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Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Perhaps you could tape over the gaps at gas o'clock and cut the tape each morning so you can open the window. Would also work to reseal a full plastic wrap and would be relatively inexpensive.

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Deadite
Aug 30, 2003

A fat guy, a watermelon, and a stack of magazines?
Family.


Elitist Bitch posted:

I live in an urban apartment. My windows are so poorly insulated/sealed I can smell weed, cigarettes, and every restaurant on the block. It's a rental so replacing the windows isn't an option (and we're moving out in four months anyway). The urgency is due to the fact that I have asthma and don't want to breathe in tear gas/pepper spray. Does anyone have any suggestions that don't involve plastic wrapping the whole window (the building has no AC and summer is coming) and is either removable or is something the landlord won't notice? They aren't doing "nonessential maintenance" due to the pandemic so I don't think I'd be able to get them to do anything about this.

When I lived in an apartment I used DAP Seal and Peel removable caulk to seal up leaky windows. Once your lease is up you can just peel the caulk out easily.

I also used this rope caulk to temporarily seal leaks, itís like a clay that you push into gaps. This one tends to leave a residue behind when you remove it though. Nothing permanent, but itís another thing to clean when youíre moving out.

https://www.amazon.com/18354-Seal-R...e/dp/B001QFZS6E

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Frost-K...-B2WT/100666131

taqueso
Mar 8, 2004









Fun Shoe

I'm looking for some flexible epoxy to use to repair a slash in a plastic panel. Was considering getting West System 650, as I know they are a respected brand, but I'd love to see any recommendations. I already have thickeners and other fillers.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




We have been visited by the travelling kitty pic sixer thread, post for kitty sixers
https://forums.somethingawful.com/s...hreadid=3917226

canyoneer
Sep 13, 2005


I only have canyoneyes for you


AFewBricksShy posted:

Glue and screw the backer to the plywood. (comb out thinset (get the premixed stuff) onto the plywood and then screw it down with a screw every 8".

slick the seams with the same thinset, put mesh tape into the thinset, then flat trowel the top of the tape to skim off the excess. Now you have a nice flat cement like floor.

If you want to do waterproofing you can (Here's a link to a big rear end effortpost I did on waterproofing in another thread), but it's probably not a world ending thing if you don't use it, most bathrooms prior to about 10 or so years ago probably don't have it.

I'm going to add to this and say that it's really important to use the right screw. Use the screws made for backerboard, not drywall screws. Screws need to be property countersunk so your tile isn't resting on the screw heads.
And don't screw to the joists. You want the plywood and backerboard to have the same level of flex, and screwing into the joist will throw that off.

There's a minimum coverage that the backerboard wants, so don't tetris a bunch of little pieces to fit around a sink or toilet. You want to make the sheets as big as you can.

TheManWithNoName
Oct 20, 2004

Cuz life sucks, kids. Get it while you can.

canyoneer posted:

I'm going to add to this and say that it's really important to use the right screw. Use the screws made for backerboard, not drywall screws. Screws need to be property countersunk so your tile isn't resting on the screw heads.
And don't screw to the joists. You want the plywood and backerboard to have the same level of flex, and screwing into the joist will throw that off.

There's a minimum coverage that the backerboard wants, so don't tetris a bunch of little pieces to fit around a sink or toilet. You want to make the sheets as big as you can.

It's a small bathroom (the tiled area is like 60x66") so hopefully I can get away with just a couple big sheets. The plumbing is weird if you look at the pics but those are the only cuts I am planning on making.

Will do with the screws, thanks.

devicenull
May 30, 2007


Grimey Drawer

Deadite posted:

When I lived in an apartment I used DAP Seal and Peel removable caulk to seal up leaky windows. Once your lease is up you can just peel the caulk out easily.

I also used this rope caulk to temporarily seal leaks, itís like a clay that you push into gaps. This one tends to leave a residue behind when you remove it though. Nothing permanent, but itís another thing to clean when youíre moving out.

https://www.amazon.com/18354-Seal-R...e/dp/B001QFZS6E

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Frost-K...-B2WT/100666131

Rope caulk for joints that need to move, foam tape at the top and bottom of the window, clear silicon caulk (or white if the surfaces are already white) around anything that doesn't move.

If you spend some time on the caulk you won't need to undo it (and no one will ever notice). I wouldn't expect anyone to notice the foam tape either.

Make sure you caulk around the trim on the windows too, air could be coming in under that.

Note that tear gas is powder, and will linger around for several days (or until it rains)

canyoneer
Sep 13, 2005


I only have canyoneyes for you


TheManWithNoName posted:

It's a small bathroom (the tiled area is like 60x66") so hopefully I can get away with just a couple big sheets. The plumbing is weird if you look at the pics but those are the only cuts I am planning on making.

Will do with the screws, thanks.

Self quoting for what NOT to do

canyoneer posted:



Some facebook DIY wtf tiling.

Let's jigsaw these 6 pieces all together with no gaps. Let's also not tape and mortar the gaps, just start slapping the 18x6 tiles right on top of it.

Hope they had fun doing it, because they will get to do it again in a few years.

Very bad planning! 6 pieces, including tiny little 5 inch slivers on the sides and end

tater_salad
Sep 15, 2007


Wow holy poo poo I've never done that and would use 2 close to 1/2 sheets to make it fit better not just drop in tiny slivers those fuckers will be prime for cracking.

TheManWithNoName
Oct 20, 2004

Cuz life sucks, kids. Get it while you can.

Another subfloor question. So this is the low spot that was right next to the tub. I tore out the thin section and it looks like the 2x4 isn't connected to anything but the other piece of plywood? I have no idea how far under the tub the larger section of plywood goes at this point. My first thought was to replace the 2x with a piece that actually connects to the other 2xs and connect those to the beam on the left. Is that too janky?


edit: gently caress is this some beammaster j poo poo what the gently caress

TheManWithNoName fucked around with this message at 03:39 on Jun 4, 2020

DrBouvenstein
Feb 28, 2007

I think I'm a doctor, but that doesn't make me a doctor. This fancy avatar does.


Deadite posted:

This is probably a stupid question but can you buy lengths of hose to use as a drain? I bought a dehumidifier that has a hookup for a hose drain, and all the photos just show a cut garden hose. I donít have an old hose to cut up though. Do I just buy a new hose for this?

Speaking of dehumidifiers, one came with my home purchased last fall. Used it the remainder of fall (half of sep, and oct and nov, stopped for winter when it was dry) and starting to use it again now.

Only now, for some reason, it keeps icing over. It didn't do that before. The temp in my basement is about the same as it was i nthe mid to late fall, like upper 50's to 60, so I don't think it's too cold down there.

I don't want to have to put it on a timer, cause it already just goes on and off based on humidity levels, but even with that it runs forever until it ices so much it triggers some sort of alert.

B-Nasty
May 25, 2005



DrBouvenstein posted:

Speaking of dehumidifiers, one came with my home purchased last fall. Used it the remainder of fall (half of sep, and oct and nov, stopped for winter when it was dry) and starting to use it again now.

Only now, for some reason, it keeps icing over. It didn't do that before. The temp in my basement is about the same as it was i nthe mid to late fall, like upper 50's to 60, so I don't think it's too cold down there.

I don't want to have to put it on a timer, cause it already just goes on and off based on humidity levels, but even with that it runs forever until it ices so much it triggers some sort of alert.

What do you have the target humidity set at? It's not great if you set that lower than can be (reasonably) achieved by the dehumidifier. That is, it shouldn't be running the compressor 24/7.

About the only other thing you can check is airflow: clean the filter, check the fan, and if possible, clean the coils inside with compressed air.

Nevets
Sep 11, 2002

Be they sad or be they well,
I'll make their lives a hell


It's probably much more humid now than it was in the fall, so it's running more often. Also you might have something new adding to the humidity, like water coming in through the foundation.

