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Stringent
Dec 22, 2004

The internet is the universal sewer.


kaesarsosei posted:

I have a few requests which might seem all over the place.

As I get older I feel like I enjoy fantasy less and less. The last fantasy series I enjoyed was the First Law trilogy by Joe Abercombie and before/during/after that (lol), A Song of Ice and Fire. I just decided to try Wheel of Time and literally put it down after the prologue in the first book - I just don't know if I can get into it. So, a) is it worth sticking with WoT and, b) are there other fantasy series I should consider?

I am also finding it hard to get into sci-fi and as a result have read very little recently. I really enjoyed most of the Culture series by Banks and Hyperion by Dan Simmons. But I recently tried Revelation Space which I couldn't get into. It feels like I prefer the super-grand scope of Culture books.

Finally, and maybe as I get older this is what I am really after, I would like some suggestions for something like a thriller or detective/crime story. Authors I have my eye on are James Patterson and Michael Connelly. Can anyone recommend stuff like that? For reference, I read a few Jack Reacher books but they are a little too cheesy/over-the-top for what I am really looking for.

asimov robot novels

Cheese Thief posted:

Talk to me about Dostoyevsky. Which should I read?? Which Translation as well? I've read Crime and Punishment, the Coulson Translation, a long time ago and just loved it. I had been trying to read Neuromancer but I just don't care about the setting or the characters, maybe someday it will grab me. I've read a bit of The Possessed which I really liked. People say bad things about P&V translations, like it's not accurate and a dumber version. Constance Garnett is just a little old timey for me, I'd rather get something more modern.

karamazov for me

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yaffle
Sep 15, 2002

Flapdoodle

Kerro posted:

This sounds amazing and I too greatly enjoy reading about other people having a terrible time (as long as it's not an outright traumatising time)

Skip the third one then, I read it, and it is amazing, but also very traumatic.

err
Apr 11, 2005


I just finished "A Fine Balance" by Rohinton Mistry. Anything similar? Something with endearing characters struggling through hardship.

Captain Monkey
Aug 23, 2007



I assume youíve read the similar-ish The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy?

BurningBeard
May 10, 2013


Where would one go next with Ishiguro after Never Let Me Go and The Remains of the Day?

Sekenr
Dec 12, 2013






I dont remember if it was this thread that recommended to me the Songs of a dead dreamer and grimscribe but thank you. I am blown away. Started off as merely "yeah not bad" but now in the middle of Masquerade of a Dead Sword and this is cool as gently caress.

To give you a quote:

And the voices from their lacerated mouths, so clear, so precise to my ears that every word is a bright flash in my dreaming brain, brilliant new coin minted for the treasure house of hell.

And other:

I am an offspring of the dead. I am descended from the deceased. I am the progeny of phantoms. My ancestors are the illustrious multitudes of the defunct, grand and innumerable. My lineage is longer than time. My name is written in embalming fluid in the book of death. A noble race is mine.

Sekenr fucked around with this message at 08:09 on Mar 2, 2021

Hieronymous Alloy
Jan 30, 2009


Why! Why!! Why must you refuse to accept that Dr. Hieronymous Alloy's Genetically Enhanced Cream Corn Is Superior to the Leading Brand on the Market!?!



Morbid Hound

https://twitter.com/alloy_dr/status/1366723717502533634?s=20

Mr. Nemo
Feb 4, 2016

A roc and a hard place



A couple weeks ago I asked for recommendations about "creative" book formats, books that work better in a phyiscal format than in a Kindel. I got some good recomendations.

I discovered Goodreads (i know) user lists function. And found quite a few more. Here's one example of a list, there were a couple others like it, but shorter:

https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/7176.Books_with_Innovative_Book_Design_Structure#24800

Not all the books are good mind you, or even fit the criteria, but it was a good source.

I also found this best covers list lmao:

https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/101.Best_Book_Cover_Art?page=1

Twilight has 2 spots in the top 5.

rollick
Mar 20, 2009


I'd like to read the One Thousand and One Nights this year. Does anyone have a favourite version?

The Burton has this criticism in the Wikipedia article:

quote:

It has, however, been criticized for its "archaic language and extravagant idiom" and "obsessive focus on sexuality" (and has even been called an "eccentric ego-trip" and a "highly personal reworking of the text").[49]

which I guess is a bad thing.

It would be nice to get an attractive physical version, maybe with illustrations.

Hieronymous Alloy
Jan 30, 2009


Why! Why!! Why must you refuse to accept that Dr. Hieronymous Alloy's Genetically Enhanced Cream Corn Is Superior to the Leading Brand on the Market!?!



