Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us money per month for bills, and since we don't believe in showing ads to our users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
 
  • Post
  • Reply
The Electronaut
May 10, 2009


New Zealand can eat me posted:

PYF Braised Beef 2600k Recipe

Sous vide 2600k is the best way to cook Intel chips.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Rastor
Jun 2, 2001



Braised Beef 2600k

Ingredients:
1-2 pounds chuck beef
1 whole onion
2 cloves garlic
1 can beer
olive oil
thyme
rosemary
salt
pepper

Cut onion into large chunks. Crush garlic cloves.
Oil a cooking pot or dutch oven and set to high heat on a stove. Season meat generously with salt and pepper. Sear meat on both sides, about 2 minutes per side. Remove meat from pan. Lower heat to medium.
Throw in onions and garlic. Stir for 30 seconds. Pour in beer, and add thyme, rosemary, and salt to taste---about 1 teaspoon (don't be cautious with the salt).
Add meat to pot, push to submerge, and place lid on pot.

Start Prime95 or other heavy benchmark load on the 2600k. Place pot on heatsink and cook for several hours, until meat is fork tender and falling apart.

GRINDCORE MEGGIDO
Feb 28, 1985




I recommend a nice overclock if you are expecting guests sooner.

Platystemon
Feb 13, 2012



Braise with lead‐free solder at 350C or marinate in your thermal compound of choice.

Toast Museum
Dec 3, 2005

30% Iron Chef


That reminded me of this post from back when processors would smoke and maybe catch fire if the heatsink fell off.

EdEddnEddy
Apr 5, 2012





I have a copper 1/2 of the Thermaltake water cooling kit somewhere that would have been immensely better for that test then using coins would have been. The water cooler was crap (acrylic likes to crack and leak, I can't say I will ever trust a kit that uses it ever) but the copper block part of it was solid, and makes a good cooler for various other things I have used it on in the past.

VulgarandStupid
Aug 5, 2003
I AM, AND ALWAYS WILL BE, UNFUCKABLE AND A TOTAL DISAPPOINTMENT TO EVERYONE. DAE WANNA CUM PLAY WITH ME!?


The review embargo is up. This is pretty much what everyone was thinking: A big step up for AMD but not enough to beat Intel for gaming. There is some value for production work. They don't OC that well, either but they've already driven Intel prices down a little, so I guess mission accomplished.

Here's one review I watched briefly, but I'm sure you all have your favorite YouTube tech personalities, too.

https://youtu.be/j7UBHjtCXhU

GRINDCORE MEGGIDO
Feb 28, 1985




Celebrating AMD launch day by buying a delid tool for my 6600k.

Kazinsal
Dec 13, 2011






Well'p I guess I'm pricing out a 7700K build so I can finally get off this ancient clunky SB-E box that doesn't OC worth a hot drat.

eames
May 9, 2009



Cannonlake to be a stacked/3D modular architecture? On-die coprocessors for native ARM code?

http://seekingalpha.com/article/405...e-leaked-patent

Take this with a large amount of but if it is true then AMD is in for a big surprise. Interesting timing on the article of course.

mobby_6kl
Aug 9, 2009

"You are the best poster... do not let anyone say otherwise."


That's... extremely suspicious. I don't know that much about semiconductor manufacturing but that seems that designing, testing and making all these combinations would be a huge pain in the rear end, assuming it's even possible to randomly exchange graphics with cache with small cores like that in the first place.

Watermelon Daiquiri
Jul 10, 2010




I guess they hope interposers are great

Tokamak
Dec 22, 2004



eames posted:

Cannonlake to be a stacked/3D modular architecture? On-die coprocessors for native ARM code?

The article pretty much explains why it isn't likely to be real in the first couple of paragraphs. Pretty much the only reason the writer thinks it could be real is that they used an acronym of an upcoming microarchitecture in one of the drawings. It isn't really feasible with how chips are currently produced. Anyone buying them would have to get a lot of them, and you wouldn't be designing them off a website.

One of the purposes of patent drawings is to express some of the patent's embodiments (implementations). So saying a customisable chip could have the latest intel cores, FPGA... is for illustrative purposes. They need to say that it can everything, be customised however, and procured whenever to cover their bases. So going with a codename (which we've known for a year prior) for a something that isn't even out makes the most sense in that context.

This is like seeing that PS4 patent where you say 'Mcdonalds' to skip an advert, and extrapolating that Mcdonalds is so specific that there must be some deal in place for it to happen. So therefore it will happen.

PerrineClostermann
Dec 15, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


B-1.1.7 Bomber
Feb 19, 2005

THE DARK SIDE OF SCIENCE BREEDS A WEAPON OF WAR


Buglord

Is there some sort of "Intel CPUs for Dummies" article somewhere that someone can point me to?

I hear Kaby Lake Sky Lake Coffee Lake and it all makes my head spin and I don't know what the differences are and which one is which series, etc. Similarly, I'd love to know what's on tap for the next two years and what each new CPU is supposed to bring to the table.

Thanks for the hand-holding.

silence_kit
Jul 14, 2011


Tokamak posted:

The article pretty much explains why it isn't likely to be real in the first couple of paragraphs. Pretty much the only reason the writer thinks it could be real is that they used an acronym of an upcoming microarchitecture in one of the drawings. It isn't really feasible with how chips are currently produced. Anyone buying them would have to get a lot of them, and you wouldn't be designing them off a website.

Why isn't it feasible? I certainly don't think that some guy in this thread is going to be able to afford a custom multi-chip-module assembly for his gaming rig, but why would it be unreasonable for Intel to offer this kind of service for its larger enterprise customers?

fat bossy gerbil
Jul 1, 2007



WAR DOGS OF SOCHI posted:

Is there some sort of "Intel CPUs for Dummies" article somewhere that someone can point me to?

I hear Kaby Lake Sky Lake Coffee Lake and it all makes my head spin and I don't know what the differences are and which one is which series, etc. Similarly, I'd love to know what's on tap for the next two years and what each new CPU is supposed to bring to the table.

Thanks for the hand-holding.
Kaby Lake are the current (7th generation, ie 7000 series) Intel chips. If you're looking to buy now those are what you want.

Coffee Lake is 8th gen, they should release towards the end of 2017. It will offer a marginal increase in performance and consume somewhat less power. Intel claims they'll be 15% faster than Kaby Lake which means they'll be 5-10% faster in real world applications, as has been the case for the last five generation of Intel chips.

Intel processors with a K in the number (7600k etc.) can overclock, chips without the k don't. If you want to overclock get a Z series chipset, if you know you wont overclock and need an affordable board get an H series.

Chips with hyperthreading can run two threads on one core, chips without it have one thread per core.

Cannon Lake are the 9th gen chips scheduled for release sometime in the first half of 2018, they'll be the first 10nm chips but other than that little is known about them.

priznat
Jul 7, 2009

Let's get drunk and kiss each other all night.

silence_kit posted:

Why isn't it feasible? I certainly don't think that some guy in this thread is going to be able to afford a custom multi-chip-module assembly for his gaming rig, but why would it be unreasonable for Intel to offer this kind of service for its larger enterprise customers?

I agree, this approach makes a lot of sense. The only thing that stretched credulity for me was the ordering web interface. Any semi-custom cpu order is still going to be wayyyyy more involved with a bunch of FAEs involved getting everything figured out with a customer. I wonder if they are incorporating Altera stuff for general purpose core interconnects.

Also it's probably not likely that Apple is one of the top clients for this, it'd be guys like Google, Alibaba, Amazon, Facebook, and yeah Microsoft (for azure stuff). These are CPUs that you'd probably never see outside of a hyperscale environment. Apple has some of that too but is a lot smaller than the main cloud dudes. But they do have a shitload of cash so who knows.

B-1.1.7 Bomber
Feb 19, 2005

THE DARK SIDE OF SCIENCE BREEDS A WEAPON OF WAR


Buglord

fat bossy gerbil posted:

Kaby Lake are the current (7th generation, ie 7000 series) Intel chips. If you're looking to buy now those are what you want.

Coffee Lake is 8th gen, they should release towards the end of 2017. It will offer a marginal increase in performance and consume somewhat less power. Intel claims they'll be 15% faster than Kaby Lake which means they'll be 5-10% faster in real world applications, as has been the case for the last five generation of Intel chips.

Intel processors with a K in the number (7600k etc.) can overclock, chips without the k don't. If you want to overclock get a Z series chipset, if you know you wont overclock and need an affordable board get an H series.

Chips with hyperthreading can run two threads on one core, chips without it have one thread per core.

Cannon Lake are the 9th gen chips scheduled for release sometime in the first half of 2018, they'll be the first 10nm chips but other than that little is known about them.

Thanks!

fishmech
Jul 16, 2006

by VideoGames


Salad Prong

silence_kit posted:

Why isn't it feasible? I certainly don't think that some guy in this thread is going to be able to afford a custom multi-chip-module assembly for his gaming rig, but why would it be unreasonable for Intel to offer this kind of service for its larger enterprise customers?

It's not that it'll be infeasible forever. It's that it's infeasible for a thing Intel would start offering tomorrow or even next month.

They'd need to convert over some existing production lines and figure out what way to make existing components more modular would work. Probably doable in a year if they really try, infeasible for the moment.

BIG HEADLINE
Jun 13, 2006

Make your move...'cause mine's gonna be ugly.

