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Not an Anthem
Apr 27, 2003

I'm a fucking pain machine and if you even touch my fucking car I WILL FUCKING DESTROY YOU.


Goldaline posted:

I'm a big cheapo so I just trace off things I own that I like the fit of. This was pretty much unmodified from a sweet Liz Clairborne hawaiian shirt I have from the 90's.
I'm still a total novice but I try to copy things I see. I don't know how to do shirt construction, even though I'm sure its simple, so I don't know how to copy patterns from things I own although I'd love to copy a few specific cuts. Any video/youtube or websites you know that show this sort of thing well?

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armorer
Aug 6, 2012

I like metal.

Not an Anthem posted:

I'm still a total novice but I try to copy things I see. I don't know how to do shirt construction, even though I'm sure its simple, so I don't know how to copy patterns from things I own although I'd love to copy a few specific cuts. Any video/youtube or websites you know that show this sort of thing well?

This is pretty much me too. I picked up a used copy of the book Patterns from Finished Clothes for $4, but have yet to make anything using the techniques it describes. The book is well reviewed, and what I have read in it seems totally reasonable. It basically talks about recreating a pattern from a given garment without having to dismantle it. I am still reading it, but I believe it also talks about how to determine the order and methods of assembly.

If you want, I can post a more useful opinion of the book once I've actually recreated something using its methods.

Rabbit Hill
Mar 11, 2009

God knows what lives in me in place of me.

Grimey Drawer

I posted this in the women's fashion thread, but it might be better suited over here...


How kosher is it to take your old favorite pair of pants to a tailor or dressmaker and asking them to make a smaller pair made using the old pair as a pattern/template?

I've been thinking about doing that for one of my pants that I adore and would wear until the seams shredded away, but I've lost weight and they don't fit anymore. However, is that just not done, or would it be expensive (for me, $150+)? Would I have to provide the fabric for the new pants, or would the tailor locate that him/herself?

And along those lines....I have an actual dress pattern from the 1960s that I've been wanting to use to make myself a dress, but now I'm a bit smaller than the size of the pattern and it's one of the old-fashioned kind that only marks out one size. If I took it to a tailor to have them make me a dress, they would have to resize the pattern to fit me -- would this be doable, or would it be a serious pain in the rear end for the tailor?

Amykinz
May 6, 2007


You could do both those things. A seamstress or tailor should be able to fit the dress to your size, as long as there's not a huge difference in measurements. With the pants, they should be able to make them and find fabric, but it might not be cost effective, depending on where you are.

Rabbit Hill
Mar 11, 2009

God knows what lives in me in place of me.

Grimey Drawer

Awesome, thanks! There are two tailors within walking distance of my job, so I could drop in and see if they could give me an estimate on the custom pants.

Goldaline
Dec 20, 2006

my dear

Dammmmmn this is a big quilt.

It's just about 109" (9 feet!) square, I don't know how in god's name I'm going to baste it together! I might bring it to school and use our 15-foot fabric printing tables.

But I love it! Hoping against hope I can get it quilted before it gets cold, but that's a whole lot of hand-quilting!

pepsigloworm
Mar 11, 2005
Moo

Goldaline posted:

Dammmmmn this is a big quilt.


Wow, that is absolutely gorgeous, there isn't much I wouldn't do to have something like that. I love the color scheme and how it fades!

madlilnerd
Jan 4, 2009

a bush with baggage

Goldaline posted:

Dammmmmn this is a big quilt.

It's just about 109" (9 feet!) square, I don't know how in god's name I'm going to baste it together! I might bring it to school and use our 15-foot fabric printing tables.

But I love it! Hoping against hope I can get it quilted before it gets cold, but that's a whole lot of hand-quilting!

Awesome work! I've loved watching this project grow.

It looks so good on the wall, just tack it up and slowly patchwork your whole house :allears:

Unoriginal
May 12, 2001


Having taught myself everything I know, I obviously have some huge gaps in my knowledge including the area regarding ironing boards. What should I be using for padding under my ironing board's cover? The pad that came with it was cheap and thin and virtually useless (and was causing the board's grid pattern to be burned/melted into some of my fabrics) so I bought a new one. There weren't many to choose from at Jo-Ann and I need it now so I just grabbed the heaviest duty looking one and what do you know, it's made of polyester felt. So when I was ironing on some interfacing, it became flattened and lumpy with iron prints and didn't bounce back.

