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kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Jeep Whisperer


I'm just going to put all my projects I never work on in one thread.

First one, my white/brown 1991 Jeep Comanche.

I bought it in January 2010 for $800 with visions of restoring it and never taking it offroad. RWD, tons of terribly done bondo and house paint applied by the previous previous owner, automatic, rust everywhere. The suspension was in fact so rusty that I was afraid to put new shock absorbers on it until it had been replaced.

About to put the new front suspension in:


It decided to become a true jeep and spat the rear main seal out, resulting in a significant oil leak I didn't have time to fix, and a heavy coating of rust protection on the undercarriage and tailgate.

A lot of things broke and wore out, including all the brake lines, rear brake cylinders, gas tank, fuel sender, radiator, trans cooler lines...

It got deathwobble so badly that the passenger side engine mount broke off the engine block. I jacked it up on the side of a residential street, then used something like 50 feet of cheap rope I happened to have with me to tie a sling together under the oil pan as tightly as I could. Drove the rest of the way home, then to a friends house to pick up the new engine.

I'd been collecting parts for a while, and my other jeep had died and gotten scrapped, so I decided it was time to do a lot of upgrades "while I was in there". Several weeks of evening wrenching followed. It got a new engine, a manual transmission conversion, a 4x4 conversion, a front differential locker, a lift, a new rearend, 33" offroad tires, and a rear disc brake conversion, all at once.

Making the new rear leaf spring plates. I decided to use 1/2" plate as I don't have a press brake capable of flanging the edges of a piece of 1/4" plate.


Halfway through the wrench-a-thon. Yes, I work on jeeps on my porch. You can see the terrible body rust starting to bleed through the bondo and house paint here.


TADAAAAA!


I proceeded to bend the front recovery hook brackets over the first time I took it offroad, because they hung down a lot and that didn't agree with my rock crawling style ("aim jeep at obstacle, press accelerator until loud noises are heard, repair jeep".)

So it was time to build a new front bumper for it. 2x6 1/4" wall box tubing with 1" plate tabs for recovery points, 1/4" plate extending approximately 1.5 feet back on the frame rail. This is about the best picture I have of the front bumper, it's big, ugly, and bulletproof. I built it in late October because the jeep club I'm in requires proper recovery points for all vehicles. The welds cooled in the rain as I drove to Pennsylvania, because my work schedule was hectic to say the least and I had left NYC and driven back to Massachusetts the previous evening, spent all night welding, and just plain ran out of time to paint it or even sleep.


I decided to attend the club's winter event at Badlands Offroad Park in Attica, IN, at the beginning of March. As usual, work schedule interfered with any kind of preparation and I ended up throwing my drill press, angle grinders, welder, and metal stock in the back of the van (which I had gotten running for the first time in 3 years the previous weekend) and towing the jeep halfway across the country, then spent a day welding up a matching rear bumper in the campground. The wind was terrible and half my angle grinder cutting wheels blew away.


Hydrolocked the engine. Being a 4.0L, I pulled the spark plugs, cranked it over till no more water sprayed out, put them back in and kept driving it.


Built a ginpole/crane for it because I needed to do a few truck part-outs and didn't feel like trying to roll an engine hoist around the yard. It will lift approximately 1000lbs before the rear tires start gravitating skyward, which is honestly about the most I'd want to have dangling 6 feet in the air while driving around in the woods anyways.




What's that, you need to load a cast iron V8, a 200lb transmission, and a transfer case into the back of a truck in the middle of the woods? Got it.


It sometimes goes fast. I want it to go even faster. This may not look all that quick, but I peak at around 50mph at one spot in this video and have hit 60mph since then. With proper shock tuning and a frame that I'm not afraid of breaking in half, I'm sure I could do most of this run at 40+ and peak at 70. Either Slow Is Fast or chrisgt tore the passenger oh-poo poo handle off in terror.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ENS3VBT6-f0
(pay no attention to the extremely goony commentary)

Right now I'm collecting parts and waiting for winter to be over. I picked up a new-to-me welder, a 230A snap-on YA212A a while ago, and there is a set of 8 lug rims, my smittybuilt xrc8 8000lb winch, a CJ7 dana 300 transfer case, a kingpin Ford dana 60, and enough 1/4" wall box tubing sitting around to build a new frame, as well as a Ruffstuff 3-link kit and assorted sundries. The plan is to pick up a cab-n-chassis chevy 14 bolt rear, a set of 36 or 37" mud tires, and possibly some other stuff. Also a new bed as the existing one is horribly rusted, stress cracked, and basically flapping in the breeze at this point. I haven't decided if it will get a doubler or not, and I've got a chrysler 318 V8 and an NV3500 transmission that may also end up involved, but haven't really made up my mind on that yet. As soon as I've got some stick time on the new welder I plan to start welding up the new frame in my basement. When all is said and done, only the cab, seats, and portions of the interior and wiring harness will remain of the original truck.



Second project: 1988 Jeep Comanche
I've been lusting after a 5.9L converted MJ for a few years, ever since I took a customer's 5.2L Grand Cherokee out on the highway to bed in the brakes I'd just replaced. Being somewhat of a manual transmission zealot, that meant I was looking for a 90s-era gas V8 Dodge 2500 donor truck, preferably in terrible condition cosmetically to keep price down. I spent months watching craigslist like a hawk, only to be beaten to every reasonably priced donor by other buyers.

A friend sent me a craigslist link to a project comanche for sale close by. The seller was asking $550 and the pictures were terrible. I got ahold of him and figured I'd take a look, then post the results of my inspection up on the jeep club's forum in case someone else was looking for one. Long story short it was a lot less rusty than any I'd seen so far, and I ended up driving it home for $500. Oops, now the search for a 5.9L/NV4500 donor is really on...

One Friday evening I came home from work and just before going to sleep, my Firefox session crashed. Firefox is a piece of poo poo, so that meant it reloaded my session from months ago when it tried to recover. I had completely forgotten I was even looking for a 5.9/NV4500 donor truck at this point, began closing the long-irrelevant tabs that had been opened during the recovery and suddenly saw the craigslist search I'd been keeping open previously. At the top of the list was a listing titled "1994 DODGE 2500 PICKUP / MANUAL TRANSMISSION / 4X4 / BADLY RUSTED / EXCELLENT JEEP DRIVETRAIN SWAP DONOR $900 OBO". I couldn't believe it, so I called the seller (at 1AM) and of course got voicemail.

The next morning I called again and the seller said he still had it, and was rather surprised by me worrying about it being gone as he'd only had the listing up for a day. I pulled $900 out of savings and bought it after a short test drive. The transmission alone generally sells for $700, many scrapyards want $1500+, so I wasn't really in much of a mood to haggle.

After parting the truck out, scrapping the chassis and selling the plow and axles, I ended up with the complete drivetrain for around $300. Not too bad.

That's about where this one stands, I just spent the evening replacing parts on the Comanche to restore it to running driving condition before I start planning the wiring harness and finding more parts.

I don't really have any pictures of this one so far, but its future engine and transmission are pictured dangling from the crane further back in this post.

e: Jan11 2013 The 1988 Comanche has started and moved under its own power for the first time in over a year! As far as I recall, the last time it moved was mid July 2011. I parked it because the exhaust system rotted and fell off on my way to work one day, then the gas tank ruptured, the straps broke, and the tank fell out and ended up dragging under the truck approximately a quarter mile from home on the way back. Spent part of yesterday, part of this morning, and a significant portion of this evening replacing steering, brake system, and fuel supply components. Wouldn't have gotten it done without ACEofsnett's help, installing gas tanks is a royal pain in the rear end working alone on dirt/snow/mud.




Third project: 1958 Kaiser Jeep M54A2
I'd been looking for a deuce and a half for no real reason for several years, and even bid on a few on govliquidation without success. My offroad jeep was becoming more and more of a beater and less and less reliable, so I started looking for a pickup and trailer, only to realize I didn't feel like paying $8000+ for a fullsize pickup and $1500+ for a trailer. So instead I decided that was a perfectly good excuse to buy a deuce and a half, since they are far cheaper and an XJ/MJ will shoehorn into the bed reasonably easily. The search was on.

I went looking for a deuce and a half. I found a 5-ton. Ooops, these things happen. It was 550 miles away in southwestern Pennsylvania and the seller said he was more interested in trading for an M715, a restorable CJ or J-truck, or woodworking tools. Since I didn't have any of those things, I checked craigslist and found several running driving M715s ranging from $800 to $2400. So I emailed him and offered to either buy one of them and drive it to him, then trade, or give him $2500 for it, expecting to be laughed at. Instead, late Wednesday I received an email accepting my offer. He said it wasn't really driveable, and that I really should wait until that weekend so he could get some pictures of it for me before I came down to look at it. Unfortunately for him I had already made up my mind and was planning how to get it home, because I am not really automotively sane. I recruited a friend of mine (Chris, not the one known as chrisgt on here) to drive my pickup truck back. Then I remembered that my good friend Jack was on his way home to Massachusetts from Wisconsin, where he had spent an extended weekend at an airplane festival. He knew how to drive a standard (I didn't) so I asked if he could drop by Brownsville PA "on his way home" and give it a spin around the block. He did so and sent me a cellphone video consisting entirely of motion blur and extremely loud exhaust / clipping as well as noting that driving it was terrifying but awesome. I told the seller I would be at his house first thing Saturday morning to take a look at it, but got no response.

THE RECOVERY
Friday night my friend who was to drive my pickup home (while I drove the 5-ton) was nowhere to be found. This is standard behavior for him; he's not all that reliable, which will come into play later on. I finally located him around 8PM and we began the 550 mile drive. Around 7AM we rolled into Brownsville, having slept approximately 2 hours in 15-minute increments along the way just to keep the truck between the lines.

The 5-ton was everything I had hoped for, but the seller was nowhere to be found and wasn't answering his cellphone. Apparently normal people don't answer their cellphones at 7AM on Saturdays. Jack showed up and agreed that yes, the 5 ton was in fact a rather large truck. He strongly recommended I purchase it, probably more for the amusement of watching what I'd do with it than anything else...

Around 10 the seller showed up driving a Jeep J10 pickup with a full set of 53" mud tires on rims for his deuce and a half. He was surprised to see us, as he had thought I flaked on him, and just happened to be dropping the tires off. So we took the truck for another test drive with me riding shotgun since I still didn't know how to drive stick. I was sold, even though the test drive consisted of a very narrow two lane mountain road with a sheer drop into the Monongahela River on one side and a sheer vertical cliff on the other, and there was something like a half a turn of play in the steering wheel.

We returned to the sellers house and set about fixing the truck up for the drive to Massachusetts. One rear inner dually was completely flat, the temperature gauge was non-functional, and it turned out that several of the rivets holding the steering box to the frame were badly stretched. There was no cab top and the drivers seat was so badly blown out there was a chunk of plywood over it to keep the springs from digging into the drivers rear end. We ground the rivets out and replaced them with grade 8 bolts.

Money and title were exchanged and then the question became... how are we going to get this monster back to Massachusetts without a police entanglement? So we called every Notary Public in town and finally found one that was around at 2PM on a Saturday and had temporary license plates on hand. Another $25 and I had my 30 day Pennsylvania temporary license plate. We were good to go.

As I didn't know how to drive stick, we decided that Chris (the slightly unreliable friend) would drive the 5-ton out of town, while I drove the MJ. Since Jack had some friends in Pittsburgh, we headed in that direction. I spent a few hours driving the 5-ton in circles in the Pittsburgh Macys parking lot and getting used to the idea of having 3 pedals to play with. Mall security showed up, asked what in the hell I thought I was doing, verified I owned the truck, then asked me to please promise not to drive over anything and let me continue. After a bit more practice it was time for food, so we went to get pizza.



Then we started the trek back to Massachusetts. Since I wasn't too good at driving stick yet, Chris drove the truck out of town, got it onto the highway, we switched places and I took off in the 5-ton.

Around 10PM (Saturday) it started raining. I had no roof and almost no sleep. It was miserable. It continued to rain until around 2-3AM, when it stopped raining and started pouring instead. More than once I was woken up by a trucker's air horn. At one point road hypnosis set in so badly that several truckers noticed, boxed me in, and then slowed down enough that the bucking of the engine woke me back up. I wish I knew who they were because I owe them big time. I got my second wind and we continued. It stopped raining. A few hundred miles further and it began pouring again. I realized Chris (again, not that reliable) had disappeared. Thinking he had also probably fallen asleep at the wheel, I doubled back and began looking for my MJ upside down in the median. Having backtracked for an hour I gave up, called his phone one last time (no answer) and continued onward. We had agreed to stop at Rausch Creek for a break and to test the truck out, so I continued on through the rain and finally arrived at Rausch around 5AM, soaked to the bone and completely exhausted. There I found my MJ with Chris asleep in it. Apparently he had decided he was tired of following me at 52mph, pulled over, taken a nap, and then simply passed and abandoned me during one of my bouts of road hypnosis. Like I said, a very reliable guy...

We took the 5-ton through a couple of trails at Rausch Creek, but it was still raining. Since there was no roof and the trails are cut to fit jeeps, not cargo trucks, most trails consisted entirely of eating tree branches while trying to keep from ripping the side mirrors off the truck. After a bit of that it was time to hit the road again.

Around the junction of i81 and i84, the rain finally stopped. We were making good time so we continued on at a whopping 50mph. The cement highways in Pennsylvania have expansion joints spaced perfectly so that at my blistering top speed of 52mph, the rear suspension would oscillate. First the front tandem would hit a joint, and bounce up. Then the rear tandem would hit the same bump and bounce up just as the front tandem was falling down again. The end result was that the two rear axles spent the entire drive taking turns bouncing 4" off the pavement. It was like riding on a 20 thousand pound pogo stick, and my hips were black and blue from the seatbelt, because I spent the entire time bouncing off the plywood seat cover, slamming into the seatbelt, and then bouncing back into the plywood again. Over and over and over.





The nice weather continued. We had a long traffic jam behind our convoy, since it seemed like every single driver needed to hover alongside the 5-ton and take a picture or two. Dozens of hot women (seriously. I am not kidding) honked and waved during this period, so the airhorn got a good workout.

Then disaster struck.

Somewhere along i84 there is a very, very long hill in the mountains. I believe it's just after the PA/NY border when leaving PA. It's the kind of hill that doesn't matter in a passenger car, but it's what separates the strong from the weak among truckers and trucks. In fact, there's a dedicated rest stop at the top of the grade just so truckers can pull over and let their poor trucks cool off for a bit.

Halfway up the grade I was really starting to sweat. I'd downshifted to 4th and seemed to be holding my own. Then Chris started running circles around me - literally. He'd pull up along one side, cut me off, look in the rear view mirror, then brake, get into the emergency lane, slow down and let me pass him, then tailgate me and repeat this again and again. I was in no mood for this kind of bullshit and was worried enough already. I checked my phone, no messages. At this point the tach stopped working. Then Chris decided it was time to leave me in the dust again, passed me, and got a few dozen cars ahead. Phone went straight to voicemail. I was hopping mad.