It should be noted that the price difference between the H270s and the low-to-mid-end Z270 boards is negligible, and you don't *need* to use a "K"-SKUed chip in them. Buying a Z270 also affords you the ability to pick up a discounted K CPU down the line, and no one knows how far you'll be able to stretch the board, since the next Core is still going to be a Skylake derivative.

Tokamak
Dec 22, 2004



silence_kit posted:

Why isn't it feasible? I certainly don't think that some guy in this thread is going to be able to afford a custom multi-chip-module assembly for his gaming rig, but why would it be unreasonable for Intel to offer this kind of service for its larger enterprise customers?

fishmech posted:

It's not that it'll be infeasible forever. It's that it's infeasible for a thing Intel would start offering tomorrow or even next month.

They'd need to convert over some existing production lines and figure out what way to make existing components more modular would work. Probably doable in a year if they really try, infeasible for the moment.

Yeah, I was a bit harsh with my words. It's not so much that it's infeasible (more like impractical), but it is not something that would be the basis for all, or most (if any) Cannonlake processors. They will have to add an assembly component to the production chain for a start. But there will also be other cost factors such as producing more photomasks for each component and the uncore, and having a larger volume of parts to test. There are also some technical considerations with regards to memory between different architectures, and thermal issues (memory gets hot if you have a GPU on the package). Not unsolvable problems, but complications.

It makes a lot of sense if you have plenty of fab capacity on older processes, and very little of and expensive new process. I can't speak to whether they have overcome the cost and technical hurdles, but it's not the sort of thing they would hide up their sleeve until launch. It is the sort of thing they will need to transition to, and there's no reason to hide it from AMD. It benefits them to demonstrate the technology and shop it around to garner interest. It will be a matter of execution, rather than getting an advantage by using secret technology.

There are two use-cases I can think of: HPC and EUV. I'm sure people would love to put a CPU and non-intel GPU on the same die, and cram more chips into their supercomputer. EUV is so behind and below projections that they would want to get as high of a yield as possible. If I had to speculate, Fab 42 would be a good opportunity to sort it out, but that is 3-4 years away. Intel hasn't disclosed the technology yet, though either option will likely have issues. It isn't as secretive as the article makes out. Many of the problems being faced today involved things discussed in my university physics classes a decade ago.

crazypenguin
Mar 9, 2005
nothing witty here, move along

Custom design of these multi-chips assemblies is going to be enterprise-only, but that method of manufacturing is going to be standard even for consumer chips before too long. (e.g. 5 years)

Tokamak posted:

EUV is so behind and below projections that they would want to get as high of a yield as possible.

More than that, too. HBM of course. Multiple configurations with GPU/FPGA. The main one they might be trying to treat as semi-secret here is silicon photonics. That process will never be the same one they use for compute, so a technique like this is absolutely necessary. So this is kinda the first step towards chips shooting light at each other, instead of electrical IO.

Crosby B. Alfred
May 20, 2006


fat bossy gerbil posted:

Kaby Lake are the current (7th generation, ie 7000 series) Intel chips. If you're looking to buy now those are what you want.

Coffee Lake is 8th gen, they should release towards the end of 2017. It will offer a marginal increase in performance and consume somewhat less power. Intel claims they'll be 15% faster than Kaby Lake which means they'll be 5-10% faster in real world applications, as has been the case for the last five generation of Intel chips.

Intel processors with a K in the number (7600k etc.) can overclock, chips without the k don't. If you want to overclock get a Z series chipset, if you know you wont overclock and need an affordable board get an H series.

Chips with hyperthreading can run two threads on one core, chips without it have one thread per core.

Cannon Lake are the 9th gen chips scheduled for release sometime in the first half of 2018, they'll be the first 10nm chips but other than that little is known about them.

Cannonlake isn't even a new architecture and we're probably stuck wait until 2019 for substantial performances gains until then it's just a slew of minor enhancements.

Which are nice but nothing terribly exciting.

sauer kraut
Oct 2, 2004



What's your usage profile and budget?
I haven't checked the part picking thread in a while, but for gaming the answer will probably involve this mainboard https://www.newegg.com/Product/Prod...N82E16813157740

and one of the following (Kaby Lake) CPUs
65$ Pentium G4560 - 2core/4thread, a feisty dual core that will run every older game and punch way above its price class. Good stopgap CPU if you're low on funds atm
240$ i5-7600K - 4core/4thread, classic gamers choice. Slap on a few 100MHz in the Bios'es EZ-overclock and you're good to go
350$ i7-7700K - 4core/8thread very similar to the above, but pre-overclocked and with hyperthreading. Debatable if the extra threads are useful for gamers, might be in the future.

jokes
Dec 20, 2012
jokes




Is it normal for my 6700k to go from 30C to 57C then back to 30C in the space of like a second? This spiking is making me think I did something wrong, maybe I misapplied my thermal paste?

