I usually go with a little golden rule and sew up to about two-three cm before the... I don't know what to call it, the seam line ?(where the seam will be on the finished product). Gives you space to work with attaching collar seams and helps prevent goofy bulk if you don't have a yoke to just tuck the seam into.
Pointy points though, I sorta cheat. When I sew the point I slip a bit of basting thread around the sewing needle and sew around it. So when I'm ready to turn it out front, after cutting down the selvedge, I just pull the strings and voila, perfect points. Cheating makes sewing fun

Pheeets
Sep 17, 2004

Are ya gonna come quietly, or am I gonna have to muss ya up?

Valdara posted:

My soon-to-be-mother-in-law knows that I sew and gave me an old piece of fabric that she had for me to make something awesome out of it. It is a beautiful, 8'x10' piece of linen with a circle motif centered on it. The problem is that I don't want to cut it up senselessly or waste any of the beautiful pattern. It's not repeating, just one big panel. The only things I can think of are table cloth or wall-hanging, and neither are particularly appealing.

Here is a picture of it draped over my crafting table. Any thoughts on what I could possibly make from it?


Edit: The more I look at it, the more I'm thinking skirt. Cut out the middle bit big enough for an elastic waist and make a pillow or applique it on something, cut out the length to reach the ground, and have a gorgeous skirt. I always, always fight the hoarding tendency of "saving it for something awesome" and rarely actually get things made. I'm also tempted to wait and make this skirt to wear at my wedding. I don't plan on wearing a traditional wedding dress, and this would be much more meaningful than just about anything else ever.


That really is a gorgeous piece of fabric, it looks Russian or something. My first thought was "duvet cover" but it would also make a great skirt. I like your idea of using the center part that you would have to cut out to make a pillow or applique.

My only advice is to not make a literal circle skirt without checking out how voluminous it would be - you might have to actually cut into the fabric (maintaing the circular design of course) to make tapered panels to fit your frame, rather than have a huge billowy circle skirt. Unless that's what you're after, of course.

Another advantage of cutting it a bit and tailoring it is: hey! more scrap pieces to play around with (maybe make pockets for the skirt, or make placemats etc).

Whatever you end up doing with it, you must post pictures. I'm totally jealous of your great future mother-in-law and I hope she has more awesome stuff hidden in her lair.

Stultus Maximus
Dec 21, 2009

Whenever I hit "r" in my address bar, Raine Dog comes up. Goddammit.


Valdara posted:

My soon-to-be-mother-in-law knows that I sew and gave me an old piece of fabric that she had for me to make something awesome out of it. It is a beautiful, 8'x10' piece of linen with a circle motif centered on it. The problem is that I don't want to cut it up senselessly or waste any of the beautiful pattern. It's not repeating, just one big panel. The only things I can think of are table cloth or wall-hanging, and neither are particularly appealing.

Here is a picture of it draped over my crafting table. Any thoughts on what I could possibly make from it?


Edit: The more I look at it, the more I'm thinking skirt. Cut out the middle bit big enough for an elastic waist and make a pillow or applique it on something, cut out the length to reach the ground, and have a gorgeous skirt. I always, always fight the hoarding tendency of "saving it for something awesome" and rarely actually get things made. I'm also tempted to wait and make this skirt to wear at my wedding. I don't plan on wearing a traditional wedding dress, and this would be much more meaningful than just about anything else ever.

It would look great as a sarong.

Eponine
Apr 2, 2007

Liberte
Egalite
Beyonce


It seems almost terrible to cut it apart. Do you quilt? You could make a kind of muted front out of just strips even (greige, anyone?) and handquilt the pattern. It would be kind of a cool reversal of quilting, where the pieced part is the less fun part and it could also be a stealthily fun throw

Comrade Quack
Jun 6, 2006
Witty closing remarks have been replaced by massive head trauma and general stupidity.

Bed canopy?

fanpantstic
Jul 30, 2010

inner breathlessness
outer restlessness


There's a pattern sale on at BMV right now if anyone is looking to stock up on cheap patterns.

I was about to spend $11 on a basic leggings pattern, but it is only $2. Perfect!




Hana Dammit - That is super cute blouse!

Cross_
Aug 22, 2008


Brigg posted:




It's late and all, but those pieces deserve some
Nice, clean construction!

mrs pooglyfoop
Feb 2, 2012


i am having the most horrible time trying to find videos, or info on how to load a front loading sewing machine with the bobbin! the video i found goes as far as how to wind the bobbin, but loading it back in is what im having issues with. help! its an older machine. jeans machine, by white.

Brigg
Dec 27, 2006
Master of all things orange.

does it have a bobbin case? if so, the bobbin goes in there, then you pull the tab on the case which holds the bobbin in place. Line up the case and insert it into the circular area that holds the hook. If you aren't pulling the swing tab on the case it might not be able to be inserted.