Morbid Hound

rollick posted:

I'd like to read the One Thousand and One Nights this year. Does anyone have a favourite version?

The Burton has this criticism in the Wikipedia article:


which I guess is a bad thing.

It would be nice to get an attractive physical version, maybe with illustrations.

I think there may be some posts on this exact topic away up-thread in the mists of time, it's osmething I know we've talked about before.

My personal favorite edition is the translation by Edward Powys Mathers, based on the french translation of Mardrus. I like it for a few reasons. The first is Powys Mathers was a skilled poet in in his own right and he does a really good job of expressing everything in a wonderfully lush style (Steinbeck quotes some of Powys Mather's poetry in his novel Cannery Row). It's still heavily orientalized and eroticized but it's more poetic and just better written than Burton's and I think gives more of what the typical reader of the 1001 nights is looking for. The second reason is that it's structured better (imho) than the Burton version, with clear breaks every "night" where Scheherazade "saw the approach of dawn and discreetly fell silent. . . . but on the four hundred and fifty fourth night she began again . . . "

One thing to be aware of is that if you're reading a traditional version there's a lot of racism and a lot of sex and a lot of stuff that's not at all remotely ok especially to modern audiences and that's just part of the landscape with these stories.


edit: here's where we last discussed this, in 2011: https://forums.somethingawful.com/showthread.php?noseen=1&threadid=3147139&pagenumber=82&perpage=40#post395024192


The takeaway is probably Mathers for prose style, Haddawy for accuracy.

Hieronymous Alloy fucked around with this message at 19:07 on Mar 19, 2021

rollick
Mar 20, 2009


Thanks man . I keep forgetting we can search within threads now.

Hieronymous Alloy
Jan 30, 2009


Why! Why!! Why must you refuse to accept that Dr. Hieronymous Alloy's Genetically Enhanced Cream Corn Is Superior to the Leading Brand on the Market!?!



Morbid Hound

rollick posted:

Thanks man . I keep forgetting we can search within threads now.

Oh no it was good to ask again. Ten years ago I wouldn't have thought to give the "be aware, these versions are *absurdly* problematic in every way imaginable" warning.

Hyrax Attack!
Jan 13, 2009

We demand to be taken seriously


Looking for investigative journalism book, like I really enjoyed Bad Blood, Super Pumped, and Bottle of Lies.

tuyop
Sep 14, 2006

Every second that we're not growing BASIL is a second wasted


Fun Shoe

Hyrax Attack! posted:

Looking for investigative journalism book, like I really enjoyed Bad Blood, Super Pumped, and Bottle of Lies.

Have you read Tomís River yet?

Walh Hara
May 11, 2012


Hyrax Attack! posted:

Looking for investigative journalism book, like I really enjoyed Bad Blood, Super Pumped, and Bottle of Lies.

Flash Boys by Lewis

Hyrax Attack!
Jan 13, 2009

We demand to be taken seriously


tuyop posted:

Have you read Tomís River yet?

Walh Hara posted:

Flash Boys by Lewis

These both look great, thanks!

Lex Neville
Apr 15, 2009


The Paperboy by Pete Dexter

feedmyleg
Dec 25, 2004

EVERY FAIRY TALE NEEDS ITS HERO.



Been on a pre-history kick lately and would love some suggestions of fiction books about ancient peoples. Reading The Inheritors right now and digging it. It would be great to have something with more of an adventure tone to it, though. Anything pre-bronze age would be ideal—neolithic, megalithic, cave people, etc. I'm even good with slightly fantastical takes with magic or whatnot as long as it fits the vibe. Pre-civilization is more what I'm after, but also good with following people living, say, a hunter-gatherer or nomadic lifestyle outside of an existing civilization. Or just anything that's really good adjacent to those ideas (Raptor Red comes to mind).

Bilirubin
Feb 16, 2014

The sanctioned action is to CHUG!!!




Bleak Gremlin

feedmyleg posted:

Been on a pre-history kick lately and would love some suggestions of fiction books about ancient peoples. Reading The Inheritors right now and digging it. It would be great to have something with more of an adventure tone to it, though. Anything pre-bronze age would be ideal—neolithic, megalithic, cave people, etc. I'm even good with slightly fantastical takes with magic or whatnot as long as it fits the vibe. Pre-civilization is more what I'm after, but also good with following people living, say, a hunter-gatherer or nomadic lifestyle outside of an existing civilization. Or just anything that's really good adjacent to those ideas (Raptor Red comes to mind).