WTF am I supposed to use instead because this is ridiculous. Who would make an ironing board pad out of something that melts under high heat, like what you might encounter while *ironing*?

Stultus Maximus
Dec 21, 2009

USPOL May


Unoriginal posted:

Having taught myself everything I know, I obviously have some huge gaps in my knowledge including the area regarding ironing boards. What should I be using for padding under my ironing board's cover? The pad that came with it was cheap and thin and virtually useless (and was causing the board's grid pattern to be burned/melted into some of my fabrics) so I bought a new one. There weren't many to choose from at Jo-Ann and I need it now so I just grabbed the heaviest duty looking one and what do you know, it's made of polyester felt. So when I was ironing on some interfacing, it became flattened and lumpy with iron prints and didn't bounce back.

WTF am I supposed to use instead because this is ridiculous. Who would make an ironing board pad out of something that melts under high heat, like what you might encounter while *ironing*?

New ironing board pads are universally terrible. Jute padding could work, maybe.

handbags at dawn
Mar 8, 2007

by T. Finninho


I put some old flat used-up bath towels under mine - usually I save them and cut them up to use for cleaning rags, but these two are padding under the ironing board cover now. My mom put an old fleece blanket under hers. You could use quilt batting as well.

Rufus En Fuego
Oct 19, 2011

HOUSE BARK

"Winter is Potato"

Natural cotton batting about ľ" thick. I haven't had to change it in over five years!

Big Bad Beetleborg
Apr 8, 2007

Things may come to those who wait...but only the things left by those who hustle.



I know the common wisdom is not to buy your first machine but look at this thing!


So tempted for about $50 US, and all I want to do is putz around and maybe make a few bowties.

Rubber Slug
Aug 7, 2010

THE BLUE DEMON RIDES AGAIN


Do any of you have an idea how hard it would be to create a puffer-vest lookalike using cordura nylon? Is it feasible? (I've never made a piece of clothing before).

Desiree Cousteau
Jan 15, 2012


mirthdefect, my first sewing machine was the Post-War Japanese knock-off of that machine. It was a tank, and I used to it sew denim and leather. It only went forward and I could go backwards manually.

I was so proud....

Amykinz
May 6, 2007


Rubber Slug posted:

Do any of you have an idea how hard it would be to create a puffer-vest lookalike using cordura nylon? Is it feasible? (I've never made a piece of clothing before).

Cordura nylon is kinda stiff and almost scratchy. You might want a thinner nylon fabric. Cordura is the stuff backpacks and bullet proof vests are covered in. It's stiff, almost kinda rough, and frays like crazy unless you finish the edges well. If I am remembering right, it also doesn't crease or fold for poo poo, so your seams won't look nice and finished either. If you want the puffy "colorado" vest, it's made out of something that felt like old sleeping bags, right?

You probably want something like these?

http://www.fabric.com/ProductDetail.aspx?ProductID=2ff76b4a-2418-41bd-9f71-848c2d0a24eb

http://www.fabric.com/ProductDetail.aspx?ProductID=77d6766d-260e-4a70-96f4-2b480b531bb8

Rubber Slug
Aug 7, 2010

THE BLUE DEMON RIDES AGAIN


Amykinz posted:

Cordura nylon is kinda stiff and almost scratchy. You might want a thinner nylon fabric. Cordura is the stuff backpacks and bullet proof vests are covered in. It's stiff, almost kinda rough, and frays like crazy unless you finish the edges well. If I am remembering right, it also doesn't crease or fold for poo poo, so your seams won't look nice and finished either. If you want the puffy "colorado" vest, it's made out of something that felt like old sleeping bags, right?

You probably want something like these?

http://www.fabric.com/ProductDetail.aspx?ProductID=2ff76b4a-2418-41bd-9f71-848c2d0a24eb

http://www.fabric.com/ProductDetail.aspx?ProductID=77d6766d-260e-4a70-96f4-2b480b531bb8

Hmm, that's good to know. Maybe I should have posted it in the cosplay thread, but they probably don't know quite as much about materials and clothing fabrication. I'm trying to replicate this vest.