If its a drop feed you pretty much just put the bobbin in, and pull the thread until it fits into the depression.

mrs pooglyfoop
Feb 2, 2012


Brigg posted:

does it have a bobbin case? if so, the bobbin goes in there, then you pull the tab on the case which holds the bobbin in place. Line up the case and insert it into the circular area that holds the hook. If you aren't pulling the swing tab on the case it might not be able to be inserted.

If its a drop feed you pretty much just put the bobbin in, and pull the thread until it fits into the depression.

i put it in, make sure the it turns clock wise. but, the bobbin doesnt seem to have a little tab on it like every other one i have saw online. maybe im loading it backwards? i'll take a picture and post.

mrs pooglyfoop
Feb 2, 2012


mrs pooglyfoop posted:

i put it in, make sure the it turns clock wise. but, the bobbin doesnt seem to have a little tab on it like every other one i have saw online. maybe im loading it backwards? i'll take a picture and post.

Brigg
Dec 27, 2006
Master of all things orange.

try that slot on the bottom, under the bobbin. the thread might need to slide in there. The basic idea is that the hook just needs to grab it.. it almost looks like youre missing something though. I cant imagine the sewing hook being exposed like that, am I just missing something here?

Rufus En Fuego
Oct 19, 2011

HOUSE BARK

"Winter is Potato"

Yeah, the bobbin case.

Do you have one of these? http://thru-hiker.com/projects/bobbin_basics.php

Rufus En Fuego fucked around with this message at Feb 22, 2012 around 06:08

Brigg
Dec 27, 2006
Master of all things orange.

yeah, thats exactly what i have on two of my machines.

mrs pooglyfoop
Feb 2, 2012


Rufus En Fuego posted:

Yeah, the bobbin case.

Do you have one of these? http://thru-hiker.com/projects/bobbin_basics.php


yeah, it's down in the machine with the bobbin. for the life of me i can't understand how it all fits together. i had a top loading one and it was no problem! i'll upload more pictures of what is on the inside in a bit.

Blakles
Mar 10, 2008

I have lived a great deal among grown-ups. I have seen them intimately, close at hand. And that hasnt much improved my opinion of them.

I have a machine with front loading bobbin. You basically take the bobbin case out, put the bobbin inside the bobbin case, lift the little handle on the bobbin case, then insert the bobbin case back into the machine. Here's a little diagram:



Does that help?

Pheeets
Sep 17, 2004

Are ya gonna come quietly, or am I gonna have to muss ya up?

mrs pooglyfoop posted:

yeah, it's down in the machine with the bobbin. for the life of me i can't understand how it all fits together. i had a top loading one and it was no problem! i'll upload more pictures of what is on the inside in a bit.

If the bobbin case is in the machine in your pic, you may be loading it in backwards. You shouldn't be able to see the actual bobbin when it's loaded correctly, just the outside of the bobbin case.

It's not the bobbin that has the tab, it's the bobbin case, fwiw.

: ^^^ that diagram above it pretty explicit, hope it helps!

Pheeets fucked around with this message at Feb 22, 2012 around 20:10

Rufus En Fuego
Oct 19, 2011

HOUSE BARK

"Winter is Potato"

mrs pooglyfoop posted:

yeah, it's down in the machine with the bobbin. for the life of me i can't understand how it all fits together. i had a top loading one and it was no problem! i'll upload more pictures of what is on the inside in a bit.

Top-loading machines don't have the bobbin case that we're talking about - the bobbin case is an extra part that holds the bobbin in place in front-loading machines. Top-loaders don't have it because gravity keeps the bobbin in place.

Valdara
May 12, 2003

burn, pillage, ORGANIZE!

Is there a consensus on the best way to use a multi-size pattern? Does it make more sense to cut out the biggest size and then fool with sizing down to what you need so that you can get more use out of the pattern, or should I just say "screw it" and cut it down to size and use the drat pattern in the size I need?

clarion ravenwood
Aug 5, 2005



quote:

Valdara posted:

My soon-to-be-mother-in-law knows that I sew and gave me an old piece of fabric that she had for me to make something awesome out of it. It is a beautiful, 8'x10' piece of linen with a circle motif centered on it. The problem is that I don't want to cut it up senselessly or waste any of the beautiful pattern. It's not repeating, just one big panel. The only things I can think of are table cloth or wall-hanging, and neither are particularly appealing.

Here is a picture of it draped over my crafting table. Any thoughts on what I could possibly make from it?

A skirt would be lovely - but as I'm obsessed with them I have to suggest a quilt. A wholecloth quilt would be stunning - just layer that up with some batting and a backing and either hand or machine quilt it!

Then again I do have problems cutting up some of the more precious pieces of fabric I own.

clarion ravenwood fucked around with this message at Feb 23, 2012 around 20:44

Cross_
Aug 22, 2008


Valdara posted:

Is there a consensus on the best way to use a multi-size pattern? Does it make more sense to cut out the biggest size and then fool with sizing down to what you need so that you can get more use out of the pattern, or should I just say "screw it" and cut it down to size and use the drat pattern in the size I need?

I tend to cut out the largest size, then use wax/carbon paper to trace the smaller outlines onto the fabric as needed.

Rufus En Fuego
Oct 19, 2011

HOUSE BARK

"Winter is Potato"

Cross_ posted:

I tend to cut out the largest size, then use wax/carbon paper to trace the smaller outlines onto the fabric as needed.

You can also make perpendicular cuts every inch or so up to the line of the size you need, fold them under and iron the folds.

These days I just buy three or four of the same pattern and cut them to size.

Brainbread
Apr 7, 2008



I'm not sure anyone is familiar with making mascot-esque costumes? I'm trying to figure out how to secure foam inserts for my project, and am not sure of where to go looking for a guide on the subject.

nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


Brainbread posted:

I'm not sure anyone is familiar with making mascot-esque costumes? I'm trying to figure out how to secure foam inserts for my project, and am not sure of where to go looking for a guide on the subject.

I'd take a safe bet that most furry websites would have information on this stuff. Just go in, get your stuff, and leave.

Don't look anyone in the eyes.

Brainbread
Apr 7, 2008



nolen posted:

I'd take a safe bet that most furry websites would have information on this stuff. Just go in, get your stuff, and leave.

Don't look anyone in the eyes.

Thats what I was hoping to avoid.

I guess I'll burn my cache on the way out.

taiyoko
Jan 10, 2008



Brainbread posted:

I guess I'll burn my cache on the way out.

Private browsing, man, private browsing. Ctrl+Shift+P in Firefox. (Also useful for porn surfing or looking for birthday/Christmas presents for someone who also uses that computer.)

Stultus Maximus
Dec 21, 2009

Whenever I hit "r" in my address bar, Raine Dog comes up. Goddammit.


Can anyone recommend used serger models to look out for?
I've finally decided that maybe knit/stretch fabrics do have a place after all and my Singer 99k just isn't enough.

Hana Dammit
Nov 29, 2004

Punch-drunk tears of a clone.

/\/\/\ babylocks are worth their weight in gold


Picture dump from the last two weeks:

Week 1: a daytime business look that can easily transform into nightwear



The pants turned into a purse


This week we had to "reinvent the first date" for men and I couldn't decide what to do until Tuesday and I decided to buy 6.5 yds of fleece and knit a sweater in 3 days Also I made the jacket.



Making this with such a short deadline made me begin to suffer from some kind of crafting related mental illness


That is all.

eta sweater won best overall and crowd favorite

Hana Dammit fucked around with this message at Mar 5, 2012 around 07:57

Rufus En Fuego
Oct 19, 2011

HOUSE BARK

"Winter is Potato"

Hana Dammit posted:

/\/\/\ babylocks are worth their weight in gold

I. Love. My. Babylock. Holy cow. I may even stipulate that it be buried with me in the event of my death.

Stultus Maximus
Dec 21, 2009

Whenever I hit "r" in my address bar, Raine Dog comes up. Goddammit.


Rufus En Fuego posted:

I. Love. My. Babylock. Holy cow. I may even stipulate that it be buried with me in the event of my death.

What features would you consider essential?

Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


Hana Dammit posted:

/\/\/\ babylocks are worth their weight in gold

I used them all the time in Japan and miss them (and my industrial Juki) so bad. :sad:

I loooove that sweater. I wish I knew how to knit more than a scarf.

Rufus En Fuego
Oct 19, 2011

HOUSE BARK

"Winter is Potato"

Stultus Maximus posted:

What features would you consider essential?

Pretty much all sergers offer the same basic features (which are excellent for beginners), but where the Babylock truly stands out is the self-threading and overall stitch quality, not to mention ease of use. Puckering's pretty much a thing of the past, and the thing's built solid. I bought mine used ages ago and I still haven't needed to get it serviced (even though I should).

Their website has a lot of great information on the various models. http://www.babylock.com/sergers/

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nolen
Apr 4, 2004

butts.


Rufus En Fuego posted:

Pretty much all sergers offer the same basic features (which are excellent for beginners), but where the Babylock truly stands out is the self-threading and overall stitch quality, not to mention ease of use. Puckering's pretty much a thing of the past, and the thing's built solid. I bought mine used ages ago and I still haven't needed to get it serviced (even though I should).

Their website has a lot of great information on the various models. http://www.babylock.com/sergers/

This. Buy used if you can, as they are fairly pricey (but for a good reason).

I loved my Babylock serger so much that I defected from Pfaff and bought a Babylock embroidery machine as well.

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