"Raptor Red" and "real good" don't belong in the same sentence.

The Clan of the Cave Bear series immediately springs to mind. Its not high literature or anything nor terribly accurate with the latest archaeology but you are looking for a fairly narrow niche

e. honestly, the best I can think of is Cundiff's Britain Begins, which is history not fiction but its really interesting and hews with the latest (at the time of publication) scholarship

Bilirubin fucked around with this message at 18:50 on Mar 27, 2021

feedmyleg
Dec 25, 2004

EVERY FAIRY TALE NEEDS ITS HERO.



Haha fair, I haven't read Raptor Red since I was 11 so I might have some rose-tinted glasses there. Cave Bear is what I saw on a handful of lists so I'll pop it on next. Non-fiction isn't really what I'm looking for since I have plenty of that in documentary and podcast form at the moment. Thanks!

feedmyleg fucked around with this message at 20:39 on Mar 27, 2021

tuyop
Sep 14, 2006

Every second that we're not growing BASIL is a second wasted


Fun Shoe

Thatís a tricky one but both Sarum and Russka have maybe 10-20% of the books take place in prehistoric times and might scratch your itch.

yaffle
Sep 15, 2002

Flapdoodle

feedmyleg posted:

Been on a pre-history kick lately and would love some suggestions of fiction books about ancient peoples. Reading The Inheritors right now and digging it. It would be great to have something with more of an adventure tone to it, though. Anything pre-bronze age would be ideal—neolithic, megalithic, cave people, etc. I'm even good with slightly fantastical takes with magic or whatnot as long as it fits the vibe. Pre-civilization is more what I'm after, but also good with following people living, say, a hunter-gatherer or nomadic lifestyle outside of an existing civilization. Or just anything that's really good adjacent to those ideas (Raptor Red comes to mind).

I really liked "Shamen" by Kim Stanley Robinson. Edit: "To the ice age" by Rien Poortvliet is sort of fiction, an illustrated history of The Netherlands starting at the present day and going back to the ice age, by the guy who illustrated the Gnomes book.

yaffle fucked around with this message at 12:21 on Mar 28, 2021

ulmont
Sep 15, 2010

IF I EVER MISS VOTING IN AN ELECTION (EVEN AMERICAN IDOL) ,OR HAVE UNPAID PARKING TICKETS, PLEASE TAKE AWAY MY FRANCHISE


Bilirubin posted:

The Clan of the Cave Bear series immediately springs to mind. Its not high literature or anything

...The "Fifty Shades of Grey" erotica-adjacent series of an earlier generation, is more how I'd describe The Clan of the Cave Bear series.

FPyat
Jan 17, 2020


Are there any fiction books that discuss DMT trips?

Mrenda
Mar 14, 2012



FPyat posted:

Are there any fiction books that discuss DMT trips?

Threshold by Rob Doyle. It's also really well written.

Edit: It's a book about a dude wandering around Europe (and further afield,) thinking about writing and reading, fantasizing and wanking over his (adult) students, taking drugs and thinking about them, going on spiritual voyages, pissing in fetishists mouths in German night clubs, etc.

Mrenda fucked around with this message at 14:25 on Mar 30, 2021

schwein11
Oct 13, 2009





I have never read Jane Austen and I want to rectify that. Should I just start with Sense and Sensibility and go on from there with publication order?

Hieronymous Alloy
Jan 30, 2009


Why! Why!! Why must you refuse to accept that Dr. Hieronymous Alloy's Genetically Enhanced Cream Corn Is Superior to the Leading Brand on the Market!?!



Morbid Hound

schwein11 posted:

I have never read Jane Austen and I want to rectify that. Should I just start with Sense and Sensibility and go on from there with publication order?

No, start here: https://forums.somethingawful.com/showthread.php?threadid=3662001&pagenumber=1&perpage=40

Reading Austen is deceptively challenging. It seems like her prose is easy to read, and each word by itself is, but there’s a massive amount of background information that you need for the humor and story to make sense -- imagine trying to show Avengers:Endgame to someone from 200 years ago with no explanation.

That thread will get you over the hard part of acclimating to the world of her books and once you've done that you can read any of them.

Franchescanado
Feb 23, 2013

I AM A STUPIDLY SEXY WOLFMAN



Grimey Drawer

schwein11 posted:

I have never read Jane Austen and I want to rectify that. Should I just start with Sense and Sensibility and go on from there with publication order?

Pride & Prejudice rules and has a lot of humor.