Killed a Girl in 96
Jun 15, 2001



Lipstick Apathy

Sometime later this year or even next year I'm going to be removing all my concrete walkway and putting in a new stone path. And maybe next year I'll be starting building a garage with a cement pad. So I was looking at cement mixers, and then only thing I could find that I could get for less than about a hundred bucks is this:

Off an auction site, old as poo poo, but it looks big. But I've never used one before, and have no idea if that's gas-powered or not. Should I just ante-up and drop three hundred on a low-end mixer, or do you think this thing will work?

eddiewalker
Apr 27, 2004


Killed a Girl in 96 posted:

Sometime later this year or even next year I'm going to be removing all my concrete walkway and putting in a new stone path. And maybe next year I'll be starting building a garage with a cement pad. So I was looking at cement mixers, and then only thing I could find that I could get for less than about a hundred bucks is this:

Off an auction site, old as poo poo, but it looks big. But I've never used one before, and have no idea if that's gas-powered or not. Should I just ante-up and drop three hundred on a low-end mixer, or do you think this thing will work?

That thing is hacky and homemade. It doesnít even have a power source, so add the cost of a motor or small engine.

Just pay HF $175 then recoup most of your costs unloading it on Craigslist when youíre done.


https://www.hfqpdb.com/best_coupon/...T.+CEMENT+MIXER

Killed a Girl in 96
Jun 15, 2001



Lipstick Apathy

eddiewalker posted:

That thing is hacky and homemade. It doesnít even have a power source, so add the cost of a motor or small engine.

Just pay HF $175 then recoup most of your costs unloading it on Craigslist when youíre done.


https://www.hfqpdb.com/best_coupon/...T.+CEMENT+MIXER

Okay that is super helpful. I wasn't sure if that thing had a power source, so if it doesn't it, no thx.

yippee cahier
Mar 28, 2005



Wedge Regret

Yeah, looks like thereís a place to bolt a motor on the left side and connect the belt to.

nwin
Feb 25, 2002

make's u think


Fallen Rib

I posted this in the HVAC thread but that doesnít seem to move much:


I need some help understanding a humidistat and a whole-house humidifier.

I just moved into a rental in northern Virginia with one and the landlord says he just leaves the setting at 30% all year and it seems to work fine. But going by the directions on the humidifier, that doesnít seem correct.

It gets very humid here in the summer and my old townhouse without a humidifier would get very dry in the winter.

As I see it, I donít need the thing on in the summer, right? What effect would that have on the AC unit though?




Last, thereís an electronic air cleaner:


Iím used to just putting an air filter in every 3 months. Is this different at all? What changes with it being electronic?

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Caveat that I'm not experienced with HVAC systems, assuming it's capable of increasing and decreasing the humidity I'd suggest sticking it on whatever setting gives you 50%RH in your most-used rooms of the house, especially the bedroom. You may want to get some independent hygrometers for each room.

50%RH is commonly the target for human comfort regardless of the temperature (the R in RH is "relative to the temperature"). 40 to 60% is usually a good target range.

nwin
Feb 25, 2002

make's u think


Fallen Rib

Jaded Burnout posted:

Caveat that I'm not experienced with HVAC systems, assuming it's capable of increasing and decreasing the humidity I'd suggest sticking it on whatever setting gives you 50%RH in your most-used rooms of the house, especially the bedroom. You may want to get some independent hygrometers for each room.

50%RH is commonly the target for human comfort regardless of the temperature (the R in RH is "relative to the temperature"). 40 to 60% is usually a good target range.

Thatís how Iím interpreting it...if itís set for 30%, that means the AC would have to run more in the summer to get that low.

Slugworth
Feb 18, 2001

If two grown men can't make a pervert happy for a few minutes in order to watch a film about zombies, then maybe we should all just move to Iran!


nwin posted:

That’s how I’m interpreting it...if it’s set for 30%, that means the AC would have to run more in the summer to get that low.
AC is a dehumidifier, so unless your air is getting unbearably dry with the ac running, you shouldn't be re-humidifying your house.

That being said, leaving it at 30% during the summer means that it probably won't ever turn on anyways. Keep in mind, the humidistat doesn't *drop* your humidity, it only kicks on when it gets below the set level.

