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corgski
Feb 6, 2007



Muffinpox posted:

Revolvyerom in, Funny out.

Like the apex seals in a rotary engine.

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corgski
Feb 6, 2007



Except the pressure will never be zero, it will only approach zero. At a certain point, hydrogen will diffuse through the walls of the vacuum chamber, making it impossible to go any lower.

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



Poing posted:

What? Are you telling me that we can't get all those atoms out of the way?

Yup. As the pressure drops below a certain point, more hydrogen will diffuse through the walls of the chamber until it reaches an equilibrium point where the pump is using all its power just to maintain the vacuum.

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



Yes there is:

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



Unfortunately, I don't have any spectacular photos of it, other than a puddle of mineral oil and refrigerant under the passenger seat, but the blower motor on my old Blazer burnt up today, and melted a refrigerant line and/or the condenser, among other things - which conveniently put the fire out, as all the r12 evaporated and displaced the oxygen that was feeding the fire.

I even drove the thing back to my house, so I can get it towed to my father's garage at my leisure.

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



Ahaha, that would have made for a much better story, but unfortunately, the damage is localized to under the dash and glove compartment where the squirrel cage sits.

I should stick a supercharger on it though, since I'm going to be ripping apart and replacing the entire front end at the same time. drat thing survived being t-boned in the front drivers side corner at 40mph by a cab and drove away from that too. The late 80s S-10 platform was a veritable tank.

corgski fucked around with this message at 05:14 on Feb 9, 2011

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



Godholio posted:

Where, not what. I'm assuming it's not supposed to be dangling in the middle of everything.

Looks like a perfectly logical place for a remote filter to me. Better than most manufacturers do anyway.

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



LO Technology posted:

Remote oil filters shouldn't even be in your car. It's not convenient or environmentally correct.

I'll take a filter somewhere where I can get a strap wrench around it any day over a filter jammed up in between the fork of the Y-pipe.

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



Well christ, BMW owners have an image to keep up, you know.

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



Plus I'm sure the local fire department loved having an excuse to actually use their foam, considering most places end up just dumping it on car fires before it goes bad in the tanks.

(Or they could have been boring and used a class D extinguisher or sand, but the former are loving expensive and the latter was probably unfeasible given the amount of metal there unless they brought in a front end loader.)

corgski fucked around with this message at 06:44 on Jul 22, 2011

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



Good to see that Chevy's engineers still believe that the best crumble zone is the other car.

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



The problem was a combination of the fact that the Chevy was less crumply than most cars and that it was high enough that the entire truck just rode right over the Toyota's bumper, which is where most of the rear impact protection is. A trunk lid can only absorb so much force.

A Town & Country doesn't have quite the same ride height as a Silverado. If the friend had been driving one of those, the hypothetical kid in the backseat would probably have survived, because the bumpers would have actually been relevant.

corgski fucked around with this message at 04:32 on Jul 23, 2011

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



renraku posted:

The problem was the truck rear ended the car. Fin.

Look bro, we're not explaining poo poo to George Bush in here, we can go into detail about why that particular wreck loving devastated the Corolla where most other collisions at that speed would have been less damaging.

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



ratbert90 posted:

Sure, because going 33 in a 35 at a constant speed is super unpredictable.

Congrats for being one of the few who drive under the speed limit and isn't drunk/blind/geriatric/braking for hallucinations? Doesn't change the fact that driving under the prevailing speed of traffic makes things more dangerous for everyone else.

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



ratbert90 posted:

I would think that texting while driving/talking on the cell phone while driving/speeding/weaving in and out of traffic are all worse offences than going slightly slower than the limit.

Distracted driving is a serious hazard. Driving slower than the prevailing speed of traffic is also a serious hazard. Granted, it doesn't matter as much in urban settings, but it's still not something to brag about.

And please, we all know that the "limit" is a farce, and most cops won't ticket until you're doing 5-10+ over.