Humerus
Jul 7, 2009

Rule of acquisition #111:
Treat people in your debt like family...exploit them.




Franchescanado posted:

Pride & Prejudice rules and has a lot of humor.



I don't know they make a compelling case
(I've never read any Austen)

Kart Barfunkel
Nov 10, 2009



Whatís the best way to get into the works of Carl Jung? I wanna understand this subconscious poo poo, what exactly it means for something to be Ďjungianí straight from the horses mouth.

TommyGun85
Jun 5, 2013


Kart Barfunkel posted:

What’s the best way to get into the works of Carl Jung? I wanna understand this subconscious poo poo, what exactly it means for something to be ‘jungian’ straight from the horses mouth.

Modern Man in Search of a Soul or Man and His Symbols.

Blue Labrador
Feb 17, 2011

I appreciate your willingness to press your advantage. That shows confidence!

I'm actually invincible on disadvantage, but that's a trait unique to Dandies like myself.

Don't feel discouraged!

I studied literature in college a couple years ago, and--after a period of burnout--I've just started getting back on the quality reading horse, but I would love more recommendations. My favorite author is Nathaneal West with Miss Lonelyhearts being my favorite novella of his (though Day of the Locust is great as well). Can anyone recommend cutting, satiric works with an economic edge like that to me? I love his prose as well, so if that is similar, but the topics are different, I'm okay with that as well.

AngusPodgorny
Jun 3, 2004

Please to be restful, it is only a puffin that has from the puffin place outbroken.

Humerus posted:



I don't know they make a compelling case
(I've never read any Austen)
I'm reading Pride and Prejudice right now and it's just going to each other's houses, but it also rules.

It also seems like a fine starting point, but I haven't read any other Austen to compare.

TommyGun85
Jun 5, 2013


AngusPodgorny posted:

I'm reading Pride and Prejudice right now and it's just going to each other's houses, but it also rules.

It also seems like a fine starting point, but I haven't read any other Austen to compare.

Every Austen book ends the same way: they get married

Selachian
Oct 9, 2012



Blue Labrador posted:

I studied literature in college a couple years ago, and--after a period of burnout--I've just started getting back on the quality reading horse, but I would love more recommendations. My favorite author is Nathaneal West with Miss Lonelyhearts being my favorite novella of his (though Day of the Locust is great as well). Can anyone recommend cutting, satiric works with an economic edge like that to me? I love his prose as well, so if that is similar, but the topics are different, I'm okay with that as well.

If you liked Day of the Locust I think you'd also like Budd Schulberg's What Makes Sammy Run?

Take the plunge! Okay!
Feb 24, 2007




Blue Labrador posted:

I studied literature in college a couple years ago, and--after a period of burnout--I've just started getting back on the quality reading horse, but I would love more recommendations. My favorite author is Nathaneal West with Miss Lonelyhearts being my favorite novella of his (though Day of the Locust is great as well). Can anyone recommend cutting, satiric works with an economic edge like that to me? I love his prose as well, so if that is similar, but the topics are different, I'm okay with that as well.

John Fante hits a lot of the same points as West IMO. His four Bandini books are very good, and the main character does move to LA in search of success eventually. Not that much satire in Fante, but there definitely are similarities in prose.

Karenina
Jul 9, 2013



Books for understanding evangelicalism in the US? For what it's worth, I didn't grow up in a Christian household and can't tell one Protestant denomination from another.

evilpicard
Sep 11, 2006
<font size=4><B>I REPORT POSTS FROM FOUR YEARS AGO</b></font>



If you're interested in the intersection of evangelicism and American politics Jeff Sharlet's The Family is great, also good is Blumenthal's Republican Gomorrah. For something more historical Frances Fitzgerald The Evamgicals, but I haven't finished it yet.

Vei
Jan 29, 2007


Looking for a thriller or mystery recommendation that has as heavy of an emphasis on realistic finance/accounting/banking/etc. as possible, if anyone has any!

I have read The Social Climber's Handbook which was thoroughly enjoyable, but more of a lighthearted "fun" read and not quite in-the-weeds enough for what I'm looking for.

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PatMarshall
Apr 6, 2009



I don't know of any fictional thrillers in that vein, but there are plenty of true crime style accounts of business scandals that could work. Try Liar' Poker by Michael Lewis about his days on the bond trading desk in the 80's, Barbarians at the Gate, about the biggest levereged buyout to date (at the time) when management tried to take RJR Nabisco private, and of course the Smartest Guys in the Room about Enron. More recently, Bad Blood about Theranos was really good.

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