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Casu Marzu
Oct 20, 2008



Jewel Repetition posted:

It's unsettling, however, that this doesn't have any molasses or even any brown sugar

Sometimes you just need to step outside your comfort zone bruh.

I wouldn't want molasses or brown sugar in this light of a pie anyway.

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me your dad
Jul 25, 2006



I'm making these Asian style meatballs for a party:

https://www.gimmesomeoven.com/saucy-asian-meatballs/

I'm thinking instead of bread crumbs I might use some Jasmine rice. Would that work?

I've recently been using a recipe for porcupine meatballs, which is beef and (uncooked) rice, formed into meatballs, and then seared and simmered in tomato sauce while the rice cooks.

https://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes...pine-meatballs/

If I bake the meatballs as they have in the Asian recipe, will the rice cook as well if it were simmering on the stove?

Waci
May 30, 2011

Let me axe you just one question.

me your dad posted:


I'm thinking instead of bread crumbs I might use some Jasmine rice. Would that work?
It would lead to a different texture and appearance than using bread crumbs would, what with grains of rice being a fair bit larger than bread crumbs. I'd imagine rice would have a similar effect in helping the meatballs retain moisture as bread crumbs do (though maybe not quite to the same extent).

me your dad posted:

I've recently been using a recipe for porcupine meatballs, which is beef and (uncooked) rice, formed into meatballs, and then seared and simmered in tomato sauce while the rice cooks.

https://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes...pine-meatballs/

If I bake the meatballs as they have in the Asian recipe, will the rice cook as well if it were simmering on the stove?

You might want to at least partially cook the rice before mixing it into the meatballs if you want to bake them, since I wouldn't be confident counting on the meat releasing anywhere near enough liquid to compare to cooking them in a sauce.

Human Tornada
Mar 3, 2005

I been wantin to see a honkey dance.


Swapping breadcrumbs out for rice seems like it could have a huge effect on the end product and I wouldn't make them for the first time for a party.

me your dad
Jul 25, 2006



Yeah, it may be too risky. I might try them on my own though.

Weltlich
Feb 13, 2006

I won the 2018 Spooktober Story Contest and all I got was this lousy avatar.


Grimey Drawer

If you want to make a ground-meat-and-rice thing, try making Boudin Balls.

2lbs meat, cubed (whatever kind you want, pork, beef, lamb, turkey, alligator, rattlesnake)
1/2lb liver, cubed (if necessary) (pork, chicken, beef... I use chicken)
1/2 lb pork fat (optional if you are using a very lean meat like turkey breast)
1 onion, chopped
2 celery stalks, chopped
8 cloves minced garlic
2 tbs kosher salt
1 tbs black pepper
2 tsp white pepper
1 tbs paprika
1 tbs thyme
1 to 3 tsp of cayenne (to taste, depending on how hot you want it)
3 cups of water
2 cups of white wine (I use a pinot for this)
2 cups of cooked rice
Bread Crumbs

1) Mix the meats, vegetables, salt, and spices together. (Not the rice! That comes later) Put them in a ziploc bag or a tupperware, and leave it in the fridge overnight to marinate.
2) The next day, in a dutch oven, toss the mixture in to an oiled dutch oven over medium-high heat, and keep it moving until the meat browns a little and the onion goes transparent.
3) Add the water and wine, and bring it to a high simmer. Keep it simmering until the liquid decreases by not-quite half.
4) Kill the heat, let it cool for a couple of minutes, then strain off the liquid. RESERVE THE LIQUID DON'T DUMP IT OUT FOR GOD SAKE
5) Run the now-cooked mixture through a grinder, with a pretty coarse setting. You don't want to puree this. Alternately, you can put it in a food processor and pulse it until it's well blended, but not mealy.
6) Dump it into a mixing bowl, and add in the rice. Mix it up and start mixing in the liquid, a half cup at a time until it gets to the point where it sticks together well when you make a ball with it in your palm.
7) Use your hands to roll out ~1.5" wide balls out of the mix, and roll them in the breadcrumbs to make a coating.
8) Deep fry in peanut oil until they're golden brown. Put out on paper towels to dry.