Cordura was the closest thing I could find, visually, but I know next to nothing.

pepsigloworm
Mar 11, 2005
Moo

Rubber Slug posted:

Hmm, that's good to know. Maybe I should have posted it in the cosplay thread, but they probably don't know quite as much about materials and clothing fabrication. I'm trying to replicate this vest.



Cordura was the closest thing I could find, visually, but I know next to nothing.

There is a Cosplay Creation thread in DIY that's doing well, someone there might have ideas! - http://forums.somethingawful.com/showthread.php?threadid=3473045

Rubber Slug
Aug 7, 2010

THE BLUE DEMON RIDES AGAIN


Alright, I'll take it there. :)

Amykinz
May 6, 2007


Rubber Slug posted:

Hmm, that's good to know. Maybe I should have posted it in the cosplay thread, but they probably don't know quite as much about materials and clothing fabrication. I'm trying to replicate this vest.



Cordura was the closest thing I could find, visually, but I know next to nothing.

Ok, that's like a LBV or a bullet-proof vest type thing, so Cordura is right on what you'd want to use, but it might be difficult if you've never made anything before. I thought there was a goon in this thread who made protection vests and belts for local PD? Either that or s/he had a thread somewhere in here and that person might be able to give you more info. I've never sewn the stuff with a machine, but I've "repaired" my own military gear and had some issues with it.

The cosplay thread would be the best place though, because they'll be able to tell you other things that people have used for similar items.

TheNothingNew
Nov 10, 2008


Amykinz posted:

Ok, that's like a LBV or a bullet-proof vest type thing, so Cordura is right on what you'd want to use, but it might be difficult if you've never made anything before. I thought there was a goon in this thread who made protection vests and belts for local PD? Either that or s/he had a thread somewhere in here and that person might be able to give you more info. I've never sewn the stuff with a machine, but I've "repaired" my own military gear and had some issues with it.

The cosplay thread would be the best place though, because they'll be able to tell you other things that people have used for similar items.

Found it:
http://forums.somethingawful.com/showthread.php?threadid=3501203
Over in TFR.
Guy goes through his build process, definitely worth a look.

Rubber Slug
Aug 7, 2010

THE BLUE DEMON RIDES AGAIN


Awesome, thanks!

tFUCKINGmesis
Oct 5, 2011


Making things that are actually wearable is so exciting! Especially knits, once you actually try them.

Also, I recently realized that I've been massively faked out by all of my RTW garments - the fabric always seems thicker than it actually is because of the seam and hem finishing, so it's not that I'm just mysteriously finding thinner fabric than everyone else seems to have. I feel kind of stupid now, but way better. :downs:

taiyoko
Jan 10, 2008




My wonderful friends are incapable of planning poo poo in advance.

Because of this, I've been implored to make a vest for a friend of mine to be in a wedding on Saturday. My question is in the sizing.

I'm planning on using this pattern, and my friend's measurements are 44" chest, 47" waist. The pattern envelope says that a 44" chest goes with a 39" waist.

Should I just go solely off the chest measurement, or taper the smaller pattern with the right chest measurement into the larger size with the right waist measurement?

Ashcans
Jan 2, 2006

Let's do the space-time warp again!


You need to modify the pattern to accommodate his waist, otherwise you are going to end up making him look terrible when the buttons on the vest don't close and he looks like Chris Farley. I think that the best way to do this is actually with a French Curve or a similar tool, but basic idea is that you want to re-draft the pattern connecting the chest of the 44" to the waist of 47", and create a natural curve between those two. Ideally I would make a muslin and check the fitting before moving on.

On the other hand they have apparently asked you to do this with less than 24hrs notice, so I feel like you would be totally justified just making the Chris Farley vest and telling them to deal with it.

Brigg
Dec 27, 2006
Master of all things orange.

Just got reminded of this thread. I was the guy who makes the Body armor for the Police departments. Just chiming in to say that 1000D Cordura is likely too stiff to make any kind of puffy vest, But you could probably get away with it using 500D cordura, or 420D nylon packcloth (If you dont mind it being a little shiny).

Cordura also doesn't fray. ever. At least not the more common urethane coated kind. Ive had vests where the arm hole stitches have come loose and had the edge open, where the fabric never raveled even after 2 years (Dont ask why I never fixed it. The only time ive ever seen it fray was when pulling out a stitch a little too roughly, where it slightly tore the edge.

Uncoated cordura will fray and ravel though, but its fairly uncommon to come across in any case.

1000D cordura is stiff but its still great for outdoor wear simply due to its durability. you have to be *trying* to rip it, and even then its hard.

On that note, heres the last thing i made out of 1000D, and outdoor/hunting vest.

Amykinz
May 6, 2007


Brigg posted:


Cordura also doesn't fray. ever. At least not the more common urethane coated kind. Ive had vests where the arm hole stitches have come loose and had the edge open, where the fabric never raveled even after 2 years (Dont ask why I never fixed it. The only time ive ever seen it fray was when pulling out a stitch a little too roughly, where it slightly tore the edge.

Ah, my bad then. I must be remembering some other type of 'durable' fabric type stuff. The stuff I remember was just like the fabric in that vest, but once heavy use tore the binding off the bias edge of the armhole, it was IMPOSSIBLE to re-bind it. The weave just kept unraveling. This was like 10 years ago though, so who knows.

Brigg
Dec 27, 2006
Master of all things orange.

Could have been a cheap knockoff "cordura" that is commonly available. you can find it on ebay sold quite often. It feels heavy duty until you realize that with an open edge you can tear it by hand.

When I first started I got stuck with that stuff a lot. I call it fauxdura now. Real 1000D cordura is incredibly hard, if not impossible to rip by hand. You can generally tell the fake crap by its black waterproof backing. Real cordura is clear urethane backed, so you can see the fabric through it.

Big Bad Beetleborg
Apr 8, 2007

Things may come to those who wait...but only the things left by those who hustle.




That is an impressively thick beard you're sporting there.

taiyoko
Jan 10, 2008




Ashcans posted:

You need to modify the pattern to accommodate his waist, otherwise you are going to end up making him look terrible when the buttons on the vest don't close and he looks like Chris Farley. I think that the best way to do this is actually with a French Curve or a similar tool, but basic idea is that you want to re-draft the pattern connecting the chest of the 44" to the waist of 47", and create a natural curve between those two. Ideally I would make a muslin and check the fitting before moving on.

On the other hand they have apparently asked you to do this with less than 24hrs notice, so I feel like you would be totally justified just making the Chris Farley vest and telling them to deal with it.

Welp, I did my best with not having a french curve to help make the lines nicer, I just hope that since I didn't have the chance to take the measurements myself that they're actually accurate, and that this thing fits him. All that's left right now is to press the whole thing, and add the buttons and buttonholes. At least it looks pretty decent, even though I closed up the sides with a small whipstitch instead of fighting with slipstitching it. Not like anyone's gonna be looking that closely at the side seams.

Rubber Slug
Aug 7, 2010

THE BLUE DEMON RIDES AGAIN


Brigg posted:

Could have been a cheap knockoff "cordura" that is commonly available. you can find it on ebay sold quite often. It feels heavy duty until you realize that with an open edge you can tear it by hand.

When I first started I got stuck with that stuff a lot. I call it fauxdura now. Real 1000D cordura is incredibly hard, if not impossible to rip by hand. You can generally tell the fake crap by its black waterproof backing. Real cordura is clear urethane backed, so you can see the fabric through it.

Where do you get your cordura from?

Unoriginal
May 12, 2001





I made a messenger bag for a craft swap. I've never made a bag before and I made a few mistakes, but overall, I'm REALLY proud of how it came out. I didn't make any giant mistakes (except burning the front panel fabric once and having to remake it, but I that was partly the ironing board's fault) and I only ironed my hand once. I haven't had a project go right in forever so this is a huge confidence booster for me.