Regarding speeding:

http://www.motorists.org/speed-limits/faq posted:

Q. Isn't slower always safer?
A. No, federal and state studies have consistently shown that the drivers most likely to get into accidents in traffic are those traveling significantly below the average speed. According to research, those driving 10 mph slower than the prevailing speed are more likely to be involved in an accident. That means that if the average speed on an interstate is 70 mph, the person traveling at 60 mph is more likely to be involved in an accident than someone going 70 or even 80 mph.

corgski fucked around with this message at 04:22 on Aug 14, 2011

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



Actually, that quote was about you saying that speeding was more dangerous than driving under the prevailing speed, not about the degree of difference. Anyway, if people are really blowing your doors off every time you drive that stretch, you're going more than 2 under the prevailing speed.

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



ratbert90 posted:

No, people are really loving impatient. If the GPS says I am going 33 in a 35, I am going 33.

I believe you when you say you're going 33, but I bet money everyone else is going closer to 45 than 35. The limit is irrelevant, prevailing speed is what matters.

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



ratbert90 posted:

What is wrong with waving?
Besides the fact that it's passive-aggressive as gently caress? You gain nothing but the knowledge that you were just a prick to someone.

quote:

I am following the rules of the road, they aren't.
You're failing to recognize and follow the implicit rules, which, at best, makes you a sperg. Not every rule is written on paper.

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



ratbert90 posted:

So I should just speed up to avoid them tailgating me? I gain a lot by waving, I am showing them that they have gained NOTHING by tailgating and acting like a jackass.

No, you're gaining some sick self-satisfaction by being a prick. You show them absolutely nothing. I promise, you remember the incident for more than the 15 minutes it lasts in their head.

Don't wave, don't speed up if you don't feel like it, but understand that you are far more likely to be involved in an accident because of your misguided dedication to a legal limit that is barely enforced.

corgski fucked around with this message at 02:25 on Aug 15, 2011

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



B4Ctom1 posted:

Exploded 4L60

That picture is making me really unhappy about where the transmission in my jimmy sits relative to my shin.

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



It really isn't, and since the carpet's long gone and the floor pan is in iffy condition, I was already planning on making a drop in tray out of diamond plate to sit on top of the floor pan. I just didn't know 4L60s were so prone to grenading like that.

I shoulda bought a Cherokee.

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



oxbrain posted:

especially since you don't have any cap over the positive terminal.

Does frictape count?

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



Warped discs are a myth.

Bed your pads properly and the problem will be fixed.

E:

From 60mph, gently apply the brakes a couple of times to bring them up to operating temperature. This prevents you from thermally shocking the rotors and pads in the next steps.

Make eight to ten near-stops from 60mph to about 10-15 mph. Do it HARD by pressing the brakes firmly, but do not lock the wheels or engage ABS. At the end of each slowdown, immediately accelerate back to 60mph and then apply the brakes again. DO NOT COME TO A COMPLETE STOP! If you stop completely and sit with your foot on the brake pedal, you will imprint pad material onto the hot rotors, which could lead to vibration and uneven braking.

The brakes may begin to fade after the 7th or 8th near-stop. This fade will stabilize, but not completely go away until the brakes have fully cooled. A strong smell from the brakes, and even some smoke, is normal.

After the last near-stop, accelerate back up to speed and cruise for a while, using the brakes as little as possible. The brakes need only a few minutes to cool down. Try not to become trapped in traffic or come to a complete stop while the brakes are still very hot.

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



Nope. The stoptech article still deserves to be repeated twice though.

Vibration is caused by improperly bedded brakes.

corgski fucked around with this message at 06:18 on Sep 12, 2011

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



Any rural interstate.

Or any industrial road like henne said.

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



You mean hydrofluoric acid, the stuff that penetrates your skin without a mark and then eats your bones? Yes, you should probably wear gloves.

wikipedia posted:

Hydrogen fluoride gas is a severe poison that may immediately and permanently damage lungs and the corneas of the eyes. Water solutions (hydrofluoric acid) are a contact-poison with the potential for deep, initially painless burns, with later tissue death. By interfering with body calcium metabolism, the concentrated acid may also cause systemic toxicity and eventual cardiac arrest and fatality, after contact with as little as 160 cm2 (24.8 square inches) of skin.

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



When I hear dewar I think about the giant fuckoff 350lb bottles of liquid CO2 or whatever. The ones that are a bitch to move with a cart, and suicidal to move if you're asked to move it more than three feet or so without one.

E:

corgski fucked around with this message at 14:33 on Dec 10, 2011

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



Sponge! posted:

Any central PA goons with a garage want to let me rent it for an hour or two to swap it once the part hopefully arrives (it, too, could be the LAST ONE EVER.) All I have is a windy concrete parking lot... Unheated garage is perfectly fine, gently caress the wind.

I have an unheated garage in Middletown that you can use. You still have my number? Only problem is that it has a Suzuki Forenza (a.k.a. Daewoo Lacetti of star in a reasonably priced car fame) on jackstands in it until after new years.

And let me just say, that entire car is a horrible mechanical failure.

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



Give me a date and I'll probably trundle up from PA in one of my mechanical failures. I have family in that area, so it gives me an excuse to visit them too.

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



Dielectric posted:

Just bounce on the bumper and set off the alarm. Easy peasy. If no alarm, just a quick B&E and TCB.

Why break and enter? I've yet to find a car whose hood can't be unlatched with a screwdriver or a metal ruler.

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



Motronic posted:

Really? You haven't tried that on very many cars made in the last 15 years.

All of that is pretty trivially defeated with the right sheet metal around the latch, and that's something I've seen popping up, even as mid-model retrofits, on most modren cars.

Considering the newest car I regularly work on is a base-trim Suzuki Forenza from 2004, you're probably right.

It's saved my rear end several times when the hood release has decided to break or, in the case of my GMC Jimmy, when the cable slips out of its guides and goes loose.

corgski fucked around with this message at 03:15 on Apr 4, 2012

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



DJ Commie posted:

You're making a value judgement on what you think is robust, if a multinational engineering firm (BMW) decided that it was beneficial for emissions and any other reasons not disclosed, I'd tend to trust what they say.

Reasons: passes emissions. Cheaper than redesigning the engine. Despite being absurdly complex, it at least lasts the warranty period often enough that a risk assessment said it would be worth the warranty repairs on the failed units.

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



PA's is $36/yr.

Of course, the entirely separate inspection runs $70.

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



Sorry, you got financial carnage instead.

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



Sir Cornelius posted:

That's not a horrible mechanical failure. It's barely a 4 on the open Sockington scale.

So it only counts when there's more daylight than metal then?

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



Until you have a fire.

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



This is more of a pending horrible mechanical failure, but...

The PA inspection shop just failed my Jimmy because the front left upper control arm is tweaked slightly, (surprising that's the only front suspension component that's gone, since it's being rebuilt after a wreck that tweaked the entire front end,) all the control arm bushings are bad, and the rear brake cylinders are leaking slightly... which is good because the shoes are about gone too.

I have to drive 250 miles before I can put the new parts on. Wish me luck?

corgski fucked around with this message at 22:04 on May 15, 2012

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



I've driven in Florida, I just refuse to count it as a US state.

And yeah, PA inspections are draconian. People will buy cars at auction in PA and resell them in other states just because they're still almost guaranteed to pass inspection elsewhere when they fail the PA inspection.

corgski
Feb 6, 2007



ToG posted:

but I've been blinded a few times by people on the opposite side of the road with their front fogs on. Even if it's not blinding you, it's still distracting.


That should be a ticket for having improperly focused fog lights, like there technically is (although not enforced) for headlights. They should be focused low and wide, with the top cut low enough that they land below any other car's bumper.

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corgski
Feb 6, 2007



I don't know a single state that actually checks headlight focus in their inspections. If the lamp turns on, they'll slap a sticker on it.

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