Slugworth fucked around with this message at 12:41 on Jun 5, 2020

nwin
Feb 25, 2002

make's u think


Fallen Rib

Slugworth posted:

AC is a dehumidifier, so unless your air is getting unbearably dry with the ac running, you shouldn't be re-humidifying your house.

That being said, leaving it at 30% during the summer means that it probably won't ever turn on anyways. Keep in mind, the humidistat doesn't *drop* your humidity, it only kicks on when it gets below the set level.

Ah....

So in reality, I can leave it at 30% during the summer, it during the winter Iíll probably bump it up to around 40%.

I need to see if this thing has a filter or anything to clean. The owner said he changed the air filter every 6 months which seems like a long time (he also had 3 dogs), but he just left the humidifier alone, so Iím worried zero maintenance has been done to that part.

tater_salad
Sep 15, 2007


Turn your humidifier off in the Summer is what I was told by my havac installer.

Then set it in the winter for comfort.

big crush on Chad OMG
Feb 22, 2005





Honestly Iíd be surprised if either of those were actually still working. I have both an electronic air cleaner and a humidifier on my furnace and neither work. Just use a nice filter. Itís very humid here so I have no desire to add more humidity to the air, even in winter.

They seemed to be in fashion for a period of time but not used anymore.

DrBouvenstein
Feb 28, 2007

I think I'm a doctor, but that doesn't make me a doctor. This fancy avatar does.


B-Nasty posted:

What do you have the target humidity set at? It's not great if you set that lower than can be (reasonably) achieved by the dehumidifier. That is, it shouldn't be running the compressor 24/7.

About the only other thing you can check is airflow: clean the filter, check the fan, and if possible, clean the coils inside with compressed air.

Well, you were right. Previously, even if I turned it on and off, it would go to the level I set it at (55%,) but I guess unplugging and plugging it back in reset that setting to it was set to the max (well..lowest...you know what I mean) of 30%.

With the rain we've had lately, and just one dehumidifier (so far, I need to get a second, and then get them to auto-drain so I don't lug up buckets of water) no way can it get to that level.

It's been fine in the couple days since setting it to 55%.

CzarChasm
Mar 14, 2009

Blah Blah Blah
Look at me
I'm the Goddamn Batman
Blah Blah Blah


So, I had a problem which was solved, but it lead me to another question.

The lights in my garage door opener started to slowly burn out and fail, even when they were new in box bulbs. Eventually they stopped working all together and my garage was very dark.

I called the company that (presumably) installed the door originally and very kindly, before I wasted any money, they advised me to try incandescent bulbs instead of LED. That worked, and I'm pretty happy with that, but I'm kind of surprised. First, why would LED bulbs not work in a garage door opener (or any other fixture for that matter)? I asked the woman on the line about it and apparently the garage door industry has been very slow manufacturing LED compatible units, but what's so special about the fixtures inside those versus a lamp? They both plug in to standard grounded outlets (120v?) and I don't think these bulbs were deformed or differently shaped from incandescent. Just a curiosity.

rndmnmbr
Jul 3, 2012



I could see the motor playing merry hell with LEDs. Incandescent-replacement LEDs, especially cheap ones, expect a clean 120v 60Hz sine wave, and really don't like voltage sags or noisy power. Same reason you need dimmer-rated LEDs or LED-rated dimmers, they just don't work the same way incandescents do.

e. Also, unheated garage I assume? LEDs don't like cold, at least not for long. Incandescents don't either, but at least they're self-heating.

rndmnmbr fucked around with this message at 21:39 on Jun 5, 2020

Stack Machine
Mar 6, 2016

I can see through time!


Fun Shoe

CzarChasm posted:

So, I had a problem which was solved, but it lead me to another question.

The lights in my garage door opener started to slowly burn out and fail, even when they were new in box bulbs. Eventually they stopped working all together and my garage was very dark.

I called the company that (presumably) installed the door originally and very kindly, before I wasted any money, they advised me to try incandescent bulbs instead of LED. That worked, and I'm pretty happy with that, but I'm kind of surprised. First, why would LED bulbs not work in a garage door opener (or any other fixture for that matter)? I asked the woman on the line about it and apparently the garage door industry has been very slow manufacturing LED compatible units, but what's so special about the fixtures inside those versus a lamp? They both plug in to standard grounded outlets (120v?) and I don't think these bulbs were deformed or differently shaped from incandescent. Just a curiosity.

Is the garage climate controlled? If not, perhaps outdoor rated LED bulbs would fare better. Temperature cycling and humidity/condensation is tougher on circuit boards than it is on incandescent bulbs. The outdoor rated ones will usually have conformal coatings or wider spacing or other design considerations to try to combat this.

Stack Machine fucked around with this message at 21:51 on Jun 5, 2020

LargeHadron
May 19, 2009

They say, "you mean it's just sounds?" thinking that for something to just be a sound is to be useless, whereas I love sounds just as they are, and I have no need for them to be anything more than what they are.


Well it wasn't asbestos so that's good

H110Hawk
Dec 28, 2006


LargeHadron posted:

Well it wasn't asbestos so that's good

Anything else you found?

LargeHadron
May 19, 2009

They say, "you mean it's just sounds?" thinking that for something to just be a sound is to be useless, whereas I love sounds just as they are, and I have no need for them to be anything more than what they are.


H110Hawk posted:

Anything else you found?

No

Stack Machine
Mar 6, 2016

I can see through time!


Fun Shoe

Stack Machine posted:

So... does anybody have any experience with sinkholes and related phenomena? Mrs. Machine found like a 1 inch diameter hole in the yard and noted that the stick she inserted into it vanished and made a deep splashing sound. I excavated it with the post-hole diggers I bought to replace my mailbox and found a little water-filled hole. The water is only about 3 inches deep now. This is probably 20 feet from where the city very recently excavated and filled a large sinkhole. Could this just be a leftover from that? Should I be poking around down there and checking for a collapsed sewer lateral? Attache photo of a water-filled hole is probably not very helpful, but this is what I'm looking at. I've capped it off with a giant concrete block for now but I'm at a loss as to what to do long-term.



Update: I've covered the hole with a massive concrete block I had on hand and today I peered in while walking the dog and there was a crayfish in it. Apparently burrowing crayfish are a thing here. Might be the source of the hole. Might be a victim of the hole.

kid sinister
Nov 16, 2002


My vote is "victim", otherwise that is one hell of an ambitious burrowing crayfish you have there.

In other news, I could use some help. I've got a dryer problem that I've never seen before. It's a Kenmore and it runs, but it doesn't get hot. The last few times that happened at our stores it was the heating element burnt out. I tried a brand new heating element in it and it still won't get hot. Could that be the thermostat that mounts on the side of the heating element?

Final Blog Entry
Jun 23, 2006

"Love us with money or we'll hate you with hammers!"

kid sinister posted:

My vote is "victim", otherwise that is one hell of an ambitious burrowing crayfish you have there.

In other news, I could use some help. I've got a dryer problem that I've never seen before. It's a Kenmore and it runs, but it doesn't get hot. The last few times that happened at our stores it was the heating element burnt out. I tried a brand new heating element in it and it still won't get hot. Could that be the thermostat that mounts on the side of the heating element?

Does it have a thermal fuse that could have popped?

Final Blog Entry fucked around with this message at 23:52 on Jun 5, 2020

kid sinister
Nov 16, 2002


Final Blog Entry posted:

Does it have a thermal fuse that could have popped?

If the thermal fuse blew, then it wouldn't even spin. It spins.

Corla Plankun
May 8, 2007

improve the lives of everyone


How do you know it wouldn't spin?

Mine had a thermal fuse out and it wouldn't ever turn on the heat, just like yours. That would be my first guess and the part was pretty cheap and easy to install if I remember correctly.

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Stack Machine
Mar 6, 2016

I can see through time!


Fun Shoe

The service manual is likely available online from the manufacturer. That's the case with my washer/dryer. It'll give you a list of specific parts to check if the dryer doesn't get hot.

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