He let me pass him and fell in behind me again, and we continued. 25-30 miles later, I tried to honk the horn when someone waved and got nothing.



I checked my gauges again and determined that not only was the temperature gauge still not working, the tach had stopped working, air pressure was well below minimum and my electrical system was at 24V and not charging. This is bad, as in time to head for the emergency lane and stop IMMEDIATELY bad. I got into the emergency lane and the brake pedal was rock hard, but functional. It took far too long to stop. I opened the hood and discovered chunks of belt everywhere. The valve cover was so hot that drizzle was boiling off of it. I shut the truck off and went to ream Chris a new one. He saw me hopping mad and thought nothing of it, just laughed at how ridiculous I was acting, which didn't really help.

Turns out he had seen chunks of belt flying out from under the truck on the long grade and thought it was a tire about to blow out. Logically, he decided that meant he should get as close as possible, then run circles around me to make absolutely sure the gator would flatten my pickup. Makes sense, right? When the rubber stopped flying out of the truck and I kept moving he assumed everything was fine and kept driving, never telling me any of this. Of course, I should have noticed but the temp gauge didn't work... the reason the tach had failed is because it's driven by a flexible speedo drive cable from a gear takeoff on the front of the engine, inside the path of the air compressor belt. The air compressor belt failed, wedged into the crank pulley, slung around wildly, wrapped around the tach drive cable, tore it in half, then had the decency to jam itself into the dual belts for the generator, water pump, and radiator fan and shred them as well.

Fortunately there were enough auto parts stores around to get some new belts for it. We put the new belts on, poured in four gallons of coolant to make up for what had gone out the overflow, and continued on, after I told Chris he needed to let me know next time something flew out of my drat truck.

Around late afternoon Sunday we made it home to central Massachusetts. That's the kind of trip I don't ever want to do again... but as camino said in his 3800 swapped fiero thread, it's the kind of trip you kinda have to make once.

What did I learn? Fix the loving temperature gauge before going anywhere, that poo poo is important. And watch your gauges very closely! And don't drive when tired!

I drove it to work the next day because, well, what else was I supposed to do? Was a few minutes late to a synch meeting with my boss, apologized saying I had forgotten that my new truck required a 5 minute warmup, could only do 54mph, and a 5 minute cooldown. He's a gearhead, so not only did he understand, he had some questions.

Me: yeah, well, it's not really a new truck obviously... it has to be warmed up and cooled down for 5 minutes to preserve the turbo and only does 54mph on a good day.
Him: wait, it's that slow and it has a turbo? What the hell did you buy?
Me: well, it's a 5 ton military surplus cargo truck. <googles picture>
Him: you mean to tell me THAT is in the parking lot right now?
Me: yes.

The meeting was immediately over and we headed for the parking lot.


(Prius for scale. That is a 6 ton harbor freight jackstand under the tire as a wheel chock)

A few hundred miles later the head gasket blew in a rather serious way. Suddenly the #6 cylinder was venting full boost on top of 22:1 CR right through an assortment of unused mounting holes in the firewall. The cab filled with diesel exhaust and fuel fumes and I made peace with the world. It was deafening even wearing earplugs, which are strictly necessary when driving this truck unless you want severe permanent hearing damage within minutes.





What do you know, apparently engines don't like to be run for 25-30 miles with no water pump or fan. I'm honestly surprised the drat thing didn't seize up or blow out right then and there. I spent most of the winter driving to the friends house where it was parked and working on it. The new head gaskets I got for it were the wrong revision, I asked for the good ones and got the old rev-1 ones that make Land Rover HGs look reliable. The manual didn't tell me to install certain crush rings and the heads may have been slightly warped, so the gaskets blew again and started leaking oil like a sieve a few hundred miles later, but at least it's parked in my yard now instead of 100 miles away in a longsuffering friends yard.

The future: I have a set of 46" Michelin XMLs for it. As soon as I get some HEMMT or FMTV wheels for them, I can mount them up and install them to replace the current 11.00x20 (42") NDCCs. Also, I need to pull the cylinder heads again and have them machined this time. I will probably have a valve job done at the same time and drop the oil pan to check the mains and rod bearings, since I'm not sure if the loud knocking I'm hearing is just an ancient diesel/multifuel engine being itself or one of my conrods about to seek freedom.

This is a 15" rim for scale.


At some point it will be getting a new coat of paint, a cargo cover, and a winch. I hope to swap a Rockwell T1138 transfer case in to replace the current Rockwell T138 as its top highway speed is what Richard Hammond would call "not brilliant" - the T1138 is an overdrive transfer case, which should improve the top speed somewhat or at least allow me to maintain legal highway speed while keeping the engine a bit further from redline. A proper OTR transmission with more than 5 gears would help as well, but that will have to wait.