Ashcans
Jan 2, 2006

Let's do the space-time warp again!


taiyoko posted:

Welp, I did my best with not having a french curve to help make the lines nicer, I just hope that since I didn't have the chance to take the measurements myself that they're actually accurate, and that this thing fits him. All that's left right now is to press the whole thing, and add the buttons and buttonholes. At least it looks pretty decent, even though I closed up the sides with a small whipstitch instead of fighting with slipstitching it. Not like anyone's gonna be looking that closely at the side seams.

I am really impressed that you went from patterning to finishing touches in what, nine hours? Even when I really buckle down it takes me forever to get anything done. Pictures of your final product would be pretty cool, although I imagine at this point it's already wedding-bound.

taiyoko
Jan 10, 2008




I'll be heading up there soon. Unfortunately, I just found out the buttonhole feature on my machine is somehow hosed up and isn't actually feeding the fabric, so it sits there in one spot and stitches until it jams. gently caress this poo poo, I'm gonna safety pin him into it and everyone can get over it. Or if it turns out something sizing-wise went wonky, he can Chris Farley it.

But yes, I will get pictures.



Also, Unoriginal, that bag is amazing.

Brigg
Dec 27, 2006
Master of all things orange.

You can always make the button hole manually if your machine has a zigzag option (which Im assuming it does).

None of my machines do anything fancy at all, and only my Consew 199RB even has a zigzag. What I do is just make a chalk mark the size that I want the button hole, then do a zigzag or two up and down each side and also the tops and bottoms, then just slit the middle with an exacto knife after.

taiyoko
Jan 10, 2008




Brigg posted:

You can always make the button hole manually if your machine has a zigzag option (which Im assuming it does).

None of my machines do anything fancy at all, and only my Consew 199RB even has a zigzag. What I do is just make a chalk mark the size that I want the button hole, then do a zigzag or two up and down each side and also the tops and bottoms, then just slit the middle with an exacto knife after.

Good to know! I didn't have time to gently caress with it, and he was still happy with it. In fact, my friends said that if it wasn't for the lack of buttons/buttonholes and lack of a tag, they'd have thought it was bought from a store.

No close-up pics of the construction or anything, but here it is on the guy I made it for:

Ashcans
Jan 2, 2006

Let's do the space-time warp again!


taiyoko posted:

Good to know! I didn't have time to gently caress with it, and he was still happy with it. In fact, my friends said that if it wasn't for the lack of buttons/buttonholes and lack of a tag, they'd have thought it was bought from a store.

No close-up pics of the construction or anything, but here it is on the guy I made it for:



Looks like it came out nicely, button issues and all. I seriously hate doing buttonholes, none of my machines have the function so I just have to use the zigzag stitch and something always seems to go slightly wrong. If I could I would make all clothing with laces or zippers.

Rufus En Fuego
Oct 19, 2011

HOUSE BARK

"Winter is Potato"

I know it's archaic, but doing buttonholes by hand is really satisfying.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buttonhole_stitch

Reverend Cheddar
Nov 6, 2005

wriggle cat is happy


Rufus En Fuego posted:

I know it's archaic, but doing buttonholes by hand is really satisfying.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buttonhole_stitch

I do all my buttonholes by hand :whatup: Just cause my last machine didn't work the feeder with the buttonhole attachment well.
But done well and with proper thread, handsewn buttonholes will last a lot longer.

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Nettles Coterie
Dec 24, 2008

Play in the Dark, lest the Heat catch you standing still


Does anyone know of a good pattern for a women's button-up shirt that isn't, well, hella soccer mom-ish? Ideally something fairly easy to tailor around a large chest/small waist? I just wanna be all classy & poo poo, but I can never seem to find a decent blouse pattern. No matter what I go looking for I just end up coming home with 5 new dress patterns that I'll never make.

Unoriginal posted:




I made a messenger bag for a craft swap. I've never made a bag before and I made a few mistakes, but overall, I'm REALLY proud of how it came out. I didn't make any giant mistakes (except burning the front panel fabric once and having to remake it, but I that was partly the ironing board's fault) and I only ironed my hand once. I haven't had a project go right in forever so this is a huge confidence booster for me.

This looks SO GOOD! Insanely professional looking, I would never have guessed it was homemade. It took me about 10 tries to make a halfway decent bag.

Nettles Coterie fucked around with this message at 17:53 on Sep 12, 2012

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