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Anonymous Robot
Jun 1, 2007

Lost his leg in Robo War I


I love a good aviation, but thatís a drink Iíll order from a bar with a strong cocktail program. Iím not going to bother buying creme de violette or fiddle with the spec just for that, though.

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Data Graham
Dec 28, 2009





BrianBoitano posted:

If you want to play round, citric acid + malic acid + sugar + citrus bitters are all needed to get closer to the real thing, but there's nothing saying omitting one will make a bad drink.

When you say "real thing" ... you're referring to what? I thought the Aviation and Last Word were both pretty simple mixes without any of what you list.

e: oh, you mean simulate real citrus juice without actually squeezing one.

Sir Lemming
Jan 27, 2009

It's a piece of JUNK!

Anonymous Robot posted:

If you’d like to ease back on the lime’s perceived acidity, you could try keeping the quantity the same, but juicing your limes about six hours ahead of time.

Oh right, I've heard of that before I think. I should definitely give it a shot. Do I need to cover and refrigerate it, or just cover, or neither?

Anonymous Robot posted:

I love a good aviation, but that’s a drink I’ll order from a bar with a strong cocktail program. I’m not going to bother buying creme de violette or fiddle with the spec just for that, though.

I was going to buy creme de violette but they didn't have any 😞

Anonymous Robot
Jun 1, 2007

Lost his leg in Robo War I


Sir Lemming posted:

Oh right, I've heard of that before I think. I should definitely give it a shot. Do I need to cover and refrigerate it, or just cover, or neither?

Cover and refrigerate. Refrigeration may not strictly be necessary but it couldnít hurt.

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux




Creme de violette owns, I just bought a bottle for the first time in like 7 years and now all of my drinks taste like grandmas.

Carillon
May 9, 2014





Yeah violette is great, not only is the color awesome, but I do love that floral flavor in small amounts.

Rectovagitron
Mar 13, 2007




Grimey Drawer

For The Last Word, Aviations, Negronis, other classic cocktails, ​I always use 1.5 of the base spirits. A bartender friend once told me that classic cocktails were designed when the base spirit was a lot more harsh than modern gins, whiskeys, whatever, and that you should up the booze to keep a more modest balance. I don't know if I buy the reasoning, but it's helped me balance a lot of these cocktails better.

After living in Chicago, Cali, and NYC, I can say that the quality of your lime makes a huge difference. Old limes are gonna be way more pronounced in liminess, vs a nice citrus edge, in my experience. Not having access to California citrus anymore is a huge bummer.

My other preference is to always go easy on maraschino. It's so sweet. I prefer this Kosher one called Maraska Maraschino, that is a bit more mild and way cheaper.

Fart Car '97
Jul 23, 2003

o fuk traffic

Rectovagitron posted:

bartender friend once told me that classic cocktails were designed when the base spirit was a lot more harsh than modern gins, whiskeys, whatever, and that you should up the booze to keep a more modest balance.

Yeah that's a buncha crap

Data Graham
Dec 28, 2009





I made blood orange negronis for some guests who were over this past weekend (using Whitley Neill blood orange gin and some orange bitters) and it went over real nice.

Human Tornada
Mar 3, 2005

I been wantin to see a honkey dance.


lavaca posted:

Perhaps I trusted Martin Cate a bit too much because I bought a bottle of Rhum JM White only to realize that the Smugglers Cove book has maybe 3 drinks that use it. Aside from Ti' Punch and "use it in place of your Plantation 3 Stars and see what happens", what are some things I can do with a liter of 110-proof rhum agricole?

There's a handful more with less common ingredients, but here's a few of the simpler ones from Minimalist Tiki.

Tongan Rhum Swizzle, Marie King
3 dash angostura
.75 oz lime
1 oz white grapefruit juice
.5 oz cinnamon syrup
.25 oz pimento dram
1.5 oz unaged agricole Rhum

Stir in a tall glass with crushed ice and float more angostura.

Caribbean Goddess, Oriol Elias
2 slices fresh ginger
1 dash angostura
1 oz lime
1 oz cream of coconut
2 oz coconut water
1 tsp pimento dram
2 oz unaged agricole rhum
freshly grated nutmeg for garnish

Muddle ginger in shaker, then add the rest and shake w/ ice.

Apricot Swizzle, Matt Pietrek
.5 oz lemon
.5 oz orgeat
.5 oz apricot liqueur
2 oz unaged agricole rhum (50% abv and up)
6-10 dashes angostura, to float

Stir in tall glass with crushed ice.

Four Suns, Matt Pietrek
1 dash angostura
.75 oz lemon
1 oz white grapefruit
1 oz cinnamon (or nutmeg) syrup
1 oz unaged agricole rhum
1 oz light rum

Shake w/ ice and strain over fresh ice.

Tropic of Cancer, Chad Austin
pinch salt
.5 oz passion fruit liqueur
1 oz campari
1.5 oz unaged agricole Rhum

Build ingredients in a mixing glass, add cubed ice, stir until diluted and chilled. Strain over large block ice in a rocks glass. Garnish with a thin (dehydrated if possible) lime wheel.

lavaca
Jun 11, 2010


Thanks! This looks like a pretty good starting point.

I did end up making a ti' punch last night and was quite happy with the results. Like an old fashioned, it's just enough sugar (and lime) to make the drink go down more easily but not enough to overwhelm the flavor of the spirit. 110-proof rhum feels a lot stronger than 100-proof rye, though.

Will try slipping some in a mai tai later and report back. Previously I had mediocre results putting Barbancourt 3-star into a mai tai but I think that's just because I don't like Barbancourt very much. Adding a bit of OFTD to a mai tai, on the other hand, is definitely recommended.

The Bandit
Aug 18, 2006

Westbound And Down

I like the JM with smith and cross for a Mai tai, give it a go

Rectovagitron
Mar 13, 2007




Grimey Drawer

Fart Car '97 posted:

Yeah that's a buncha crap

Well I like it.

Sandwich Anarchist
Sep 12, 2008









Kenning posted:

Creme de violette owns, I just bought a bottle for the first time in like 7 years and now all of my drinks taste like grandmas.

Grandmartini

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux





eSports Chaebol
Feb 22, 2005


Data Graham posted:

When you say "real thing" ... you're referring to what? I thought the Aviation and Last Word were both pretty simple mixes without any of what you list.

e: oh, you mean simulate real citrus juice without actually squeezing one.

I've tried this before (citric + malic + phosphoric + tartaric) but I've never bothered with succinc, since it's a little harder to find and fake lime calls for so little

lo and behold i saw this on the shelf at a liquor store



(i aint payin for this though!)

I also agree that pretty much every cocktail recipe that has a significant amount of citrus is a bit more tart than I care for, but I figure it's just a preference

eSports Chaebol fucked around with this message at 07:10 on Mar 12, 2021

Escape Addict
Jan 25, 2012

YOSPOS


I just wanted to pop in to recommend my favorite affordable tequila: Olmeca Altos Plata.



It's made in the traditional way (stone/brick oven & roller mill--not diffuser) and is delicious. The aroma is pure perfume and the flavor is a nice bittersweet roasted agave, like coffee with honey.

Here's the Tequila Matchmaker profile page if you're interested:
https://www.tequilamatchmaker.com/tequilas/2402-olmeca-altos-plata

I've tried the Reposado version, and I like the Plata better. The Reposado tasted to me a little too woody; it really sucked up the barrel flavor.

This tequila has the best price for quality ratio I have ever encountered. It's a $20-25 bottle with $30-40 taste. Much better than anything else at the same price point. Hope you find this info useful! I love the stuff.

Professor Wayne
Aug 27, 2008

So, Harvey, what became of the giant penny?

They actually let him keep it.

I got a new phone and, it wiped out my Mixel bar and saved recipes. Do I just need to bite the bullet and add them all again? At least it remembered I've paid for it.

Sandwich Anarchist
Sep 12, 2008









Professor Wayne posted:

I got a new phone and, it wiped out my Mixel bar and saved recipes. Do I just need to bite the bullet and add them all again? At least it remembered I've paid for it.

You need to log into your account through the app. It should all be there on their server.

angerbeet
Mar 23, 2004


Come into the lob-ratory! The dog lobster laboratory!


Saw this online and thought of this thread, hope it's not a repost.

1974 U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service Cocktail Construction

Professor Wayne
Aug 27, 2008

So, Harvey, what became of the giant penny?

They actually let him keep it.

Sandwich Anarchist posted:

You need to log into your account through the app. It should all be there on their server.

Thanks! I had to get out my old phone and actually make an account.

Carillon
May 9, 2014





angerbeet posted:

Saw this online and thought of this thread, hope it's not a repost.

1974 U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service Cocktail Construction



Very cool! Lotta water in that julep. I bet it's easier to cross-refer in paper with the legend too.

Carillon
May 9, 2014





Loving that double post life, but I got some compass box glasgow blend and drambuie for some recipes from the Aviary book. Decided to make a rusty nail with that and wow it's really good. 2oz scotch, maybe 1/3 oz drambuie with a lemon twist. Would recommend, definitely not as overly sweet or stodgy as I was worried about given the cocktail's reputation.

prayer group
May 31, 2011

$#$%^&@@*!!!


It would be sweet and stodgy if you made it as an equal-parts cocktail as it was normally done. Changing the build so that itís more like an Old Fashioned where the Drambuie is providing both the sweetener and bitters aspects, as you have done, definitely makes a nicer drink.

Carillon
May 9, 2014





Oh no way. I admit I wasn't all that familiar I guess with the more 'classic' build then. I could see that changing the complexion of the drink.

Data Graham
Dec 28, 2009





Lmao I love when I go googling for a couple of ingredients to see if they go together and all I find are stunt recipes adjacent to TV shows.

Like, amaretto and gin? *clackety clackety* Oh look it's Mad Men Season 3 nerds making poo poo up, and never heard from again

BrianBoitano
Nov 15, 2006

this is fine





Don't worry, this guy will somehow make the amaretto and gin work:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FY4ZC_yYE-4

BrianBoitano
Nov 15, 2006

this is fine





Always glad to have an open bottle of prosecco. Opens up a lot of drinks I don't do on most weeks!

Tonight was toying with sbagliato ratios! See my note at the bottom.

my kinda ape
Sep 15, 2008

Everything's gonna be A-OK


Oven Wrangler

I made a Hinky Dinks Fizzy and it's pretty good. Rothman & Winter apricot liqueur tastes amazing.

chitoryu12
Apr 23, 2014



Carillon posted:

Loving that double post life, but I got some compass box glasgow blend and drambuie for some recipes from the Aviary book. Decided to make a rusty nail with that and wow it's really good. 2oz scotch, maybe 1/3 oz drambuie with a lemon twist. Would recommend, definitely not as overly sweet or stodgy as I was worried about given the cocktail's reputation.

Try experimenting with a Smoky Nail. You use a heavily smoked scotch.

DoctaFun
Dec 12, 2005

Dammit Francis!


Hello friends, I just started getting into making cocktails and Iím looking to get some advice on where to go next!

I love whisky, mainly bourbon and scotch(trend towards sherried stuff), so a lot of my cocktails have been classic whiskey based stuff, but Iíve been branching out.

I have a pretty much endless supply of whisky, so besides restocking WT 101, or rittenhouse rye on occasion, Iím good there.

Over the last few months Iíve added:
Bombay sapphire
Titoís vodka
Smith and cross Jamaican rum
Pyrat rum
Allspice dram
Campari
St Germaine
Cointreau

Iíve made simple syrup, raspberry syrup, honey syrup, have plenty of citrus, and Ango/Peychaud/homemade cherry vanilla bitters.

So far, Iíve really liked the following cocktails in no particular order:
Old fashioned, boulevardier, gold rush, painkiller, jungle bird, amaretto sour, clover club, variety of gin fizzes

I liked quite a bit:
Lions tail, Boston sour, Manhattan, clarified pina colada(came out kind of sour, so I have to doctor it up a bit before serving)

And kind of didnít care for:
Negroni(was too bitter for me at the 1:1:1 ratio).

I have a bit of a sweet tooth, so the tiki drinks have really been hitting the spot, but any suggestions on rounding out my home bar? I have a collection problem, so itís easy for me to want to go buy like 5 bottles of crap a week to make like one cocktail that looked cool.

Had my eye on the following stuff to add over time:

Ogreat
Velvet falernum
Chartreuse
Round out my rum supply a bit
Empress gin(likely would DIY this)
Some other gin varieties
Mezcal(never tried mezcal)
Tequila(never tried anything other than really bad tequila)

Any words of wisdom or advice?

zmcnulty
Jul 26, 2003



I'd throw in Drambuie. Apparently you also have amaretto too, so try a Godfather. Both dead simple whisky cocktails and you can adjust the sweetness up or down depending on your preferences. edit: whoops, Rusty Nail is already mentioned on this very page

zmcnulty fucked around with this message at 04:03 on Mar 17, 2021

Carillon
May 9, 2014





Well you're off to a great start! Tiki wise I love having velvet falernum so definitely a good add. Two of the most common tiki drinks I make are a bitter mai tai and a Lelani Volcano 2.0. Quoting myself below, my partner has a sweet tooth and loves guava, so if that sounds like you I think you would love it! The og calls for guava soda instead of seltzer+nectar, so either way would work. As for the bitter mai tai it definitely has a campari edge, but I don't think is near as bitter as a negroni, what with the sweetness it adds.

Carillon posted:

Bitter mai tai would love some crushed ice in the finished glass! Otherwise I've been making a lot of Lelani Volcano 2.0's for my partner who loves guava. Adapted from the smuggler's cove book:

2 oz guava nectar
1oz cream of coconut
1.5 oz pineapple juice
.75 oz lime juice
2 oz rum

add ~1 oz seltzer to a collins or tiki glass with crushed ice

shake it up and pour over the ice/seltzer.

It's really good!

But otherwise I think you'd be surprised too that you can get some interesting concoctions adding whisky to some tiki drinks either partially or fully replacing the rum (depending). A lot of tiki drinks have interesting flavor from the combined flavors of the different rums, so while you'll get a different effect it's not always gonna be bad.

DoctaFun
Dec 12, 2005

Dammit Francis!


zmcnulty posted:

I'd throw in Drambuie. Apparently you also have amaretto too, so try a Godfather. Both dead simple whisky cocktails and you can adjust the sweetness up or down depending on your preferences. edit: whoops, Rusty Nail is already mentioned on this very page

I totally forgot to mention the amaretto, but glad to have other ideas on how to use it! Iíll add drambuie to the list as well.


Carillon posted:

Well you're off to a great start! Tiki wise I love having velvet falernum so definitely a good add. Two of the most common tiki drinks I make are a bitter mai tai and a Lelani Volcano 2.0. Quoting myself below, my partner has a sweet tooth and loves guava, so if that sounds like you I think you would love it! The og calls for guava soda instead of seltzer+nectar, so either way would work. As for the bitter mai tai it definitely has a campari edge, but I don't think is near as bitter as a negroni, what with the sweetness it adds.


But otherwise I think you'd be surprised too that you can get some interesting concoctions adding whisky to some tiki drinks either partially or fully replacing the rum (depending). A lot of tiki drinks have interesting flavor from the combined flavors of the different rums, so while you'll get a different effect it's not always gonna be bad.

Those look awesome! Iíll add them to the list of Ďto makeí drinks. I love the idea of subbing whiskey for rum, will definitely keep that in mind too.

I caught myself drinking way too much over quarantine, so Iíve been trying to do no more than one drink a night. Iíll check back in after making some of these.

One other question, is there any cordials that do or donít make sense to buy fancy / more expensive versions of? I bought cheap amaretto, but then bought Cointreau after seeing so many recipes specify that specifically instead of triple sec. Iím constantly second guessing myself about that stuff...

Carillon
May 9, 2014





DoctaFun posted:

I totally forgot to mention the amaretto, but glad to have other ideas on how to use it! I’ll add drambuie to the list as well.


Those look awesome! I’ll add them to the list of ‘to make’ drinks. I love the idea of subbing whiskey for rum, will definitely keep that in mind too.

I caught myself drinking way too much over quarantine, so I’ve been trying to do no more than one drink a night. I’ll check back in after making some of these.

One other question, is there any cordials that do or don’t make sense to buy fancy / more expensive versions of? I bought cheap amaretto, but then bought Cointreau after seeing so many recipes specify that specifically instead of triple sec. I’m constantly second guessing myself about that stuff...

That's tough and a good question! I think everyone has a different level that they find important for themselves. I've recently found Mr. Black for instance and have a hard time thinking I'll go back to Kahlua, but as good as the Tempus Fugit menthe and cream de cacao are, I doubt I'll feel bad going back to cheaper stuff for more bog standard cocktails. They are very good, but I'm not often drinking straight and find that it's less important to me.

One thing there are a few different orange liquers out there, so if you're interested you can have some fun trying out the different bottles and price points. There's not hard and fast rules here, but generally I'd say you find curacao's which maybe tend to be made with a more spirit forward base liquer, where as triple secs tend to be clear with more neutral spirit flavor. Again, not a protected category, but if I had to make basic distinctions that's where I'd start. My favorite is the Pierre Ferrand Curacao, it's my go to. You really can't go wrong with Cointreau, Grand Marnier, Pierre Ferrand (I can't speak to Gran Gala or the others).

tsc
Jun 18, 2004
hostis humani generis

Help! I had this drink at a restaurant and I'd really like to recreate it at home. Any ideas for ratios?

The Maestro
Feb 21, 2006


Usually the first ingredient will be the majority, but that one might list Fernet first because itís what the predominant flavor will be.

Iíd try
1oz Fernet
.5 aperol / st g / gin
.75 lime

There might be .5oz simple syrup to balance too. Was it served up?

The Bandit
Aug 18, 2006

Westbound And Down

My thought is itís a last word riff. 3/4 across the board, 1/4 st germain.


But what maestro said generally holds true

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux




Finally back on the novel punch game. Had a camp out this weekend at my mom's house with a couple friends, which was a great excuse to trial a punch. It turned out very well!



This is Bully Dawson's Punch, and its particular characteristic is combining rum, cognac, and arrack, and also adding some porter. I used Speedway Stout, which is a 12% imperial stout by Alesmith. Wondrich's recipe is on the small side, so I scaled it up by 2.5 to use a whole bottle of rum, and also serve a whole party.

Bully Dawson's Punch

1 750 bottle Jamaica rum
12.5 oz. cognac
2.5 oz. Batavia arrack
8 oz. porter
10 oz. turbinado sugar
7.5 oz. lemon juice, plus peels
50 oz. water
nutmeg

Make an oleo-saccharum with the lemon peels and sugar, or use the squeezing method as I did. Combine with a cup or two of boiling water to melt the sugar, fish out the peels, then add the lemon juice, spirits, and porter. If you want to serve hot, add the remainder of the water boiling as well. Otherwise do as I did and add the rest of the water cold and serve on an ice block. Finish with nutmeg. I trialed a small version of this punch hot before the party, and it was quite good as a warming drink, and I was prepared to deploy it that way in case of severe chill, but a traditional cold punch worked well for this event.

This was a highly traditional punch flavor before the stout, and would have been good that way, but the addition of the dark, malty beer made it rich and brothy, and mellowed out the lemon quite a lot. I'll probably knock this one together again sometime, since it's basically a slightly fancier version of a standard rum punch.

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PRADA SLUT
Mar 14, 2006

Got a big STEM up my asshole.


What interesting variations can I make on a caipirinha? Maybe sub sugar for Cointreau and make it more like a margarita? Bitters?

I got some Novo Fogo and itís fantastic

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