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AccidentalHipster
Jul 5, 2013

Whadda ya MEAN ya never heard of Dan Brereton?


Plague of Hats posted:

Hey so I made a site to put F&F reviews on both in case of thread archiving, to make them a bit easier to read (site formatting aside) and to allow them to be read despite the paywall. It is currently sparse, but I can copy-paste with the best of them. I am interested in getting permission from reviewers, though I can also abandon all my heroic work in the face of stern disapproval. Suggestions and pointers on how to make things look better or more readable are also a plus.

You have my full blessings to copy/paste my half-assed reviews.

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Flavivirus
Dec 13, 2011

The next stage of evolution.

citybeatnik posted:

My one experience of Wraith was set in Victorian London during the issues with the Broadstreet Pump and it was -awesome-, which only makes my own inabilities to get in to the game that much more of a heartbreaker.

Orpheus, meanwhile, can go gently caress itself.

Whatever, dude. Wraith is an excellent game of pathos and tragedy and the darkness inside, it's true, but Orpheus is an absolutely brilliant horror action movie of a game. The system's power structure is versatile and gives characters plenty of cool toys, and the metaplot is honestly the best metaplot I've seen written, never putting expectations on PC action or assuming an NPC is unkillable or unstoppable. Sure, it doesn't have Wraith's tone, but it's a hell of a ride.

...maybe I should write it up for F&F.

Mors Rattus
Oct 25, 2007

FATAL & Friends
Walls of Text
#1 Builder
2014-2018



Plague of Hats posted:

Hey so I made a site to put F&F reviews on both in case of thread archiving, to make them a bit easier to read (site formatting aside) and to allow them to be read despite the paywall. It is currently sparse, but I can copy-paste with the best of them. I am interested in getting permission from reviewers, though I can also abandon all my heroic work in the face of stern disapproval. Suggestions and pointers on how to make things look better or more readable are also a plus.

I say go for it. I will go look at the site later.

MonsieurChoc
Oct 12, 2013

Every species can smell its own extinction.


Flavivirus posted:

Whatever, dude. Wraith is an excellent game of pathos and tragedy and the darkness inside, it's true, but Orpheus is an absolutely brilliant horror action movie of a game. The system's power structure is versatile and gives characters plenty of cool toys, and the metaplot is honestly the best metaplot I've seen written, never putting expectations on PC action or assuming an NPC is unkillable or unstoppable. Sure, it doesn't have Wraith's tone, but it's a hell of a ride.

...maybe I should write it up for F&F.

Yeah, the campaign's pretty great. And as a Wraith fan I found the conclusion to be pretty awesome, thanks to all the little connections.

Wraith and Orpheus are both ghost games done by White Wolf, but they're very different takes on the subject. If anything, Orpheus is closer to Delta Green than the typical White Wolf game.

Ariamaki
Jun 30, 2011

"I'm the most powerful
search engine in the world!"
-- The GoogleProg


Plague of Hats posted:

Hey so I made a site to put F&F reviews on both in case of thread archiving, to make them a bit easier to read (site formatting aside) and to allow them to be read despite the paywall. It is currently sparse, but I can copy-paste with the best of them. I am interested in getting permission from reviewers, though I can also abandon all my heroic work in the face of stern disapproval. Suggestions and pointers on how to make things look better or more readable are also a plus.

I hereby give you full permission to repost anything I've written for the thread or will write for it in the future. I'm thinking of trying my hand at one of my favorite games, Risus, especially the adventure modules, over the course of the next few months.

Evil Mastermind
Apr 28, 2008



Plague of Hats posted:

Hey so I made a site to put F&F reviews on both in case of thread archiving, to make them a bit easier to read (site formatting aside) and to allow them to be read despite the paywall. It is currently sparse, but I can copy-paste with the best of them. I am interested in getting permission from reviewers, though I can also abandon all my heroic work in the face of stern disapproval. Suggestions and pointers on how to make things look better or more readable are also a plus.

Looks good to me; one question, though: how are you going to handle things like emotes in posts?

Alien Rope Burn
Dec 4, 2004

I wanna be a saikyo HERO!


Plague of Hats posted:

Hey so I made a site to put F&F reviews on both in case of thread archiving, to make them a bit easier to read (site formatting aside) and to allow them to be read despite the paywall. It is currently sparse, but I can copy-paste with the best of them. I am interested in getting permission from reviewers, though I can also abandon all my heroic work in the face of stern disapproval. Suggestions and pointers on how to make things look better or more readable are also a plus.

I'd love to see my own reviews backed up (Rifts, Pathfinder, Low Life), on account of me putting an entirely unreasonable amount of work into them.

Evil Mastermind
Apr 28, 2008



Alien Rope Burn posted:

I'd love to see my own reviews backed up (Rifts, Pathfinder, Low Life), on account of me putting an entirely unreasonable amount of work into them.

Just do what I did; filter the last thread on your posts and just save everything as web pages. :sperg:

ZeeToo
Feb 20, 2008

I'm a kitty!


Far as I'm concerned, do whatever the hell with what I've written.

And what good timing! Look what I've just found.

Bitchtits McGee
Jul 1, 2011


Plague of Hats posted:

I am interested in getting permission from reviewers, though I can also abandon all my heroic work in the face of stern disapproval.

I suppose I could try to come up with a reason to refuse, y'know, just to keep things interesting, but honestly I'm afraid I wouldn't be very good at it.

Cyphoderus posted:

Develop poison glans.

FIIIIIIIEEEEEEEELLLLDS!!

Alien Rope Burn
Dec 4, 2004

I wanna be a saikyo HERO!


Cyphoderus posted:

Now's maybe a good time to mention that there are zero creepy things about Double Cross. Not much to go all "Japan! " over.

I wouldn't go that far, but the percentage of creep is quite small for a Japanese game.

Evil Mastermind
Apr 28, 2008



Plague of Hats posted:

Hey so I made a site to put F&F reviews on both in case of thread archiving, to make them a bit easier to read (site formatting aside) and to allow them to be read despite the paywall. It is currently sparse, but I can copy-paste with the best of them. I am interested in getting permission from reviewers, though I can also abandon all my heroic work in the face of stern disapproval. Suggestions and pointers on how to make things look better or more readable are also a plus.

Oh yeah, and you have my permission.

oriongates
Mar 14, 2013

Validate Me!




Plague of Hats posted:

Hey so I made a site to put F&F reviews on both in case of thread archiving, to make them a bit easier to read (site formatting aside) and to allow them to be read despite the paywall. It is currently sparse, but I can copy-paste with the best of them. I am interested in getting permission from reviewers, though I can also abandon all my heroic work in the face of stern disapproval. Suggestions and pointers on how to make things look better or more readable are also a plus.

I have no problem with it.

Piell
Sep 3, 2006

Grey Worm's Ken doll-like groin throbbed with the anticipatory pleasure that only a slightly warm and moist piece of lemoncake could offer



Young Orc

Plague of Hats posted:

Hey so I made a site to put F&F reviews on both in case of thread archiving, to make them a bit easier to read (site formatting aside) and to allow them to be read despite the paywall. It is currently sparse, but I can copy-paste with the best of them. I am interested in getting permission from reviewers, though I can also abandon all my heroic work in the face of stern disapproval. Suggestions and pointers on how to make things look better or more readable are also a plus.

You can probably just go ahead and grab everybody's, I doubt anyone is going to have a problem with it.

wdarkk
Oct 26, 2007

Friends: Protected
World: Saved
Crablettes: Eaten


Wasn't someone doing a wiki of them? Or was that just a set of links to the posts?

EDIT: Yeah, silly me it's in the first post.

Halloween Jack
Sep 11, 2003

Let your word be "Yes, Yes" or "No, No"; anything more than this comes from the evil one.




Unless everyone prefers that Carcosa be buried for all eternity, I'm glad to have mine preserved.

Libertad!
Oct 30, 2013

You can have the last word, but I'll have the last laugh!

Halloween Jack posted:

Unless everyone prefers that Carcosa be buried for all eternity, I'm glad to have mine preserved.

Those who don't learn from history are doomed to repeat it. Your teachings must be passed down to newer generations.

Adnachiel
Oct 21, 2012


Plague of Hats posted:

Hey so I made a site to put F&F reviews on both in case of thread archiving, to make them a bit easier to read (site formatting aside) and to allow them to be read despite the paywall. It is currently sparse, but I can copy-paste with the best of them. I am interested in getting permission from reviewers, though I can also abandon all my heroic work in the face of stern disapproval. Suggestions and pointers on how to make things look better or more readable are also a plus.

You can repost my stuff, including the unfinished Demon one if you really want to.

AccidentalHipster
Jul 5, 2013

Whadda ya MEAN ya never heard of Dan Brereton?


ZeeToo posted:

Look what I've just found.


This... this... Is this available online? Because if so you need to post a link. Because this is going to be either awesome or stupid, and it'll most likely be both.

Zerilan
Jan 11, 2008

I have to believe I can do this.







AccidentalHipster posted:

This... this... Is this available online? Because if so you need to post a link. Because this is going to be either awesome or stupid, and it'll most likely be both.

It's basically a spinoff of the Pokemon Tabletop Adventures game he reviewed before where people thought more character complexity was apparently the core problem with PTA.

Red Metal
Oct 23, 2012

Let me tell you about Homestuck



Fun Shoe

AccidentalHipster posted:

This... this... Is this available online? Because if so you need to post a link. Because this is going to be either awesome or stupid, and it'll most likely be both.

http://forums.pokemontabletop.com/index/

Arashiofordo3
Nov 5, 2010

Warning, Internet
may prove lethal.


Ah yes, because there needed to be more Pokemon products. Still, is it any good? I've got a couple of friends who'd probably be interested in a Pokemon Role Play game.

Zerilan
Jan 11, 2008

I have to believe I can do this.







Arashiofordo3 posted:

Ah yes, because there needed to be more Pokemon products. Still, is it any good? I've got a couple of friends who'd probably be interested in a Pokemon Role Play game.

You'd be better off hacking MAOCT or something. PTU, like PTA before it, try to emulate the video game numbers and level grind a lot rather than try to work with the strengths/weaknesses of converting to tabletop.

Mr. Maltose
Feb 16, 2011

The Guffless Girlverine


Sorcerer exists as the secret Best Pokemon Game.

Cyphoderus
Apr 21, 2010

I'll have you know, foxes have the finest call in nature


Mr. Maltose posted:

Sorcerer exists as the secret Best Pokemon Game.
That Vincent Baker post is what ultimately convinced me to go and get Sorcerer. I wasn't disappointed.

Alien Rope Burn posted:

I wouldn't go that far, but the percentage of creep is quite small for a Japanese game.
There's a bunch of cliches that are kind of silly, like the main character in one of the sample adventures being madly in love with a classmate in that anime way, or the classic centuries-old entity trapped in a little girl's bodies, but there's not anything that's disturbing for real, I believe.

Plague of Hats posted:

Hey so I made a site to put F&F reviews on both in case of thread archiving, to make them a bit easier to read (site formatting aside) and to allow them to be read despite the paywall. It is currently sparse, but I can copy-paste with the best of them. I am interested in getting permission from reviewers, though I can also abandon all my heroic work in the face of stern disapproval. Suggestions and pointers on how to make things look better or more readable are also a plus.
My things are free game, do whatever you gotta do with them!

AccidentalHipster posted:

I actually bought DX last night and I'm still waiting for it to come in the mail. The write-up so far is making me very happy with my decision. I am curious about a few things though. First, is the Martial Artist/Librarian example correct? Because the way you describe it, it seems that Martial Artist should be the cover. Second, would it be alright if we suggested characters to make? Because I kinda want to see if I could make Santana (the Pillar Man, not the band) in this system.
Nah, Work is what gives you skills. If you want your schtick to be "you fight things", that's gotta go into Work. Cover is the role you play in society, Work is your actual set of skills.

I'm not a big fan of JoJo's, but looking at a wiki it seems to me your guy is straight-up a pure-breed Exile. Growing swords out of ribs, changing the location of vital organs to avoid damage, absorbing dudes into your body and detaching body parts are the very specialties of an Exile. If you want, you can describe the abilities and when we reach the powers I'll try and give examples that relate.

Mr. Maltose
Feb 16, 2011

The Guffless Girlverine


Put on the Stone Mask of Aja and get the Chimera powerset free!

Halloween Jack
Sep 11, 2003

Let your word be "Yes, Yes" or "No, No"; anything more than this comes from the evil one.




One of the things that surprises me about DX is the apparent lack of a straightforward "Brick" syndrome, or a straightforward one for telepathy or teleportation. That's okay, though. An original evocative setting is better than one which strives to be generic. I like that Greg Stolze's ORE games, to my knowledge, flat-out exclude time travel and mind control.

BryanChavez
Sep 13, 2007

Custom: Heroic
Having A Life: Fair


Cyphoderus posted:

I'm not a big fan of JoJo's, but looking at a wiki it seems to me your guy is straight-up a pure-breed Exile. Growing swords out of ribs, changing the location of vital organs to avoid damage, absorbing dudes into your body and detaching body parts are the very specialties of an Exile. If you want, you can describe the abilities and when we reach the powers I'll try and give examples that relate.

Yeah, Santana is flat-out an Exile. Esidisi would be Bram Stoker/Exile and Kars would be Angel Halo/Exile. I don't see any wind/breath-based abilities in the Syndromes, so the only Pillar Man you couldn't make as a character is Wamuu. Which is unfortunate, because Wamuu is the best Pillar Man.

I was going to say 'nerding out aside', but that sounds ridiculous when you're moving from talking about manga to talking about RPGs, so: moving from one medium of nerding to another medium of nerding, Double Cross looks awesome, and I'm absolutely going to buy it unless you reveal something godawful about it soon. I love when anything in the superhuman genre tries to do something thematic with powers, instead of just being another Generic Superhero game.

ZeeToo
Feb 20, 2008

I'm a kitty!


Arashiofordo3 posted:

Ah yes, because there needed to be more Pokemon products. Still, is it any good? I've got a couple of friends who'd probably be interested in a Pokemon Role Play game.

I'm still reserving judgment on this one! I'll keep you updated, though. For those who want to follow along or take their own peek, the most current PDFs can be found here.

Pokemon Tabletop United, Part 1.

"United" here is a joke. Probably intentionally. PTU is a spinoff of Pokemon Tabletop Adventures, which I've looked at before. I don't know the internal politics here and won't claim to speak for the people involved, but apparently some of the PTA people recognized some of PTA's fundamental flaws and decided to take another stab at it, essentially forking the project.

In theory, they've at least addressed most of the glaring conceptual flaws of PTA, but we'll see how well they play out in practice. Like PTA, PTU is a massive undertaking with more wordcount than many systems I've paid money for, so there's a lot of parts to consider here.



I'm not entirely sure why Doxy feels a need to clarify tricky rules in side bars with their name attached instead of in the text they're already writing, but okay. Hi there, Doxy!

For a four hundred page pdf, the game opens promisingly, with the usual "what is this" and then telling us what we actually need to read over to get started and separating out what can be picked over when it comes up.

The first chapter is the basic mechanics, starting with the basics trainers have and going through everything from combats to contests before we fill in the blanks on what our abilities are. Trainers are no longer bizarre d20 freaks with absurd stat limits. Now we have Mind/Body/Spirit attributes with specific skills underneath each. A little bit Tri-stat in appearance, but not in execution. These are ranked from -2 to +6.

Trainers also have action points, which serve as their MP to power features or give yourself +1 to a check.

quote:

Trainers have a maximum Action Point pool equal to 5, plus 1 more for every 5 trainer levels they have achieved; a Level 15 Trainer would have a maximum of 6 Action Points, for example.

Someone forgot to update all the numbers, it looks like.

Trainers also have Skills. At rank 1 to 6, you roll Xd6, starting at rank 2, then add the relevant attribute. So if you're rolling Athletics, you roll your Xd6 Athletics, then add your Body. Sensible enough; I'm good with all of this except maybe the "Combat" skill, since I don't tend to think about fighting trainers when I think Pokemon. One or two of you may already know that if you read the PTA review, though.


Everyone, Trainer or Pokemon, shares six stats: HP, Attack, Defense, Special Attack, Special Defense, Speed, which are used to derive Hit Points (HP and Hit Points are different things? ) and Evasion, Special Evasion, and Speed Evasion. Pick the highest relevant one if something attacks you. This is definitely a massive improvement over PTA: now everyone is playing the same game.

Combat stages are still a little too calculator-riffic for me:


...but at least they work for everyone.

Everyone gets your D&D4e actions-per-turn, though they've changed the terms up a bit (shift action instead of move). There's some perfectly functional rules on what constitutes whose action and what type of action that is to put Pokemon in balls or take them out again.

quote:

An Accuracy Roll is always simply 1d20, but is modified by the user's Accuracy and by certain Moves and other
effects. Note that modifiers to Accuracy Rolls do not affect effects from Moves that occur upon specific results, or
increase critical hit range. These effects

For example, if you use Flamethrower with an Accuracy Bonus of +4 and roll a 16, this would not be neither a critical
hit, nor inflict a Burn.

I probably won't point out all of the missing or conflicting details. You get the idea. It's still relatively easy to follow, but this is extremely unpolished.

Damage is probably the worst offender in this section:

It's as simple as that!

Basic ("struggle") attacks, combat maneuvers, three different types of status effects, healing, death, coup de grace, resting, terrain, suffocating, fall damage... basically there's a lot of pages of dry reading here, without pictures or much other spice as of yet. Refer to it when you need it in play.

Most of the rest of this section is that sort of thing. The only really notable bit is 'injuries'. Whenever you cross 50%/0%/-50%/-100%/etc damage, or take more than 50% damage from one hit, you take one 'injury'. Since you're guaranteed to cross one with the 50% damage hit, I'm not sure if that's a useless rule or if it gives you two injuries. Each injury lowers max HP by 10% until you get to a Pokemon center. Doxy drops by to tell us that these are easily removed if we don't like the tone they create, but suggests keeping it to give larger, rotating teams value and for the attrition during long adventures.

That's... yeah, okay, non-ironic thanks. Whether or not any given campaign uses that, we're given the dial and told what it does.



focus corner: HP, Max HP, and Hit Points. HP is a stat that is used as part of a formula to derive your Max HP. Your Hit Points is a number not to exceed your Max HP denoting your current still-standing-ness. The game doesn't actually fully adhere to this; as you'd expect, things do HP damage and moves can set your HP to a certain number. In fact, I think it uses HP to mean Hit Points exclusively, except where it mentions HP-the-stat and carefully defines them as different.


That's the combat side of things; the rest of this chapter deals with contests. We'll look at that and probably start with trainers next time, as the contests are not as crunchy as the combat rules.

Forums Terrorist
Dec 8, 2011



Crunch delenda est.

Cyphoderus
Apr 21, 2010

I'll have you know, foxes have the finest call in nature




DOUBLE CROSS

Part III - Exchange students and blood drinkers


No matter which method of character creation you pick, at the end you'll be doing Personal Data. This consists on a series of 1d100 Roll-or-Choose tables that say what your character's background is like. It's also the point where you build Loises. A Lois is a relationship your character has with an NPC or another PC. The terminology is really strange until you realise it's a reference to Lois Lane, and it makes all the sense in the world.

Loises are kind of a big deal. Your relationships are what keep you human when you are on the brink of losing yourself to the Renegade. This is their big function, mechanically. They also serve as big plot hooks.

First step of Personal Data is Origin. This mostly refers to your family, and what kind of home you come from. This is a big influence on the life of the character, whether they are young and have to directly deal with parents and such or they are older and suffer a more indirect influence from family life. Options here are mostly boring: examples include having a brother or sister, having parents that know about the Renegade, having foster parents, etc. Your Origin comes with a recommended Lois. For most options, that's the father or mother themselves, but there's more uncommon choices. For instance, if you come from a rich household, the recommended Lois is with a personal tutor of some kind.

Next up is Experience. This is a big event that happened in your character's life. Experience has four distinct tables: student, adult, criminal and UGN. Pick the table that best fits the lifestyle of the character and roll on it. Each table has, predictably, its own flavour and set of experiences. A bunch of experiences are shared between them, like having been hospitalised for a long time, having lost someone dear to you, keeping contact with your first love, or the ever-classic amnesia.

Students have experiences like making important promises, studying abroad, and forming undying bonds of friendships. Adults have things like marriage, career success or bankruptcy. Criminals have things like being an underground legend, having caused someone great pain, and having been headline news once. People with UGN experiences have things like despising non-Overed humans, having been born in a UGN test tube, and having been a member of False Hearts in the past. Each Experience option also comes with a recommended Lois related to it.

The last of the "life history" steps is Encounter. This is interesting, and reminds me of a more down-to-earth version of 13th Age's icons. You roll on the table and you get a certain relatioship with one of the setting's established NPCs. For instance, you might find out you have unfinished business with Alexander Cauldwell, the founder of the UGN who recently went missing. Or that you answer directly to Yugo Kiritani, the chief of Japan's UGN branch. You may owe a deb to Therese Blum, a British member of the UGN's central committee. The recommended Lois of this part is the NPC in question.

This means that character creation, as written, gives each PC a direct tie to the established setting. I like this, it's full of potential to tie sweeping tales of conspiracy and politics into the personal lives of the characters, which is kind of the entire point. It also means that if you want to play in different setting, say, Cambodia or Australia, you have to come up with enough NPCs to make this table interesting, or at least reskin the Japanese NPCs to people more appropriate to your own setting.

At this point we get to determine our Awakening. This is the circumstance in which the Renegade awakened in you, the moment you became an Overed. Different from the other tables thus far, this one is 1d10. We have the usual suspects, like having a near-death experience, seeing someone you care about being killed in front of you, or being really, really angry. There are also more exotic options like having been experimented on, or being "ordered to evolve".

Last up in Personal Data is the Impulse. This is the weird thing the Renegade compels you to do. That gnawing feeling at the back of your head that grow stronger the closer you are to becoming a Gjaum. Like Awakening, this is a 1d10 table. The Renegade is not nice, and the available Impulses are... not pretty, to say the least. They include drinking blood, torturing others, challenging the strongest opponents to fights to the death, becoming extremely paranoid, self-mutilation... Impulses aren't something you can easily bend to your advantage; they're bad, and any sane Overed will find themselves struggling hard to fight them back and keep the Renegade under control. Your Impulse is most likely the basal urge that will take over if you surrender your mind and become a Gjaum.

Characters have an Encroachment Rate, which is how much the Renegade has encroached on their minds. Starting rate is determined by Awakening and Impulse: each has an associated rate. Add them together and you get your starting ER.

Now how do you build a Lois? It's simple. First, pick a target: it is usually another person, but it can be an organisation or ideal if it makes sense and matters a lot to your character. Second, each Lois is associated with one positive emotion and one negative emotion. There are 1d100 RoC tables for both. Third, pick one of the emotions, either the positive or negative one, to be the conscious emotion: the one you show to the world, the one you act upon, the one you admit to yourself. The other emotion becomes the subconscious one. You either keep it hidden deep down, or are not even much aware that it exists.

This is a relationship system that minimises needless complexity but still manages to capture a lot of subtlety. I like it a lot.



A Worked Example

Let's give a concrete example, and go through the steps of Personal Data for a hypothetical character Mr. Tanaka (the Japanese equivalent of Mr. Smith).

First up, Origin. We roll 51, for Noble parents: your family is from a noble background. Maybe we can interpret this literally and say we're descendants of royalty? Maybe we're rich and posh, and look down on the poor? Maybe our family just displays a lot of honour and is admired by the local community. The recommended Lois for this is father/mother.

For Experience, let's say Mr. Tanaka is an adult. We roll on the adult table and get 97, for Forbidden love: you are involved with the wrong person. Oooo, interesting. Now we're talking! Our recommended Lois is our lover. As an aside: if we were a student, this would've been Promise: you swore to forever protect a promise. If we were a criminal, we would've gotten Lone wolf: you live a solitary life. The UGN table would've produced Major msitake: your mistake jeopardised a mission. The recommended Loises for those are, respectively, the person you swore to, an adversary, and a Gjaum. Just to illustrate what these tables look like and their differences.

We have then our Encounter. We rolled 26, for Family: this person is like family or is family, with Satsuki Kamishiro. Looking at the setting chapter, we discover she is an 18-year old executive, president of the Kamishiro group, one of Japan's biggest conglomerates. The organisation works together with the UGN in the area of Renegade research.

Time for Awakening and Impulse. For the first, we get 2, for Experimentation. We were part of an experimented, and among many candidates, were lucky (or unlucky) enough to walk away from it with our lives, but becoming an Overed. For Impulse, we rolled 3, for Slaughter. We get the urge to kill people, not out of hatred, but because we just enjoy watching people struggling to hold onto dear life.

Experimentation's base Encroachment Rate is 16; Slaughter's is 18. Our starting Encroachment Rate is 34%. Starting rates vary from 28% to 36%, ours is in the upper range.

Time for Loises. We could make our own, but we decide to go with the recommended ones. This means we have a parent, a lover, and a young genius executive to go through.

Let's say our family is honourable and traditional, and let's arbitrarily say our Lois is our noble father. For positive emotion, we roll 73, Obsession: you can't stop thinking about the other person. For negative, we get 7, Threat: you feel threatened by the other person. An... interesting combination for a parent, and one that's supposed to be "noble"! I can feel the plot forming. We must pick a conscious emotion, let's go with the positive one: we are huge fans of dad and everyone knows about it, we can't stop talking about him. Deep down, we're afraid of him. Why could that be?

Time to figure out who our lover is. For positive, we get 55, the other person reminds you of the people who have passed away. For negative, we get 56, you hate the other person. Now we could go with this and interpret it in a potentially great manner, but just to remind you guys that this is Roll-or-Choose, I think this kind of makes no sense and I'm just going to pick options I like better. Let's go with a classic: our positive emotion is Love, and our negative one if Inferiority. Love is our conscious one. So we have this person we love deeply, but deep down, we feel we're inferior to them and maybe we don't deserve their love.

Lastly, Satsuki Kamishiro. She's like family to us; let's figure out how. For positive, we get 51, for the same Dying Wishes we had at first with our lover. For negative, we get 91, Anger: this person's ideals or actions make you feel furious. I like these. To mix things up, let's say our conscious emotion is the negative one. Miss Kamishiro is like a sister to us, but her actions make us angry; it's like one of those sorts of rival-like fraternal love. Deep down, she reminds us of someone: maybe we had a sibling or someone really dear to us who died, and the adoption of Satsuki into our family has something to do with it.

So this is what Personal Data looks like. I hope I got to show how great Loises are for being both easy to create and having the potential to be really subtle. They're also great plot hooks, and in my opinion the very best starting point for a "character-based" story. You can do so many things with them, from the classical putting-your-loved-ones-in-danger to incorporating them fully into the conspiracies and mysteries of the setting. As a GM, you don't have to step on eggs when messing with the characters the PCs have Loises with: Loises are expected to be dynamic, to change. The mechanics surrounding them make it impossible for relationships to remain static.

This update has gone on longer than I thought it would. Let's cut it off; I'm trying to keep things short to make them more readable.

Next time, we take on Construction character creation, to take a closer look at the elements of a character sheet in a more mechanical way. In the process, we'll learn about the game's wealth and gear system, Overed breeds, and Works.

I'm taking things in order. To give you guys perspective: the update after the next one, we'll look at the mechanics behind powers. From there on we'll have all the knowledge we need to start looking at the Syndromes themselves. I plan on doing a series of Syndrome Dossiers between regular updates, where we get to learn about what each Syndrome specifically has to offer.

My only concern is that we run out of art before running out of book

Next time: UGN Agent! Detective! Researcher! Programmer...! Housewife...? Stage magician?!

Tulul
Oct 23, 2013


Cyphoderus posted:

I'm not a big fan of JoJo's, but looking at a wiki it seems to me your guy is straight-up a pure-breed Exile. Growing swords out of ribs, changing the location of vital organs to avoid damage, absorbing dudes into your body and detaching body parts are the very specialties of an Exile. If you want, you can describe the abilities and when we reach the powers I'll try and give examples that relate.

What's the defining difference between Chimera and Exile? They both sound kind of similar, from this. Double Cross also looks pretty great and you got me to order it, so thanks!

Anyway, I figured I would cover Numenera. It has it's own thread, but I think it deserves to be written up here. It has the promise of a fantastic setting, but I feel it makes some missteps, and the rules take a fumbling stab at elegance and end up putting a hole in their own foot. I would appreciate any feedback or the like, because it's my first time trying to write one of these things.



What is Numenera?

Have you ever seen a picture of what I would term "dudes staring off into the horizon"? A picture that promises mystery, excitement, and adventure, right after they get done posing on top of a cliff?



Well, Numenera is Dudes Staring Off Into the Horizon: The RPG. Numenera takes place on Earth a billion years in the future (in the "Ninth World"), and the titular artifacts are all of the wondrous and dangerous things that have been left behind by countless dead civilizations.

Numenera is a game pulled from the dreams of Monte Cook, written by Monte Cook, designed by Monte Cook, and published by Monte Cook Games. It is about as Monte Cook a game as you will ever get. It had a wildly successful Kickstarter and spawned an even more successful Kickstarter for a game in the setting by inXile.

Credited is Monte Cook, Cook's old D&D buddy Sean K. Reynolds as a "rules developer", and Shanna Germain for "additional writing" and as the lead editor. If you don't know who Shanna Germain is, well, neither did I. The book helpfully links her website, though, and uh.

quote:

"Shanna Germain is one of those rare authors in erotica who knows how to tell a good story and how to convey a scene of excitement and passion. Many writers can do one or the other. Some of them are able to do both. But there are few who are able to combine storytelling and passion with Shanna Germain’s mastery of the craft." ~Ashley Lister

MOVING ON!

Dreaming of the Future

Next we come to the somewhat pretentiously titled introduction and are introduced to the uncredited layout editor, Mr. GIGANTIC loving MARGINS.

No, seriously, look at these things:



That is not an economical use of space. It doesn't really justify them, either, mostly putting in some fairly unnecessary page references and the occasional fluff expansion.

The actual introduction starts off by quoting Clarke's Third Law and then with a couple of paragraphs that I want to quote verbatim:

Monte Cook posted:

I’m a dreamer. I’ve had a lot of dreams. But for twenty years, two dreams of mine have stuck with me, no
matter what else I was doing or what I was working on. Projects came and went, but these two dreams
always hovered in the background.

The first was a roleplaying game system where players got to decide how much effort they wanted to put into
any given action, and that decision would help determine whether their action would succeed or fail. This would
be a simple but elegant system where sustained damage and physical exertion drew from the same resource (so
as you became wounded, you could do less, and as you became exhausted, you were easier to take down). Where
your willpower and your mental “power points” were the same thing, and as you drew on your mental resources,
your ability to stave off mental attacks waned. And where it was all so integrated into the character that it was easy
to process and keep track of. But most of all, I dreamed of a game system that was designed from the ground up
to be played the way people actually played games, and to be run the way that game masters really ran them.

The second dream that stuck with me was a world that fused science fiction and fantasy, but not in the usual
mixed-genre sort of way. Instead, it was a place that felt like fantasy but was actually science fiction. Or perhaps it
felt like science fiction but was actually fantasy. Could I achieve both at once? The well-known quote from Sir Arthur
C. Clarke that “any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic” seemed to lie at the heart of
this concept. In my mind, I envisioned strangely garbed priests chanting well-rehearsed prayers and invocations,
using sacred instruments and making precise gestures, but then we realize that the instruments are technological
in nature, and some of the gestures are actually fingers playing over buttons or sections of a touchscreen...

I wasn't joking about this game being pulled from Cook's dreams. Anyway, I'd just like you to keep these two paragraphs in mind. We'll see how the game measures up.

Next he talks a lot about his career and inspirations! That's... kind of it, I can't find anything interesting to write about this, beyond approvingly nodding at his choice of Gene Wolfe and Moebius. We do learn that he's "never been a GM who relied heavily on rules", though, which should surprise absolutely no one that's ever played D&D 3.5.

Then Monte Cook wishes us well and we are into the requisite opening fiction!

The Amber Monolith

quote:

The Catechism of Lore:

All glory to the originators of truth and understanding.
Praise to the innovators of steel and synth.
Praise to the shapers of flesh, of bone, and of mind.
Glory to those who re-sculpted the sustaining earth and the life-giving sun.
Praise to the senders of signals, who even now whisper into machine ears and give life to the inanimate.
Praise to those who traveled to the stars, and the realms beyond the stars.
All glory to the originators of truth and understanding.

Let us then resume the recitation of the Sacred Chronicle of High Father Calaval, Amber Pope and Founder of the Citadel
of the Conduit and the Order of Truth, as written by his grandniece, Doroa of the Silent Song:

We join our hero Calaval in Chapter IX: Wind of Iron (In which we learn the lesson of dedication.), as he and his thuman (a horse, but not) Feddik are climbing a red, dusty hill towards a gigantic amber monolith. We then get a brief bout of exposition, learning that they're on the Plain of Brick, as the people in the last village they were in called it (herding "shereh" and giving food for "shins"). Calaval thinks they're swell if unimaginative, because a lot of small villages tend to be rather insular and most are dicks to strangers. There are also people called Aeon Priests who know stuff about the numenera and get to tell everyone to stop poking the ancient death machines with sticks. Calaval wants to be one!

Then, oh poo poo, dust storm!

Then, oh poo poo, Iron Wind!

The Iron Wind is a gigantic cloud of tiny particles that alters flesh instead of just ripping at it. Calaval notes that he doesn't know whether "particles" is the right word; it could be made up of machines or creatures for all he knows.

Our hero gets down to the business of surviving, pulling out a small handheld device designed to be held by someone with six fingers, that has two exposed wires in a cavity on it's surface. He jams an awl into the exposed wires and it creates a force field that smells like ozone, protecting him and Feddik from the Iron Wind. It also completely numbs his hand, then his arm, making him progressively weaker as he holds onto it.

In the middle of all this, Feddik gets loose and sticks part of his body outside of the field before Calaval can drag him back in. After the Wind has passed, our hero sees that Feddik's left side has been turned into a mass of tendrils, metallic plates, unknown orifices, and eyes.

The nothorse is in massive pain, so Calaval cuts his throat and cries.

quote:

Calaval did not curse the gods his mother had taught him, nor did he pray to them for mercy. It wasn’t that he did not believe in vast, nonhuman intelligences living in the sky above—he had see them orbiting in Yessai’s telescope night after night—he just did not believe that they directed events. He believed in cause and effect. Not gods. Even the things inhabiting the datasphere were created, the result of someone’s knowledge and understanding. He believed in the universe and its laws, set in motion billions of years earlier.

Just because the people of this world called it magic did not mean that he could not see beyond. That was what the Aeon
Priests did, and—as hard as it was to accept—that is what he would do too. The numenera, as the priests called it, arose because of the intellect of the people of the prior worlds. It only seemed like miracles.

It only seemed like damnation.



Next, Chapter X! Except not, because it's been lost. The people who are writing this believe it details Calaval's infinite capacity for love, amazing intelligence, perfect memory, astounding wisdom, and it was this long.

Chapter XI, then.

Calaval has reached the Monolith and eases us in with some infodumping. "Cyphers" are a type of numenera that are temporary, one-shot deals. They believe they were once part of much bigger machines and they only work some of the time. Calaval has a mesh belt (not made for humans) that lets him float up the side of the Monolith to a hatch hundreds of feet above the ground. He manages to grab onto the handle right before the belt's power gives out, sending him downwards and dislocating his shoulder. He almost passes out from the pain, but manages to work a lever and barely get himself inside a shaft with a ladder, losing his pack in the process.



Chapter XII has Calaval making the long, painful climb up the ladder. The entire structure is vibrating, and Calaval recognizes the rhythm, thinking that it's the one he had been looking for. When he gets to the top, he uses a match to make sure it's safe, and then collapses for a bit. Then he resets his shoulder, which takes him four tries of ramming it against the wall, and makes me wince in sympathy. After he succeeds, he wanders around for a bit, making a torch out of some machine scrap.

Then he awakens the MECHA-APE (seriously) and there's a chase scene! He goes back down the way he came, the mecha-ape tracking him. He grabs a sharpish piece of tubing, climbs down the ladder, and then jams it into the thing when it comes down after him. This knocks him off the ladder, close to the ground, and he loses consciousness for a bit. When he comes to, the mecha-ape is lying on the ground with three feet of scrap in it's chest and is still alive, but dying pretty fast. Calaval wants to mercy-kill it, but has no idea where to stab it, and it could kill him if he gets close, anyway. So he just sits in the dark and thinks about his nothorse until the mecha-ape dies.

Chapter XIII! Last one. After it dies, he cuts the mechanical bits apart to take some scrap pieces with him, particularly it's glowing eyes so he doesn't have to keep lighting matches anymore. He starts back up the tower, moving more slowly, and sleeps for a little while. After he reaches the top of the 23rd shaft, the vibration reaches it's peak, and he figures he's found the heart of the machine.

There's a giant blue cylinder floating in midair and Calaval starts looking around for a way inside. He eventually finds a door in the machine, with an access panel nearby. Trying to pry it open with his knife just snaps the blade, so he pulls out a gravity gun he cut out of the mecha-ape and rips the panel off the wall. He fucks around with some symbols for a while, opens the door, walks in, and is suddenly IN SPACE, aboard one of the stations he used to look up at.

Calaval hopes to find an AI and ask it some questions, and then it's the end of the story. It is reiterated that he's Future Science Jesus and that's that.

Next time: The actual game!

Tulul fucked around with this message at 23:39 on Nov 7, 2013

AccidentalHipster
Jul 5, 2013

Whadda ya MEAN ya never heard of Dan Brereton?


Cyphoderus posted:

Nah, Work is what gives you skills. If you want your schtick to be "you fight things", that's gotta go into Work. Cover is the role you play in society, Work is your actual set of skills.

I'm not a big fan of JoJo's, but looking at a wiki it seems to me your guy is straight-up a pure-breed Exile. Growing swords out of ribs, changing the location of vital organs to avoid damage, absorbing dudes into your body and detaching body parts are the very specialties of an Exile. If you want, you can describe the abilities and when we reach the powers I'll try and give examples that relate.

Ah, I see. The "people still refer to him as that martial artist guy" part was what confused me.

As for Santana, his powers are pretty much "highly evolved being with control over his body" and "highly evolved genius". Aside from the powers you mentioned, he could also regenerate wounds easily (especially after absorbing blood and other biomass), absorb bullets he was shot with and shoot them back with his fingers, learn how to speak a language or field strip a gun in seconds, twist himself to slip through an air vent, and hide in the bodies of others to control them (even giving his meat puppets a sense of euphoria in the process ). He was turned to stone by sunlight, but I don't think that counts as a power.

Kurieg
Jul 19, 2012


Plague of Hats posted:

Hey so I made a site to put F&F reviews on both in case of thread archiving, to make them a bit easier to read (site formatting aside) and to allow them to be read despite the paywall. It is currently sparse, but I can copy-paste with the best of them. I am interested in getting permission from reviewers, though I can also abandon all my heroic work in the face of stern disapproval. Suggestions and pointers on how to make things look better or more readable are also a plus.

Yeah go ahead and copy my stuff over. People who want to read about oWerewolf can read about it.

Alien Rope Burn
Dec 4, 2004

I wanna be a saikyo HERO!


Cyphoderus posted:

There's a bunch of cliches that are kind of silly, like the main character in one of the sample adventures being madly in love with a classmate in that anime way, or the classic centuries-old entity trapped in a little girl's bodies, but there's not anything that's disturbing for real, I believe.

There's nothing Maid-like, no, there's just some stuff around the edges that's ANIME! , but I don't feel like nitpicking at it, I like the game and it's fine.

Tulul posted:

What's the defining difference between Chimera and Exile? They both sound kind of similar, from this. Double Cross also looks pretty great and you got me to order it, so thanks!

Those who order the game now are lucky, and get to miss out on the heavy errata the first printing had! But to be fair, the publisher sent out errata sheets at their own expense, which was really cool of them. (Mind, I think it might be related to the fact that they don't have PDF version.

Tulul posted:

We do learn that he's "never been a GM who relied heavily on rules", though, which should surprise absolutely no one that's ever played D&D 3.5.

It's loving hilarious given the three games he's mainly written for - Rolemaster, Champions, and D&D 3e - are each literally monoliths of rules a la 2001.

Fossilized Rappy
Dec 26, 2012


Plague of Hats posted:

Hey so I made a site to put F&F reviews on both in case of thread archiving, to make them a bit easier to read (site formatting aside) and to allow them to be read despite the paywall. It is currently sparse, but I can copy-paste with the best of them. I am interested in getting permission from reviewers, though I can also abandon all my heroic work in the face of stern disapproval. Suggestions and pointers on how to make things look better or more readable are also a plus.
As pretty much everyone else has stated, I'm down with it.




Part 2: Classes Big and Small


Base Classes
In Northern Crown, most of hte core D&D classes exist, save for five – the Barbarian, Fighter, Monk, Ranger, and Rogue have been axed. In their stead, seven new base classes exist, be they a “superior” replacement of an existing class, one believed to be more fitting, or in at least one case something new entirely.

Agent: The Agent is a spy, saboteur, or some similarly sneaky sort. D6 hit die, poor Fortitude save progression, and average Base Attack Bonus progression is made up for by good Reflex and Will save progression, sneak attack and evasion-related abilities inherited from the axed Rogue, and class features related to deceit. Most of these are based on granting benefits to the use of the Hide skill in urban environments or indoors or synergizing Bluff and Hide, with the exception of the 6th level Agent class feature Undectable Alignment, which does exactly what it says.

Natural Philosopher: Perhaps the most involved of the new classes, the Natural Philosopher can be summed up as being the prototype of the technomage archetype. They are heavily focused on their class features over combat, with d4 hit die, lovely Base Attack Bonus progression, average Fortitude and Reflex save progression, and good Will save progression. They use crazy levels of to create inventions as well as produce phenomena, which are spells that count as extraordinary abilities. This means that the Natural Philosopher can do the same thing a Wizard can but totally ignore spell resistance, anti-magic fields, and anything else that targets spells and spell-like abilities specifically. This is tempered by the fact that they can only replicate a handful of spells based on what “degrees” they have, and even if they get all six degrees by 20th level - which would horribly nerf how much power they have in each degree, as ranks in each degree act like caster levels - the total number of phenomena still isn’t terribly high. There's also the fact that each degree requires a material focus that may be somewhat disadvantageous. The six degrees are as follows:
  • Antimagic: The degree of antimagic seeks to learn about how magic works in order to detect and combat it. Its phenomena replicate spells such as detect undead, dispel magic, and undeath to death. The focus for antimagic is a loudly whirring gear-filled astronomical clock.
  • Life and Death: This degree deals with medicinal and poisonous phenomena including the various cure wounds spells, blight, and finger of death. The focus is a wooden apothecary kit with compartments dedicated to the centaurs Chiron (healing) and Nessus (harming).
  • Magnetism: The magnetism degree is sort of a hodge-podge of replicating spells that are electrical, force, pushing, or pulling in nature, including hold person, spider climb, and chain lightning. The focus is a magnet-studded leather belt.
  • Matter: More or less elementalism, with a tuning fork as the focus. Its phenomena include stoneshape, control water, and wall of fire.
  • Mentalism: The powers of the mind. The spells its phenomena replicate are just what you'd expect, with popular enchantments and divinations like confusion, scrying, and dominate person popping up. The focus for casting mentalist phenomena is a tinfoil silver weave hat.
  • Physics: In spite of its name making it seem like it would be the same as matter, the physics degree replicates spells with light and darkness, sound, and dimensional fabric such as displacement, shout, and sunbeam. The focus for physics is a quartz wand.
In addition to all this hooplah about phenomena, Natural Philosophers are capable of creating automatons, crafting weird inventions, and turning undead (undead are animated by magic, after all). We won't actually be seeing any inventions or automatons until the Gazetteer, though.


Raider: Anarchist guerrillas, Vinlander vikings, and First Nations ambush warriors are a few examples of what the Raider base class is meant to replicate. D12 hit die, good Reflex and Fortitude save progession, somewhat above average Will save progression, and full Base Attack Bonus progression means they can both give and take one hell of a beating, and this is further improved by Barbarian rage, damage reduction, and a dose of dodge and speed-enhancing class features. Basically, the Raider is the Barbarian with no bad saves and can tear poo poo up.


Rake: Rakes are flamboyant, grandiose fighters who love sword or pistol duels, witty repartee, and the sound of their own voices. The class gets d8 hit die, good Reflex and Fortitude save progression, and good Base Attack Bonus progression. Pretty much all of the Rake's class features focus on attacks of opportunity and combat tricks to give them the advantage in a fight, as well as one particularly odd class feature called Scarring Attack that lets them have an attack deal Charisma damage instead of normal HP damage.


Scout: The Scout is basically a Raider with d10 instead of d12 hit die and a mixture of sneak attack and animal companion features replacing rage. While the last game I reviewed that had a Scout base class had them be super-underpowered compared to the other classes, here we have a Scout going the opposite direction. Weird.


Soldier: If you like standard D&D Fighters, you'll love the Soldier - after all, they both have the same "bonus feats are my only class feature" aspect. The only differences between the two, in fact, are that the Soldier has better Reflex save progression than the Fighter and that the Soldier's bonus feats are limited based on what military archetype they take (dragoon, grenadier, halberdier, hussar, musketeer, royal guard, or swordsman).


Witch: Witches are arcane spellcasters that get their power from demons, either by stealing it from them if they are good or neutral witches or by sealing soul-ownership pacts if they are evil witches. They have the standard spellcaster setup - d4 hit die, average Base Attack Bonus progression, meh Fortitude and Reflex save progression, and good WIll save progression - so it's all in the class features here. These include an imp familiar, the ability to share spell usage with other witches nearby, a telepathic link with other members of their coven, a fear aura, slowed aging, and a bonus to Armor Class when wearing black clothing. No, that last statement isn't a joke.




Prestige Classes
Rather than noting what prestige classes from the D&D core rules are removed as with core classes, the chapter on prestige classes starts by saying what D&D prestige classes stay. The Arcane Trickster prestige class exists for magical spies, the Archmage reflects professors emeritus in arcane studies at Uropan universities, Blackguard is for damned warriors that have signed pacts with demon, Hierophants are particularly powerful Catholic bishops or pagan priests, Horizon Walkers are extreme wilderness experts, the Shadowdancer exists but is limited to female Witchlings only, Thaumaturgists are forbidden occultists due to planar summoning being a forbidden art, and then Assassin and Loremaster exist doing exactly what role they always do. There are also, of course, new prestige classes.


Falstaff: Definitely one of the weirder prestige classes I've seen, the Faltstaff is a prestige class dedicated to making your character a fat oaf. Not only do they automatically become 30% heavier upon the first level of the class, but also have class features that include a bonus to attack rolls when they are eating or drinking while they fight, a collection of first level Commoners as an entourage, and the ability to deal collateral damage with a melee or ranged attack a number of times per day that increases the less Dexterity the character has. Similarly, while most of the prestige class's numbers are pretty average, with d6 hit die, average progression for Base Attack Bonus and Reflex saves, and good Fortitude save progression,the class actually gives you a penalty to Will saves that increases the more levels you have in the class. It would certainly be an interesting character to play, to say the least.


Fencing Master: A more typical prestige class, basically being an alternate path for Rakes to take that focuses on raw sword damage output instead of more trick moves. It pretty much shares most of the Rake's numbers crunched down to prestige class levels.


Firebrand: This is a bit of a difficult prestige class to get into, as it has alignment restrictions (must be Chaotic Good, Chaotic Evil, Lawful Good, or Lawful Evil - no neutrality), regular feat requirements like most prestige classes, and the character has to have at least 100 followers as judged by the DM. And what do you get for that? Well, not a lot, really. All three save progressions are poor, skill points are almost nonexistent, hit die are d10s, and its class features all focus on getting more NPCs or giving miniscule buffs to the ones you already have. About the only thing the Firebrand has going for it is a full Base Attack Bonus progression. Not exactly all that inspiring for a zealous hero archetype.


Frontier Legend: You are indeed a king or queen of the wild frontier with this prestige class, being able to form bonds with the animals, never get lost, need very little food and water to survive, and generally being a survivalist expert. The numbers aren't too bad either, with a piss poor Will save progression being made up for by a good Fortitude progression and full Base Attack Bonus progression, as well as those nice d10 hit die.


Officer: The Firebrand, only better: no alignment restriction, good Fortitude save progression, fortification against ranged attacks, and a one in four chance to negate critical hits or sneak attacks.


Sea Captain: The Officer, but with ship boosting instead of ally boosting.


Sower: Johnny Appleseed the prestige class. You can transfer divine spells you know into magic apples for others to consume and plant a number of magical trees with various effects such as increased healing for those near it or an aura of emotion-calming. An average Base Attack Bonus progression and d6 hit die is made up for by good Fortitude and Will saves, not to mention the whole magic trees bit.


Tall Tale Hero: A class for First Nations legendary heroes, Paul Bunyan types, and the like. With d12 hit die, full Base Attack Bonus progression, good Fortitude save progression, they are burly and strong individuals even without class features. The class features, though, just make it even better. Size category increase, large bonuses against foes made of either stone or wood, the ability to heal hit points more rapidly by having a huge meal followed immediately by sleep, and a giant version of a domestic animal such as an ox, mule, or dog as an animal companion.


Wild Brawler: You get d12 hit die, full Base Attack Bonus progression, and can punch stuff really hard. What more could you want?

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Next update: Skills, feats, and new fighting rules.

Traveller
Jan 6, 2012

WHIM AND FOPPERY



Plague of Hats posted:

Hey so I made a site to put F&F reviews on both in case of thread archiving, to make them a bit easier to read (site formatting aside) and to allow them to be read despite the paywall. It is currently sparse, but I can copy-paste with the best of them. I am interested in getting permission from reviewers, though I can also abandon all my heroic work in the face of stern disapproval. Suggestions and pointers on how to make things look better or more readable are also a plus.

Sure thing, you can copy my stuff. I hope you can keep up with the archiving!

Also, would people be interested in a FnF of: Burning Empires (in the grim darkness of the far future, there are only bodysnatching worms and food logistics), Bellfahle Magic Academy (jRPG, looks cute) or Almogavers (Catalan , no seriously this thing is in loving Catalan)?

Robindaybird
Aug 21, 2007

Neat. Sweet. Petite.



Traveller posted:

or Almogavers (Catalan , no seriously this thing is in loving Catalan)?

I'm always interested in foreign tabletop games.

goatface
Dec 5, 2007

I had a video of that when I was about 6.

I remember it being shit.




Grimey Drawer

Bodysnatching worms and food logistics sounds interesting, but if the Catalan one is particularly Catalan, then that one.

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Mr. Maltose
Feb 16, 2011

The Guffless Girlverine


There's a game about Almogavars? Get on that poo poo, let's punch dudes for Aragon and God!

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