DrDork
Dec 29, 2003
commanding officer of the Army of Dorkness

jokes posted:

Is it normal for my 6700k to go from 30C to 57C then back to 30C in the space of like a second? This spiking is making me think I did something wrong, maybe I misapplied my thermal paste?

Depending on what's going on with your system, yeah, maybe. If there's something that's repeatedly heavily loading the CPU every few seconds, it may very well do that. If you run a benchmark or otherwise heavily load it for a while and see that the temps stabilize at a reasonable place, then your cooling solution is probably fine.

Col.Kiwi
Dec 28, 2004
And the grave digger puts on the forceps...

jokes posted:

Is it normal for my 6700k to go from 30C to 57C then back to 30C in the space of like a second? This spiking is making me think I did something wrong, maybe I misapplied my thermal paste?
Spiking up means its under load for a second, being able to go back down quickly proves the cooler is working well. Nothing to worry about.

It's true if you want to be extra sure you can run a stress test for a while and make sure it stays somewhere reasonable.

GRINDCORE MEGGIDO
Feb 28, 1985




jokes posted:

Is it normal for my 6700k to go from 30C to 57C then back to 30C in the space of like a second? This spiking is making me think I did something wrong, maybe I misapplied my thermal paste?

When I first got my 6600K, I reapplied the heatsink three times as this behaviour worried me. If your max temps are good though, it seems normal.
On my 2500k this behaviour didn't happen anywhere near as fast - I'm assuming the small die size and the IHS goop / glue on Sklyake cause it to heat / cool much quicker.

I wonder if delidding and applying better paste, and removing the glue on skylake reduces this behavior (as well as improves temps).

DrDork
Dec 29, 2003
commanding officer of the Army of Dorkness

To some extent it would, yes. But at the same time, the physics of shrinking a core means that it naturally had a harder time dissipating the heat due to the reduced contact size it has with the heatsink. In either case, as long as it's not bumping up against thermal limits it's nothing to worry about.

GRINDCORE MEGGIDO
Feb 28, 1985




Ya, it's quite surprising coming from Sandy, isn't it.
Any UK goons have a delid tool, suitable for Skylake, they want to hire out to me?
Sorry for being off topic. I'm only going to use it once and am a cheapskate, please let me know if so.

GRINDCORE MEGGIDO fucked around with this message at 22:33 on Mar 3, 2017

Don Lapre
Mar 28, 2001

If you're having problems you're either holding the phone wrong or you have tiny girl hands.


jokes posted:

Is it normal for my 6700k to go from 30C to 57C then back to 30C in the space of like a second? This spiking is making me think I did something wrong, maybe I misapplied my thermal paste?

Yes. CPUs have very little surface area. It is normal.

track day bro!
Feb 17, 2005

#essereFerrari


Grimey Drawer

Stupid question, I should be able to run a 5820k and a 1070 on a good 550w seasonic psu at std clocks right?

BIG HEADLINE
Jun 13, 2006

Make your move...'cause mine's gonna be ugly.

track day bro! posted:

Stupid question, I should be able to run a 5820k and a 1070 on a good 550w seasonic psu at std clocks right?

Generally what I do is take stated TDP and double it (which isn't accurate as usually load is ~1.5x) for load - 5820K = 140W, 1070 = 150W. So using my rule, I'd eye a 650W PSU. You should be fine though, just be vigilant and if said Seasonic PSU is nearing the end of its warranty, bear in mind PSUs demonstrably *lose* efficiency over time and you might think of replacing it.

HalloKitty
Sep 30, 2005

Adjust the bass and let the Alpine blast


I'm sure a good quality 550W like a Seasonic will be fine, especially as you're at stock. As mentioned if it's getting really old you might want to upgrade, but the Seasonics generally have a hefty warranty.

HalloKitty fucked around with this message at 16:48 on Mar 4, 2017

Malcolm XML
Aug 8, 2009

I always knew it would end like this.


track day bro! posted:

Stupid question, I should be able to run a 5820k and a 1070 on a good 550w seasonic psu at std clocks right?

I run an oc 5820k and 980ti on 600w sfx so yes

track day bro!
Feb 17, 2005

#essereFerrari


Grimey Drawer

Hmmm it's about 4 years old and I wouldn't mind giving it a bit of an oc at some point so I guess I should get a 650w or a 700w one.

Watermelon Daiquiri
Jul 10, 2010




600w should be perfectly fine, hell 450 would probably cut it.

redeyes
Sep 14, 2002
I LOVE THE WHITE STRIPES!

Make sure and get a 1x 12v rail model. You do not want the older multiple 12v rail ones with modern video cards.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Josh Lyman
May 24, 2009





redeyes posted:

Make sure and get a 1x 12v rail model. You do not want the older multiple 12v rail ones with modern video cards.
My Antec Trupower Classic has 2x +12V rails

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply