Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us money per month for bills, and since we don't believe in showing ads to our users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
 
  • Post
  • Reply
Space Gopher
Jul 31, 2006
BLITHERING IDIOT

dvgrhl posted:

Mice aren't like a Killer NIC or anything like that, the $100 ones cost more because they are typically worth the extra cost.

Paying a premium for something that works well ergonomically is a good idea if you've got the money. I definitely agree that, as it's something you use almost constantly while you're at the computer, getting a good mouse is a very good idea.

However, dropping a hundred bucks on a mouse typically isn't a great idea unless you're buying some weird ergonomic design marketed as a medical device or something. The $100 mice typically use sensors and associated electronics that aren't that different from the $30 mice, and the shell is, no matter how ergonomic, still a piece of molded plastic that probably costs less than a dollar to make. The upshot is that there's probably a cheaper mouse out there that's just as good.

Even if you've got a particular $100 mouse that you're absolutely in love with, you can probably find it for a lot less if you wait for it to go on sale. The MX Revolution, for instance, has a $100 MSRP, but if you shop around you can find it for $60. The Razer Lachesis has an $80 MSRP, but costs $60 elsewhere. The Logitech G9 has a $100 MSRP, but you can find it for about half that. Basically, it's sometimes a good idea to buy a $100 mouse, but it's rarely a good idea to actually pay $100 for one.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Space Gopher
Jul 31, 2006
BLITHERING IDIOT

MrMoo posted:

Bluetooth has longer and more tedious coupling setup, non-bluetooth mice can be more convenient. For instance the latest Microsoft Arc Mice come with a tiny micro USB adapter and needs no software or effort above plugging it in to work on any platform.

On the other hand, once a Bluetooth mouse is paired up, you don't have to worry about plugging anything in to get it to work. On a desktop with 10 or 12 USB ports, that's not a huge concern. On a laptop with 3, one that's always taken up by a receiver is more of a problem. Plus, with all but the smallest receivers (and the Arc Mouse's doesn't qualify), you can't really leave it plugged in all the time.

Space Gopher
Jul 31, 2006
BLITHERING IDIOT

Sagebrush posted:

It's like they figured out the way that gets you good toggling and an annoying button (Anywhere MX), good button and annoying toggling (G9), and both together but really expensive (Revolution), and still haven't managed to hit the holy grail that puts all three together.

The M705 and M720 have pretty much exactly what you want: an easily reachable mode-switch button next to the scroll wheel, press-wheel-to-middle-click, and a reasonable price tag.

As long as you're in the market for a mobile-sized wireless nano-receiver or bluetooth mouse, anyway.

Space Gopher
Jul 31, 2006
BLITHERING IDIOT

Depends on what's broken.

A standard scroll wheel mechanism has the wheel sitting on a lever arm with a pivot at the front of the mouse, and a microswitch (just like any other mouse button) and some springs somewhere in the middle of the mouse body. Pushing down on the wheel makes the lever arm hit the microswitch. The mechanical disadvantage of the lever arm, combined with the springs, make it stiffer than a normal mouse button. Incidentally, the part that detects scrolling is separate. It uses an optical encoder in the wheel, which is the same basic slotted wheel/LED/photodiode mechanism that ball mice used to use to track roller motion.

If something in the mechanical pieces is broken - say, it feels jammed, or something's wrong with the springs - then replacing the scroll wheel assembly will probably fix it. If you open up the mouse, you should be able to see broken pieces and compare them to the replacements you get in a new scroll wheel assembly.

If you're seeing broken switch symptoms - say, it's triggering by itself - then you'll need to replace the switch.

Space Gopher
Jul 31, 2006
BLITHERING IDIOT

Solaris 2.0 posted:

Hi Thread,

So I am using a Logitech MX518 that I bought in 2006, and still going strong!


Recently I saw that Logitech re-released an "upgraded" MX518, and it is on sale at Best Buy for $20!

https://www.bestbuy.com/site/logite...p?skuId=6427398

However before I rush out to buy this, I thought to myself, maybe I should look at more modern options? I don't want to spend more than $50 on a mouse, because while I play lots of games, I don't play many multiplayer games much anymore.

Unfortunately after reading this thread, and looking at dozens of articles and youtube videos, there isn't a real consensus of what is the "best" sub <$100 gaming mouse.

Below are some of the options I was looking at (other than the already mentioned MX518).

Logitech G502 Hero

SteelSeries Rival 310

Razer Viper Ultralight

Corsair Harpoon

I can't read / watch reviews of these things anymore, because for every single mouse I look at, people either say "THIS IS A PIECE OF JUNK AVOID" or "BEST GAMING MOUSE EVER A+++ IT MADE ME AN ELITE GAMER" with little in between. So making a decision is getting a little frustrating.

There isn't a consensus on what's "best" because the biggest difference between all of them comes down to personal preference: how do you hold the mouse? what works best for your hand size and shape? Aside from that, they're more or less interchangeable. The sensors and hardware in all of them are more than adequate. None of them are especially unreliable, or bulletproof.

"Modern" options don't mean all that much, here. Mice have gotten lighter for the most part, but that was always an easy mod on most mice back when steel weights were standard. Wireless works well for gaming now, but you're looking at wired mice. RGB is, unfortunately, a thing. That's about it. Everything else is just about finding the right number of buttons and a shape that works for you.

If you've liked the MX518, you can get another one for cheap. If there were things you didn't like about it, then you can probably find a mouse that addresses those problems. It's up to you what you choose, and you can't pick the Single Best Option from spec sheets or uninformed people yelling into a camera about technology.

One final thing: don't be afraid to use different mice for different jobs. For instance, I use a dirt cheap Logitech G203 for playing videogames - it's tiny, light, and works well for a fingertip grip, the sensor is more than adequate, and I can set a permanent "gaudy lighting off" profile that's not dependent on their garbage software running in the background. Needs met. For work, though, I've also got an MX Vertical, which is a lot comfier when I'm in front of a computer for 4-5 hours at a time.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply