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Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

poo poo. I've been trying to find work for 4 months (background of network engineering, IT support) and I went out and got my Security+ just to make sure I wasn't getting dropped in favor of candidates with certs.

Only had it for one day so not sure if it's working or not.

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Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

Peachfart posted:

I honestly didn't know Sec+ was worth anything. I got mine for work a year ago and it wasn't that hard.

I think A+ can be renewed with Network+ and that can be renewed with a Security+. So it's three times as good as an A+ and twice as good as a Network+.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

rafikki posted:

It was an unfunny joke, yes, but you have no idea the quantity of bugs (actual bugs, documented by Cisco, not failures of configuration) we run into on a weekly basis.

There's that old saying that no one ever got fired for buying Cisco.

Then again I only know switches. Back in the early days of DSL the ISP I worked for had Ciscos access servers that were horrible pieces of poo poo.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

Judge Schnoopy posted:

The best thing about S+ is if you've worked in IT for a year or two, you shouldn't have to study for more than a day to pass it.

Going to go with a hard disagree on that one. I spent a couple of months farting around with books and 3 weeks of pretty regular studying and passed by a much closer margin than I'd like.

It's a lot of data and CompTIA tests are written by people for who English is at best a 3rd language. You'll miss things you'd have otherwise gotten right, so you need some cushion.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

MrBigglesworth posted:

I think I got laid off at the perfectly wrong time. 3.5 years of Networking experience is just not opening any doors. 2 CCNAs, R&S and Data Center, is not opening any doors. 4 year goddamn BS in Comp Sci, is not opening any doors. Unemployed a month now, thousands of recruiters submitting my info and only 1 real interview, no feedback yet. Every single one of them, as stated "we are impressed with your core knowledge, but how but this other stuff you dont know about?"

Had a prelim Amazon interview, but she said I dont have enough for their network engineering team so she is trying me for "network technician" and I have no clue on the salary range from her. Only 1 Glassdoor submission for $64k, which is barely what I make now and would require a relocate. Pending a tech interview, if I pass that they fly me out to Oregon for an in person interview.

I dont know how to proceed/what to do. Ive basically been pure Network Engineer for a few years, no cross functionality was available at the previous employer, they had their own server, storage, vm guys, network guys, etc.

I have no programming/scripting (python, etc, wouldn't even know where to start)

Had been studying CCNP SWITCH but that got jacked with the job elimination and subsequent search.

I was in the same boat. Networking and load balancer experience, which isn't needed unless it's a really big company with dedicated networking engineering teams. Most places I found wanted LDAP experience too, but that's not something I'd ever touch in my technical fork. It took me about 4 months to find work. I finally got a NOC job which is pretty nice, but I haven't worked in a NOC since 2005 and I had to lie and tell my interviewer how much I missed shift work.

I need to probably learn code since that's apparently what everyone wants. I interviewed for a Security Engineer position and was told straight up they didn't want firewall people and instead needed python coders to automate firewall alerts. WTF? It's a weird market. I picked up some Kindle books and Udemy courses and will hopefully get a beginner's baseline that I can expand on from there.

Krispy Wafer fucked around with this message at 15:22 on Aug 22, 2017

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

A+ is good in that it shows you're capable of sitting down and studying a deliberately obtuse test and are willing to learn. It also arbitrarily culls the number of resumes HR has to consider. There's no downside to it and potentially decent upsides, regardless of what some people may say who probably hire crap applicants with test dumps CCNA's for entry level jobs.

I never got my A+, but I read a study guide, which filled in some gaps I had in computer hardware knowledge. It's not a bad way to spend $300. At the very least, passing that will boost your confidence studying for other more difficult certifications.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

MrBigglesworth posted:

Is SY0-401 still the hotness for Sec+? I thought I read somewhere that the new test was coming up soon, at https://certification.comptia.org/certifications/security#tab2 so the current one is still obtainable. Mine expired in April and just today I got calls from 3 recruiters that want me to get into a possible security role but lacking on an updated Sec+ is a ding right now.