The biggest challenge on this truck is simply scale. Nothing I've done to it is particularly involved, just pulled the cylinder heads off, replaced the gaskets, did an oil change, changed the fluid in all 3 diffs, etc. The problem is that each head weighs approximately 150lbs, the engine as a whole weighs nearly a ton. Changing one tire when I punctured one took an hour; a stock tire on a rim weighs approximately 300lbs. The lug nut torque spec is legitimately higher than many engines produce at 450 foot pounds minimum. Servicing the differentials required two 5 gallon pails of diff lube and took quite a while even with a rotary crank style pump.

It's a long term project, especially seeing as I won't be able to register it antique until 2015 (the military issued it a 1990 title when they sold it, as it was rebuilt in 1990.) It has 3 axles and a GVWR of nearly 40 thousand pounds, which precludes me from registering it in Massachusetts in any way other than antique, as commercial insurance and registration would amount to at least four figures a year, probably more. So until then it sits and I slowly collect parts and work on it occasionally.


Other jeeps and toyotas will likely end up in this thread as well, seeing as I'm (at this point) mostly done completely overhauling CommissarGribbs' YJ ("sandbagger") and doing a bit of rust repair and rock slider installation on ACEofsnett's 1991 Toyota Hilux.

kastein fucked around with this message at Jan 12, 2013 around 05:22

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Mat_Drinks
Nov 18, 2002

mmm that Royal Purple gets my engine runnin'

Awesome start for a project thread. I look forward to seeing lots of pictures, especially of the welding you do.

And poo poo that drive to get the Kaiser sounds harrowing!

Captain McAllister
May 24, 2001


Man, I started killing myself laughing at your boss' reaction to the truck being in the parking lot. That looks like an awesome project, and I too have an irrational desire to own a 2.5ton. I'd drive it with no top and the windshield down, with a bunch of friends in the back...

mod sassinator
Dec 13, 2006



God drat, that 5.9 liter Comanche is going to be awesome. Comanche SRT-8

Bucephalus
Mar 19, 2009


Oh hi there

Bucephalus fucked around with this message at Jan 10, 2013 around 09:46

SwashedBuckles
Aug 10, 2007

Have at you!

Bucephalus posted:

Oh hi there



You are an stalking magician

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Jeep Whisperer


I am not really all that hard to find. Hell, if you found that my cell number is probably there too. Just call ahead to make sure I am home beforehand

(Seriously though, it takes like 30 seconds to find my name, address, and cellphone if you're anywhere near skilled with google and whois)

Fake edit: what in the poo poo is all that mess in the yard? There are a few parts cars and a pile of demolition debris from the renovations I am doing there right now, but I dunno what all that blue mess is. Also the roof was way worse than it looks in that pic.

Slow is Fast
Dec 25, 2006

Never Give Up


Ken is awesome. Spergs out in IRC. And goes with us on mad sick junkyard runs. He introduced me to the method of parts removal of "break everything around the part you need to get it out faster", made the mustang so much quicker.

I also sat in the five ton and rode in the MJ.

Also also. It was chris who broke the oh poo poo handle not me.

chrisgt
Sep 6, 2011



Slow is Fast posted:

Ken is awesome. Spergs out in IRC. And goes with us on mad sick junkyard runs. He introduced me to the method of parts removal of "break everything around the part you need to get it out faster", made the mustang so much quicker.

I also sat in the five ton and rode in the MJ.

Also also. It was chris who broke the oh poo poo handle not me.

I have no recollection of breaking the oh poo poo handle in the MJ. Also, just to clarify for everyone, I'm not the Chris who picked up the 5ton with ken. I'd have stopped and been like, dude, your truck is making GBS threads rubber.

Bucephalus
Mar 19, 2009


kastein posted:

(Seriously though, it takes like 30 seconds to find my name, address, and cellphone if you're anywhere near skilled with google and whois)

FCC license.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Jeep Whisperer


Yeah, completely different Chris. I should have said that.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Jeep Whisperer


Go figure, I say one thing about actually fixing one of my vehicles and my house's water heater decides it's time to blow up and pour water everywhere.

Free replacement under warranty, day of wrenching shot to hell... win some, lose some.

West SAAB Story
Sep 10, 2010

by XyloJW


At least your foundation cement will be nice and clean. I'd avoid doing any electrical work under the house for the next few days, though..

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Jeep Whisperer


I have a full basement with a dirt floor... no cement here. Ace helped me get the new water heater into the basement and it's all hooked up and working again now.

Also, tore the old steering box and power steering pump out of the 88 MJ. The pump was completely full of water but somehow still turns freely, the box I didn't even bother to check. Broke the horribly designed, terrible, not-nice, piece of poo poo tensioning bolt so that was that, I need to spend a few minutes with the angle grinder and drill press tomorrow and throw together a quick tensioning knuckle replacement so I can get it driving again.

Will probably start work on the brake lines and put the gas tank in tomorrow as well. The weather is nice (it's up into the 40s!) and I've missed working on this truck, just had no real motivation to start...

The water heater fiasco shot to hell most of a day of wrenching, but at least it's warrantied until 2021 now, and only cost some gas to get to home depot and back.

Sandbagger SA
Aug 12, 2003

The most dangerous thing on the battlefield is a junior officer with a compass and a map.


Slow is Fast posted:

Ken is awesome. Spergs out in IRC. And goes with us on mad sick junkyard runs. He introduced me to the method of parts removal of "break everything around the part you need to get it out faster", made the mustang so much quicker.


^this.

Also 99% of what I know about jeeps is his fault and I'm still not a fraction of the way there yet.



kastein posted:



The water heater fiasco shot to hell most of a day of wrenching, but at least it's warrantied until 2021 now, and only cost some gas to get to home depot and back.

And if it's short of 90 days from purchase you dont even have to worry about the warranty.

VikingSkull
Jul 23, 2008

I believe I can fly
I believe I can touch the sk-

*CRUNCH*


That hill on I84 is a motherfucker. I know exactly where you're talking about.

You should see it when it snows, it's basically Mad Max.

Fart Pipe
Jun 11, 2008

It wasnt that bad, after you left I got to help put out the fire!

Slow is Fast posted:

Ken is awesome. Spergs out in IRC. And goes with us on mad sick junkyard runs. He introduced me to the method of parts removal of "break everything around the part you need to get it out faster", made the mustang so much quicker.

I also sat in the five ton and rode in the MJ.

Also also. It was chris who broke the oh poo poo handle not me.

He also found and helped me pull the good engine for my car. By pull I mean we literally had to lift it out and carry it over to the wheelbarrow with our huge manly arms. Ken is awesome.

ACEofsnett
Feb 19, 2007

Funny thing, killin' a man. You take away everything he's got and everything he's gonna have.

Billy Tully posted:


Ken is awesome.

A million times this.

Mr Kastein has become one of my greatest friends courtesy of SA.

All around great dude who will help anyone, anytime.


kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Jeep Whisperer


Except when I do dumb poo poo like forget to connect the drag link to the pitman arm and wonder why the wheels aren't turning


Power steering pump is in, new pressure hose is in, steering box is in... WHY ARENT MY WHEELS TURNING

... oh.



I can't wait to tear all the RENIX crap, 4.0, and auto out of this thing and put a proper drivetrain in. I knew I was in 80s emissions territory when I found a vacuum solenoid controlling a flap door in the intake to draw air over the exhaust manifold during startup, controlled by a metering orifice on... the other side of the air filter. Not even manifold vacuum.

~ if I were a RENIX man, ~
chugga clunka chugga chugga chugga chugga chugga
All day long I'd feel a little glum

...

There would be one long vac hose just going up,
and one even longer coming down!
And oneten more leading nowhere, just for show!

I'd fill my bay with cranks and levers and hoses and servos
For the EPA to see and hear



... I hate 80s vacuum systems so much!


EightBit
Jan 7, 2006
I spent money on this line of text just to make the "Stupid Newbie" go away.

Just get an OBDII 4.0 from a junkyard. More power than that crap and more reliable too.

Slow is Fast
Dec 25, 2006

Never Give Up


EightBit posted:

Just get an OBDII 4.0 from a junkyard. More power than that crap and more reliable too.

Yeah... uhh... there was a blurb about that in the OP


IN OTHER NEWS.

Ace and Ken put a gas tank in the blue MJ and ace is too dumb to post from his phone.

OneOverZero
Oct 14, 2005
Anything you want me to be

Why are you motherfuckers so far away from my XJ/MJ hoard and me?

Ozmiander
Dec 1, 2009

Jeep


I was going to shake my fist at you SO HARD Chris!

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Jeep Whisperer


EightBit posted:

Just get an OBDII 4.0 from a junkyard. More power than that crap and more reliable too.

There's an OBDI 5.9 waiting to go in. And an NV4500. And a chevy 14 bolt (as soon as I pull it at the junkyard.) And the 8 lug brakes off a dodge kingpin dana 60.

That's phase I. As soon as I have that all in and working well, I'm tearing the entire interior, the front clip, and the doors off, removing the engine harness (really every harness forward of the seats) and doing an OBDII swap using an ECU from a 98 5.9L ZJ with the auto trans code stubbed out, building another full custom harness for it, and installing a late model XJ interior, doors, and front clip.

I've already got everything sitting in the parts pile except for the 14 bolt and a good set of late model XJ doors, which is about $230 in parts at the local yard any day I want to pick the stuff up.

My general intent is to turn it into what jeep would have sold as a 1999 metric ton Comanche R/T, but with a manual transmission because the 46re can suck a fat one.

Oh, and it runs and drives now. Brakes leave something to be desired (since I haven't actually run the rest of the lines) but we threw the tank in, pumped the tires back up (3 were flat), put together enough of the brake lines that I don't have to dig behind the gas tank to do them, put a new battery in it, I put the steering box and power steering pump back on this morning, got the belt tensioner fixed up, jumped it, and it started for the first time in a year.

If I finish the brakes, put some better tires on it, replace one idler pulley, and throw the new exhaust on it, I could daily drive it next week. I've had the parts sitting around forever, I just got pissed off and didn't feel like working on it... and that seal has been broken.



e: I forgot to say - it also will be getting one of the few remaining bolt-on 2" receiver hitches in existence because chrisgt is awesome and found one in the junkyard last week, called me up, asked me if I wanted it, and pulled it for me. I could weld one up, but it wouldn't be anywhere near as neatly fabricated.

kastein fucked around with this message at Jan 12, 2013 around 01:15

Slow is Fast
Dec 25, 2006

Never Give Up


So glad the streetmanche is getting some love. Especially after your local homies were ball busting you about it.

I wish you lived closer because I would be over in a heartbeat to help v8 that loving thing.

Advent Horizon
Jan 17, 2003

I love Alaska. The only people Natives beat are their wives.

Do you still have any of those 2WD MJ front axles? If so, could you please take a bunch of photos for me?

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Jeep Whisperer


It's a giant ball of rust. Basically, look at a stock dana 30 front diff from an XJ, then replace the differential casting with a straight piece of tube and weld another upper control arm mount on that's a mirror image of the sheetmetal one on the passenger side. Oh, and they use actual forged or cast spindle knuckles on the 2wd models until 1992.0, at which point they switched to the same knuckles as the 4x4 axle and the same unit bearings just with a dummy stub axle through the bearing assembly to preload the bearings.

I'll take some pics when I pull it to convert it to 8 lug... no idea when that's going to be. I have to disassemble the dodge donor axle first and (hopefully) find local buyers for the rest of the parts from it.

edit: more for my own reference than anyone else's because I'm never gonna remember all this poo poo if I don't put it somewhere

engine/transmission/transfer case/driveshafts/partial wiring harness donor:
1994 dodge ram 2500 1B7KF26Z8RS697637
1410 series rear driveshaft ujoints
already have full FSM

rearend donor:
some loving chevy with a 14-bolt, who cares (ujoint yoke size: 1350 series)

front brake parts donor:
1992 dodge ram 250 1B7KM26C0NS686658

interior exterior & partial wiring harness donor, phase 2:
1999 jeep cherokee
already have full FSM

chassis
1988 jeep comanche 4.0 aw4 2wd shortbed pioneer
need FSM? only for wiring diagram for rear lighting & fuel pump. Probably not necessary.

steering box
stock? 98/99 Durango?

steering pump
stock for 94 dodge ram? WJ pump?

A/C system
??????????????????????????????

rearend donor
80s/90s chevy 1 ton 14 bolt rear
disc brake donor?


adapter U-joint for rear driveshaft to 14-bolt: Spicer U-1435 (1410 to 1350) $37 or get High Angle Driveline 1410 yoke for 14-bolt $195 (alright, adapter U-joint it is!)

kastein fucked around with this message at Jan 12, 2013 around 04:32

Coasterphreak
May 29, 2007
I like cookies.

I love reading about your misadventures exploits kastein, but I gotta ask: do you even understand the concept of sleep?

Super Aggro Crag
Apr 23, 2008

In nomine Patris, et Filii, et Spiritus Sancti, etc etc...


Coasterphreak posted:

I love reading about your misadventures exploits kastein, but I gotta ask: do you even understand the concept of sleep?

He's on IRC when I wake up and when I go to bed, so I'm guessing no.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Jeep Whisperer


Coasterphreak posted:

I love reading about your misadventures exploits kastein, but I gotta ask: do you even understand the concept of sleep?

I'll have plenty of time to sleep when I'm dead.

Sandbagger SA
Aug 12, 2003

The most dangerous thing on the battlefield is a junior officer with a compass and a map.


kastein posted:

I'll have plenty of time to sleep when I'm dead.

Don't joke about that- who else can design a freakin circuit board to change my vss signal?

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Jeep Whisperer


Slight hitch on the 8 lug front brake conversion, it looks like I may need to remove the inner knuckles from the donor axle, turn them out to sleeve over the recipient, and weld them in place, or possibly machine some custom spindle adapter flanges or custom knuckles. The latter is almost certainly not going to happen, I'm looking at how annoying the first and second options will be.

e: knuckle dimensions info dump
92 dodge 250 spindle pilot 4.5" OD (approx. 114mm)
92 dodge 250 spindle mounting bolt circle 5.5625"
92 dodge 250 spindle mounting bolt angles: 2 on horizontal plane, 2 @ 60deg below plane, 2 @ 55deg above plane (mirror image 6 bolt pattern, horizontal and vertical symmetrical)
XJ dana 30 knuckle pilot bore 100mm ID
XJ dana 30 mounting bolt circle 120mm on center (even 120 degree spacing)

XJ lower balljoint taper 1.5" TPF (same as 1 ton tie rod end taper, XKUT reamer #6952)
XJ upper balljoint taper 2" TPF (used 1.5" TPF reamer and calipers to verify)

XJ lower balljoint tapers from .702" @ bottom to .815" @ top (taper depth: 1") = approx. 1.5" TPF

XJ upper balljoint tapers from .587" @ bottom to .75" @ top (taper depth: 1") = 2" TPF

XJ upper to lower balljoint taper distance (milled lower face to milled lower face) 8 5/16"

XJ steering axis inclination: approx. 9 degrees back from plane of spindle mount

92 dodge 250 ujoint axis to rear spindle mounting face: ??? need to measure
92 dodge 250 rear spindle mounting face to wheel mounting surface: ??? need to measure

XJ steering arm radius & ackermann angle: ???, ???

XJ knuckles are cast, machined steel. The thickest portions are 1" where the balljoint tapers go through, the rest is mostly 1/4" to 3/8" thick. I believe custom knuckle fabrication won't be all that difficult since most dimensions will simply be duplicated and the remainder will either be deleted (brake caliper slide bolt and support arms) or changed (unit bearing or spindle mounting face + bolt bosses.) The unfortunate part is that it doesn't appear there will be space for a 5-806x dana 60 size U-joint within the knuckle, so this is definitely limited to RWD or 5-760x 30/44 U-joint applications only. I need to see if there is a 5-760x U-joint outer stub shaft for this application or if I'll have to have custom ones made; if custom is required there's a much lower chance of this ever becoming a 4x4 vehicle again.

e2: wheels
wheels to be used are 16x6.5" dodge steelies, 8x6.5 lug pattern, reportedly 4.75" backspacing.

kastein fucked around with this message at Jan 26, 2013 around 01:33

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Jeep Whisperer


Question - does anyone know what the steering axis inclination / kingpin inclination on a Jeep XJ/MJ/TJ/YJ/ZJ/WJ Dana 30 frontend is? How about a Jeep Wagoneer/J-truck Dana 44? This is going to be quite annoying to measure accurately and I suspect it might be listed in the alignment specs on alldata or something.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Jeep Whisperer


More work on the blue MJ today. I replaced the rest of the brake hardline on the chassis for the rear wheels, the front left brake hardline, the two small lines between the proportioning valve and the master cylinder, swapped in an XJ proportioning valve to do away with the stupid load sensing valve and dual brake lines to the rear, then flushed and bled the master cylinder.

Then I went to break all the bleeder valves free to start bleeding everything. Front left and both rears (shockingly) came free without any trouble, but the front right bleeder rounded off instead even though I was using a 6 point socket on it. Damnit.

Not only that, I noticed that the hardline where it goes into the front right brake hose is now leaking rather vigorously. There was some rust spotting on it but it's a pain in the rear end to replace (buried under emissions equipment and wiring harnesses as it runs along the firewall behind the engine) so I was going to leave it alone. I guess I don't have that kind of luck. Hopefully I can replace just a few inches of it where it's in the wheel well and gets blasted with salt, which is where it failed... I need to check for rust along the rest of the line now though.

Hopefully I have a spare bleeder valve for the front right caliper, and hopefully it comes out with heat and vise grips instead of twisting off like I suspect it will

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Jeep Whisperer


Started the day by jumping the blue MJ off the white MJ, because the blue one has the old battery from my first XJ in it, and that battery sat uncharged since last winter.



Then I spent quite a while in brake line hell (see last post.)




Some heat and a pair of vise grips got that little bastard out.


What loving idiot forgot to put the flare nut on before doing a perfect flare in an annoying spot?


Got all the brakes done, half-rear end bled (the pedal is super soft, though they do function, I think the rear drums are pooched) and drove it out of the yard for the first time in a year and a half

It needs some other work but at least the drat thing goes, steers, and stops under its own power again.

Veeb0rg
Jul 24, 2001

THIS CONVERSATION IS NONPRODUCTIVE!

I'm not looking forward to doing the hard lines on the front my jeep this spring. I need to change my soft lines and my current hard lines look like they'll leak if you even think of touching them. I'm just going to get the pre-bent ones from the dealer.

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Jeep Whisperer


Brake lines are easy, but I hate doing them anyways. The feeling of brake fluid on my hands just annoys me.

I decided to try and get the 5 ton running again today. It laughed at me.

Had borrowed a battery charger from a friend of mine, so I put the probably hosed batteries on it for a week to see if they'd hold a charge. It sure seemed like they did, so...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NH2GEyGZkh4

And then I tried to start it, after priming the fuel system, flushing the filter, etc.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NqbtXVC6Sao

It didn't agree with that plan.


So it looks like it needs two new batteries plus engine work. Oh well, 2 weeks ago I thought it needed two new batteries plus engine work, so I didn't really lose anything by trying, though it was a bit annoying to wash the acid off the battery box and underside of the cab.

kastein fucked around with this message at Feb 4, 2013 around 23:03

kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Jeep Whisperer




The blue MJ still starts on its own and moves after a few weeks. I'm pleasantly surprised, I thought that battery was junk and was about to scrap it.

Slow is Fast
Dec 25, 2006

Never Give Up


kastein posted:



The blue MJ still starts on its own and moves after a few weeks. I'm pleasantly surprised, I thought that battery was junk and was about to scrap it.

Needs a big 'murcan flag to make that shot complete

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kastein
Aug 31, 2011

Jeep Whisperer


You mean like this?





(took that July 4th)

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