Enjoy the flavor now, and the gout later.

Weltlich fucked around with this message at Nov 18, 2018 around 03:46

I. M. Gei
Jun 26, 2005





Who here knows anything about cornbread?

Serious Eats says this about cornmeal...

Serious Eats posted:

Notes

A lot of industrial cornmeal is made from underripe corn and then ground using modern methods for a very consistent grind. That kind of cornmeal does not make a good Southern-style unsweetened cornbread. For best results here, use a high-quality, fresh stone-ground cornmeal, such as from Anson Mills, Old Mill of Guilford, or Nora Mill; these cornmeals do not need additional sugar. If you use a more mass-market source, consider adding the optional sugar to help balance the flavor.
... buuut none of those three brands are available in my area. I want to make good cornbread for Thanksgiving stuffing, but I donít want to get reamed on rush shipping charges. Are there any other good brands out there, per Serious Eatsís recommendations? Maybe some that are available in Texas?

Annath
Jan 11, 2009



Clever Betty

My mom and Grandma have made cornbread with whatever brand of cornmeal is available, and uses a can or so of cream style corn along with it.

Doom Rooster
Sep 3, 2008


Pillbug

SeriousEats is getting way too spergy there. Use normal corn meal, and add a teaspoon of sugar per cup of corn meal used. I would literally bet $1,000 that even Sean Brock would be hard pressed to pick out the difference in a blind test.

I canít speak to ripeness at time of harvest, but Bobís Red Mill medium grind is available at Central Market (probably most normal grocery stores now) and its great.

I. M. Gei
Jun 26, 2005





Iím also thinking about just using this.



... with one of these recipes.

I have never tasted oyster-and-sausage stuffing before, so I have no idea if this would work though.

Extortionist
Aug 31, 2001

Leave the gun. Take the cannoli.

Use whatever cornmeal but make this recipe instead:

https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes...ead-recipe.html

wormil
Sep 12, 2002

Hulk will smoke you!

We did a tour at one of the NC stone mills and their cornmeal made the best cornbread I've ever tasted. Can't remember if it was Guilford or not, my wife might remember. But you can make good cornbread with most cornmeals. I prefer sweet cornbread with jalapeno and corn, mine is like a sweet and spicy corn cake.

That Works
Jul 21, 2006


Fun Shoe

I. M. Gei posted:

Who here knows anything about cornbread?

Serious Eats says this about cornmeal...

... buuut none of those three brands are available in my area. I want to make good cornbread for Thanksgiving stuffing, but I donít want to get reamed on rush shipping charges. Are there any other good brands out there, per Serious Eatsís recommendations? Maybe some that are available in Texas?


Get Jiffy mix. Seriously.

Casu Marzu
Oct 20, 2008



You can def tell the difference between commercial and heritage cornmeal, but if all you're gonna do with it is make stuffing, use whatever.

That Works
Jul 21, 2006


Fun Shoe

Casu Marzu posted:

You can def tell the difference between commercial and heritage cornmeal, but if all you're gonna do with it is make stuffing, use whatever.

Yep. Why i suggest the mix. Nearly every store carries it for cheap and it's hard to gently caress up.

Outrail
Jan 4, 2009

www.sapphicrobotica.com


I'm supposed to be cooking a frozen leg of venison tonight but due to work shifts I only got it out of the freezer yesterday and while it's softening up there's no way it'll be thawed in time.

The leg is from a young buck that we processed a few weeks ago so it shouldn't be too tough (hopefully)

Can I vac seal it with a seasoning/herbs and sous vide it for a really long time before searing it or is this going to gently caress it up? I was thinking if I increased the water temp that might help?

Or is it better to make it a bacon jacket and just roast it for 1.5 times regular time?

Weltlich
Feb 13, 2006

I won the 2018 Spooktober Story Contest and all I got was this lousy avatar.


Grimey Drawer

I. M. Gei posted:

Iím also thinking about just using this.



... with one of these recipes.

I have never tasted oyster-and-sausage stuffing before, so I have no idea if this would work though.

Oyster and Sausage Stuffing is amazing, btw. I tend to prefer it with duck, but with turkey it's still outstanding.

Casu Marzu
Oct 20, 2008



Outrail posted:

I'm supposed to be cooking a frozen leg of venison tonight but due to work shifts I only got it out of the freezer yesterday and while it's softening up there's no way it'll be thawed in time.

The leg is from a young buck that we processed a few weeks ago so it shouldn't be too tough (hopefully)

Can I vac seal it with a seasoning/herbs and sous vide it for a really long time before searing it or is this going to gently caress it up? I was thinking if I increased the water temp that might help?

Or is it better to make it a bacon jacket and just roast it for 1.5 times regular time?

Depends on how thick it is, but yes you can SV meat from frozen just fine.

MAKE NO BABBYS
Jan 28, 2010


What would you all suggest as a sub for the type of sausage in that recipe? I eat all meats and there are types of sausage I like, but Italian sausage is not one of them. Iím having a hard time thinking of a tasty sub.

C-Euro
Mar 20, 2010



Soiled Meat

Slow-cooked a pork shoulder this weekend and I have some leftover skin. What should I do with it? Was thinking of just crisping it up in a pan for a snack.

That Works
Jul 21, 2006


Fun Shoe

MAKE NO BABBYS posted:

What would you all suggest as a sub for the type of sausage in that recipe? I eat all meats and there are types of sausage I like, but Italian sausage is not one of them. I’m having a hard time thinking of a tasty sub.

Breakfast sausage?

BrianBoitano
Nov 15, 2006

This is fine.


How do people not go insane quartering cherry tomatoes?



I'm not 100% against SLAP CHOP

moller
Jan 10, 2007

Swan stole my music and framed me!


BrianBoitano posted:

How do people not go insane quartering cherry tomatoes?



I'm not 100% against SLAP CHOP

A paring knife and a podcast?

Hauki
May 11, 2010



BrianBoitano posted:

How do people not go insane quartering cherry tomatoes?



I'm not 100% against SLAP CHOP

use a sharp knife?

Outrail
Jan 4, 2009

www.sapphicrobotica.com


Casu Marzu posted:

Depends on how thick it is, but yes you can SV meat from frozen just fine.

Just following up on this. I didn't have time to SV, but for some reason it thawed out oddly fast, being fully thawed by early afternoon in an ice bath.

Cooked it pretty fast in the oven with another two hours at low temp. Slightly dry, but it was pretty lean. Next time I'll prep for a 12-24 hr slow cook in the water bath.

poeticoddity
Jan 14, 2007
"How nice - to feel nothing and still get full credit for being alive." - Kurt Vonnegut Jr. - Slaughterhouse Five

Outrail posted:

Just following up on this. I didn't have time to SV, but for some reason it thawed out oddly fast, being fully thawed by early afternoon in an ice bath.

Cooked it pretty fast in the oven with another two hours at low temp. Slightly dry, but it was pretty lean. Next time I'll prep for a 12-24 hr slow cook in the water bath.

A pretty solid rule of thumb I've learned for sous vide with frozen foods is to multiply cook time by 1.5 to account for the time required to get the center up to temperature, which is nice because it's usually well within the maximum suggested cook time.
For fillets, burgers, and other reasonably thin preparations, you can typically just add 15-30 minutes

For most common meats, someone's made a time*temperature chart which accounts for whatever's the temperature-heartiest common pathogen for that meat.
I recently cooked 4 frozen 3lb turkey breasts with no problems.

You can also use an immersion circulator set to <40F to speed up the thawing of frozen meat if you plan on cooking it some other way.

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Outrail
Jan 4, 2009

www.sapphicrobotica.com


poeticoddity posted:

You can also use an immersion circulator set to <40F to speed up the thawing of frozen meat if you plan on cooking it some other way.

.....

gently caress! Why didn't I think of that? Goddam it's so obvious.

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