Wondering if I should try to knock that one out, now that Ive been in the deeper aspects the job for the last few years, it shouldn't be as much of a climb as it was the first time.

The test is changing soon. I want to say October, but your Google is as good as mine.

So yeah, get to or wait until new study guides come out.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

Just putting this out there, no system admin Iíve ever dealt with knew networking. Their knowledge stopped at the outbound interface. Doesnít matter what job it was, if a system admin is on the conference call, theyíre saying, ďmaybe itís a networking problemĒ it isnít, itís an application issue or possibly the firewall, did you reboot your server, oh you didnít make those routes permanent did you, Iíll never get this hour of my life back will I

So definitely focus on system admin if thatís your jam, but it canít hurt to know a baseline for IP networking.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

skooma512 posted:

Wait, an actual shotgun? How did your boss react when you told him that?

It was an IT guy. The shotgun probably shot marshmallows.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

I had no idea Powershell was this important. I haven't used Windows at work in forever and always considered PS a crappy terminal emulator.

Space Racist posted:

For someone just starting their first job, what advice would you give? Are there any painful lessons you learned in your first job that you wish you knew going in?

Take some Udemy courses and read a Dummies book or two on broad general concepts. It's very easy to get tied up in your particular organization's very specific technology implementation. To the extent that you're smart in one subject and dumb in another related aspect that is going to get you killed in future job interviews. Certs, obviously fix this issue really well. But certs take a lot of time whereas reading a book or two each year isn't going to make you sweat.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

I've been buying books and studying for my drat CCNA for a decade.

I was up for a job at Cisco (non-technical) and was so excited to throw all my certificate training books in the trash. Alas I'm still in a NOC. At some point I'll get my act together and at least get the ICND1. The best suggestion I've found is to schedule your test and then worry about studying because that at least cures the procrastination.

Does Cisco offer a test tier with a free exam retake like CompTIA? I feel like the only reason I passed my Sec+ was because I knew I had a second shot and could relax.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

Peachfart posted:

No, as far as I know there are no retakes. In fact, after you fail you can't retake the test for a week.
And if you have been working with Cisco equipment for years, you should be able to pass the ICND1 without much difficulty. It is basically: can you subnet? Do you know basic router/switch setup? Know your ports? Know your layers? If so, you can pass.

90% of it is being paranoid I'm going to fail and putting it off. Also, I'm really bad at subnetting. Like I'll study and know my CIDR tables like a pro and almost be able to do it in my head and then I don't use it (because my job doesn't actually require me to subnet) and all that knowledge is flushed out of my brain in favor of Trump tweets or some poo poo. So I have to schedule a test to coincide with that brief period of time I actually remember something.

But I'm a pro at my ports. TFTP!

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

Dr. Arbitrary posted:

What's the over/under that these are just things that people have pranked CompTIA HQ with?

I know if I'm ever in the area I'm going to add suspicious warchalk marks.

I prefer wardryerase on white boards.

CompTIA is just making poo poo up at this point.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

Kashuno posted:

"Choose the BEST sex toy for information security"

Mantrap. The answer is always mantrap.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

CompTIA tells your prospective employer you have a baseline/general knowledge or you know where the test dumps are.

Don't underestimate them though. They make up for their newbie reputation by being deliberately obtuse in content and questions. You have to put in the time preparing for them. I probably spent 6 months in casual prep and 1 month hardcore and barely passed my Sec+.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

Mantrap gets a lot of attention both on the Sec+ and in BSDM forums.

CompTIA recommends you not write your safe word on a sticky note under your keyboard.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

OSU_Matthew posted:

I took the beta cloud+ exam earlier this week, and holy gently caress that was godawful. The official preparation book is utterly worthless and had absolutely nothing to do with the obtuse content on the exam, and every question was a dense or nonsensical troubleshooting prompt. The study material was light to the point of being utterly useless, and was of almost negative value on the exam.

I didn't figure it'd be a worthwhile cert anyways, but I figured hey fifty bucks would get me off my rear end and studying for new certs again. But after that experience, I really wish I hadn't wasted my time with it. I learned nothing of value from the official cert study guide, and the test had nothing to do with the study materials and the questions were stupidly obtuse.

Worst part is, I won't find out how I did for another few months

Did you get the question on warclouding?

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

Dr. Arbitrary posted:

Also memorize the top 10-15 or so most common ports, and learn all their names for Phishing. I felt like it was mostly common sense.

Spearing, whaling, war spearing, war whaling, vishing, mo'ishing, and mantraps.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

skooma512 posted:

Itís the easiest cert you can get really. Read the book, memorise the bullshit, regurgitate, forget.

The test is terrible though. There are enough ambiguous answers that you really need to know everything to make it past the gotcha questions. But yes, itís all memorization.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

Finally investing in a home lab to try and knock out my ICND 1 and 2. My home office is about to get really noisy and probably kind of warm.

I had to interview yesterday for my own job (trying to convert from contractor to FTE) and my manager was talking about a prior candidate who stated she had a CCNA but didn't know what firewalls were. I'm really curious now if she just lied about the cert or if she did test dumps.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

DotyManX posted:

Having just finished those tests, she must have lied. Even if you memorized answers from a test dump I think you would pick up what a firewall is along the way.

Maybe, I just can't imagine just sticking certifications in your resume without knowing what they were.

I mean, I once put down that I knew VMware because I had a desktop copy but at least that had like...2% truth to it.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

Jbz posted:

Anyone have an idea on how much easier studying for the CCNA and CCNA Security will be with a lab in my apartment? I've gotten mixed responses from already certified folks. I'd obviously prefer not to spend a bunch of money on equipment, but if it would make things a significant amount easier, I guess I'd be dumb not to.

I have no Cisco experience but all the comptia poo poo, for whatever that counts for.

I've tried Packet Tracer and I just can't get into it so I'm picking up an used CCNA lab in a desktop rack tomorrow. I'd check Craigslist and see what's out there. I'm getting mine for $150. I had priced out the parts on eBay for around $200. That's 3 routers and 3 switches in a desktop rack.

There's a definite advantage to seeing the stuff and working with it. The last thing you need is getting a job and then staring blankly at the hardware the first time you're asked to work on it because you've never actually touched a Cisco switch or router.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

Crusty Juggler posted:

Hey folks! First off, I wanna say thanks to everyone that posts in this thread! I check in regularly when there are new posts, and a lot of the info I've got has been super helpful.

Secondly, I was wanting to see if anyone could advise me in my current situation. I'm almost 30, and while I've pretty much been using a PC in my personal life since I was pretty young, I made the boneheaded decision to get a Bachelors in History. To the shock and surprise of no one, this didn't really help me in getting a job, but I lucked out in securing some pretty steady customer service heavy jobs - right now, I'm just shy of three years doing administrative work for Deloitte in the DC area. However, I've been thinking that now might be the time to switch career paths to something more IT heavy, since that's definitely not an industry that's going away any time soon, and there's a lot more opportunity there than my current field. I was successful in getting my A+ certification last spring, and saw that there was an opening for the IT Help Desk with my current company. I applied and was given an interview toward the end of the summer, but ultimate did not get the position, due to my lack of professional IT experience. At this moment, I'm considering searching for positions outside my company, but have some doubts about doing so - seeing as how I was denied a position at my current job, due to my lack of experience, would I just get the same results elsewhere? Would a Network+ certification improve my chances, or would I still face an uphill battle? Any tips or information you fine folks could share would be greatly appreciated.

The Network+ is not a bad idea, but honestly buying a few Udemy courses when they're on sale and spending a hour a night learning Linux, Powershell, or MySQL is going to be far more useful. Like force yourself to use only Linux for a month and you'll begin to hate life, but you'll hate life with a marketable skill.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

It doesnít matter. If you have the study materials and are ready to take the older test before itís depreciated, go for it.

Sec+ on my resume shows expiration date and cert number. Not version.

The real question is how many new versions of wardriving can CompTIA sneak in.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

Partial Octopus posted:

So I currently have a bachelors in biology and have been working at a tech company doing customer service for a few years now. I'm looking for a new career path and have been interested in IT for awhile now. I have experience building computers and doing repairs and such. I also have some experience with setting up home networks. If I'm looking to get into the IT/networking path what is the best way to start? I've heard different things from different people. Some say get the A+, some say go straight for the CCNA.

Any advice would be appreciated.

I would not go straight for a CCNA. Look at the ICND1 if you have some experience with networks already. You can get that without a home lab and it's mostly a lot of memorization. It's the weakest Cisco cert, but it probably beats a Network+ and is infinitely better than the A+. You can then work on getting your ICND2 which means you'd now have a CCNA.

Does your tech company offer any employee training? There are some technologies that are pretty difficult to learn on your own like Active Directory or Salesforce that are in demand these days.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

I'd call around to some tech-centric staffing agencies. If you don't know any names, go to dice.com and do a search in your area and you'll have a half dozen options fast. Get the name of a recruiter and call them up, ask if you can arrange a face to face meeting. You want to be on their radar so even if they have nothing now, they may call you when a good fit comes by.

If you know Linux, play that up. If you don't know Linux, download a distro and buy a book fast. You can look at certs, but you already have some experience. At this point you want an entry level IT job and they're not going to expect you to have too much experience and/or skills. If it's a big company they may propriety forks of software that they know you'll need training on regardless of your current skill level.

Don't feel too bad about your age and starting in an entry level position. Lots of people change careers and need to start over. Your past experience can still help give you a leg up over some 22 year Summer child.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

Martytoof posted:

I wish you luck, friend. About the only useful advice I can give is that almost every job I had in the last twenty years I found due to connections. Depending on where you live IT can be a tight circle. My recommendation to you is to pick an interest in the IT field and start looking for special interest groups on meetup.com. Interested in basic Windows administration? Join an Active Directory or Microsoft SIG. Interested in Linux? Join a Linux-centric SIG. Not interested in either? Join one anyway, attend a few and see if it piques your interest. Don't be shy, let people know you're eager about learning. There's a lot of "Professionals" meetups too that may or may not be relevant.

If you're looking for a job tomorrow then it likely won't happen because you attended a SIG. This is your long game.

To expand on this, people love to hire guys they know. It's less risk and IT in particular can have quirky personalities that don't mix well with others. One guy on my team got into a hissy fit because another person reflected on some hosed up corporate policies by calling the company bi-polar. Well we didn't know that one guy was bi-polar then, but we sure knew about it after our manager met with us individually in order to avoid a HR dust-up.

More than half of the jobs I've gotten have been through connections. All of my friends are better at technology than I am, but I keep getting opportunities because they know I'm not weird and I'll do my job without drama. So you don't even have to be good. Just consistent.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

Unless it's required for the job (Sec+) any toss up between a Cisco cert and a CompTIA cert always comes up Cisco.

I think the ICND1 is even cheaper than a CompTIA.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

Iím going to try for one a year. Got Sec+ last year, trying for ICND1 this year, and will aim for ICND2 next year.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

Katamari Democracy posted:

This semester in college is a little rough on me. The intro to networking is rough and it's sucking the life out of me on my off days. I loved Testout when I was learning to get my A+ but I am using the same program to just the intro to networking and it sucks so hard.

E- To be fair I only bombed one test and my instructor has given our class full permission to only use written notes during the tests. Hell the last two tests I did today I feel I didn't do too bad on them; an 88 theory and a 100 on the lab simulator.

Iíve been in networking for going on a decade now and it still feels like an alien concept sometimes. I learned almost everything on the job, which is great for practicality, but means Iíve got big gaps in my knowledge for stuff Iíve never had to do.

Itís strangely expensive, but the site networklessons.com does a good job of explaining networking technologies that you maybe havenít had experience with.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

Katamari Democracy posted:

Testout has come out with version 5 for their networking courses: http://www.testout.com/lp/network-pro-5

Have not really noticed much but I did see that they removed unnecessary information regarding network signaling, SCADA systems, some assessments from network policies .

But the labs load up a lot faster and are more stable than it has been. So that is a plus!


I went ahead and dumped 1 dollar and so far he is good at explaining things to me. Testout can sometimes be a little off so this is a welcome different point of view. I appreciate it!

My instructor also pointed me to Danscourses so I need to check him out as well.

I really like his diagramming actual actual router and switch command output. Most courses skip showing what each field means. Like I can run some commands and pick out the bit of data that I've been trained to look for, but it's good to know what all of the stuff means. He's also really good at showing the configs for each example. Now if it was only $20 a month instead of $40.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

Katamari Democracy posted:

I live in the USA and for me it's 29 dollars a month.

For some reason I thought it was $39.

Okay. I wish it was $20 instead of $29. I cancelled this month, but I will probably sign up again at some point when I can spend more time on the site.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

Messer (I think thatís his name) has a good Security+ cheat sheet for 10 bucks. Lots of data in an easy to read format and worth reading one or two of four times before taking the test.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

Does anyone know of a resource for Cisco labs I can build. Iím finally trying to get my home lab off the ground but I have no imagination.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

Oh Iíve got the lab already. 3 routers and 2 switches. Just havenít had a chance to start using it.

Then I got a little crazy and got a Juniper. Then I found a cheap console server. I havenít tried turning everything on at the same time. Iím not sure if it will be a pretty sight.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

Judge Schnoopy posted:

Gonna get loud as gently caress that's for sure. Hope you have a garage with good airflow.

It's in my home office.

ChubbyThePhat posted:

For what it's worth I like Juniper, but it will certainly be a little out of place studying for a Cisco cert.

My job uses Juniper and Cisco and I really suck at Juniper. So that's not there for certs.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

Kashuno posted:

Warchalking is the drawing of symbols in public places to advertise an open Wi-Fi network. Inspired by hobo symbols, the warchalking marks were conceived by a group of friends in June 2002 and publicised by Matt Jones who designed the set of icons and produced a downloadable document containing them

Contrary to popular belief, man traps are not inherently sexual or violent in nature.

Has anyone ever seen warchalks in real life? I have a feeling it's like quicksand in terms of realistic risks in life.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

rafikki posted:

For what it's worth, I got a job at a NOC with a CCENT. Guessing it at least got me through HR, then I did well on the phone and in person interviews.

For what it's worth I work in a NOC and I'm taking my CCENT next month. I've been in the industry awhile though. The intention is to finally get my CCNA in 2019.

Cert exams scare the piss out of me.

Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

Space Racist posted:

This is probably specific to the 501, but lots of people on Reddit mentioned having questions about a Poodle attack (downgrade from TLS to SSL).

Wait, something that is only a couple of years old? On a CompTIA test?

Excuse me while I update all my chalk marks.

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Krispy Wafer
Jul 26, 2002

I shouted out "Free the exposed 67"
But they stood on my hair and told me I was fat



Grimey Drawer

Irritated Goat posted:

My best friend finally convinced me to get back on the CCENT horse after failing it 3 times a couple years ago. Is there a good refresher set of videos? I tend to learn visually better.

I know subnetting was a bad weakness but I want to make sure I'm shored up on everything else again before I crack down on subnetting.

It's only hard cause I'm pretty terrible with numbers in my head when they get too large.

I'm taking the CCENT next month and reviewing subnetting last as well. It's one of those things that with great effort I can understand. But then I never use it and forget everything.

The best resource I've found is Subnetting Secrets by Paul Browning. You can probably find a bucket load of tutorials on YouTube also.

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