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No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


Chef De Cuisinart posted:

http://www.amazon.com/San-Jamar-CBG...words=san+jamar

Under 20bux, and I use these daily at work, so I can attest to the high quality.
When I worked in a kitchen, some people had these neat rubber rings that they'd put under the cutting boards so that they wouldn't slip. Felt nicer than having to wet a paper towel every time. Anyone know these/where I can get them?

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GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



No Wave posted:

When I worked in a kitchen, some people had these neat rubber rings that they'd put under the cutting boards so that they wouldn't slip. Felt nicer than having to wet a paper towel every time. Anyone know these/where I can get them?

is this it? http://www.amazon.com/San-Jamar-CBM...e/dp/B0001MSCKM

I usually use a moist papertowel but this looks pretty good I might get it.

also, lol @ the 2 star review

Steve Yun
Aug 7, 2003

I
ANALYZE
CARTOONS


Grimey Drawer

Couldn't a silicone baking mat do the same job?

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


GrAviTy84 posted:

is this it? http://www.amazon.com/San-Jamar-CBM...e/dp/B0001MSCKM

I usually use a moist papertowel but this looks pretty good I might get it.

also, lol @ the 2 star review
They were actually literally orange o-shaped rings, probably three inches in diameter. I'm assuming they were french in origin and are probably one of those weird things that are widely available there but not at all here.

These would actually probably do the job very nicely:
http://www.williams-sonoma.com/prod...nt-rubber-ring/

Though slightly wider circles would work better for me.

EDIT: Found it! Searched "canning", and indeed, made in France.
http://www.surlatable.com/product/P...1701&origin=pla

Basically, put one on each corner of your cutting board and you're good. Though you can get by with 3.

No Wave fucked around with this message at Jul 11, 2013 around 01:12

Chef De Cuisinart
Oct 31, 2010

Brandy does in fact, in my experience, contribute to Getting Down.

The san jamar board I linked earlier has rubber feet on the bottom to stop slipping, and it comes in like a million colors.

coffeetable
Feb 5, 2006


GrAviTy84 posted:

note on "Damascus" steel. No one really knows how to make true Damascus steel anymore. The secret has been lost. Sorry. Most Damascus steel you see either out of Seki City or out of the European copies are just etched stainless steel. It is no doubt pretty, but know that it is not the real thing. This is coming from someone who has a Damascus clad VG-10 gyuto, so, yeah, I'm not just shittalking. This includes Shun kai knives.

I don't know much about knives, but I do know a lil' bout metallurgy and this isn't really true. Yes, the exact process for creating Damascus steel has been lost, but we still know roughly how it was done. Thing is, there's no point in replicating those techniques any more because frankly our source steel is no longer a heap of crap.

See, back in the olden days before things like mass spectrometry and atomic theory, smiths used whatever chunks of iron ore they could get their hands on. Natural ore though is highly variable in the impurities it contains though, and if you just take the raw steel from it and beat it out into a length, the quality of the metal will vary wildy (by modern standards) along the length. Result is that there are weak points, which are Bad News. Smiths compensated for this by folding the metal. You'd take a chunk of steel and beat it out into a bar, then gather several of these bars together and beat the whole group flat. Then you'd fold the resulting amalgamation onto itself, and beat it flat again. By doing this many times you distribute any impurities throughout the steel, so you end up with lump of metal that is of the same quality throughout.

This is called pattern welding (or laminating depending on exactly what you're doing), which the Damascus process is a type of (and produced particularly good contrasts in the layers). If you then abrade away the surface of the lump, you reveal the layers that were created by the folding, and that gives you all the pretty lines. If you're interested in aesthetics, you can use techniques like acid etching to pick out these layers. With modern steel though, there's no real point in this folding process unless you want show off. The stuff that comes out of an industrial foundry is unbelievably homogeneous already, and a blade that's just stamped out of a sheet of it and ground down will be just as good as one made out of hundred-folded steel. Won't be as pretty though

NB: This is also why people who obsess over katanas and all that crap are idiots. Japanese swordmaking took so long because it required many more folds than their European equivalents, and they needed many more folds because their source iron was poo poo.

Steve Yun
Aug 7, 2003

I
ANALYZE
CARTOONS


Grimey Drawer

No Wave posted:

They were actually literally orange o-shaped rings, probably three inches in diameter. I'm assuming they were french in origin and are probably one of those weird things that are widely available there but not at all here.

These would actually probably do the job very nicely:
http://www.williams-sonoma.com/prod...nt-rubber-ring/

Though slightly wider circles would work better for me.

EDIT: Found it! Searched "canning", and indeed, made in France.
http://www.surlatable.com/product/P...1701&origin=pla

Basically, put one on each corner of your cutting board and you're good. Though you can get by with 3.

Haha, jar gaskets?

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


Steve Yun posted:

Haha, jar gaskets?


Yeah. For some reason it's one of those things you never put together when you see it out of context for six months straight.

Anyways, I can strongly recommend these as temporary feet for any slippy cutting board. If this is my contribution to internet cooking, I will be forever proud.

I ended up going with this model:
http://www.amazon.com/Bormioli-Rocc...rds=fido+gasket

I'll let you know how it goes.

porcellus
Oct 27, 2004
oh wait, wrong chat window

Steve Yun posted:

Couldn't a silicone baking mat do the same job?

I've never thought of that one, that's pretty good one. The usual stuff around here are drawer liners, neoprene yoga mats, sleeping camp mats, close cell foam sheets..

Steve Yun
Aug 7, 2003

I
ANALYZE
CARTOONS


Grimey Drawer

Just be aware, silicone baking mats are reinforced with fiberglass, and you don't want any of that exposed from an accidental knife cut and getting into your food or skin.

ma i married a tuna
Apr 24, 2005


Fo3 posted:

Suprising to read the angle marks are way off, I thought that was just an issue with the cheap chinense ebay ones.
Oh well, even more reason to buy the faker and use the savings to buy an angle cube I guess.


Yeah, one thing worth buying is a digital protractor like the igaging 'anglecube'
The edgepro/faux is marked with the top blue mark as 35 deg(I think, could be 30 or 40 deg) for pocket knives, 2nd mark down in yellow as 20 deg for kitchen knives, next mark down is green (15 or 18 deg?), last mark down in red (15 or 10 deg?). All I remember is the yellow 20 deg as that's all I cared about initially and I can't find the manual right now.

Using the angle cube, 18 deg is actually mid way between the green and red.
I got the angle cube from this guy on ebay: http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/140636422546
seller/username thetaylormk if you want to look them up on ebay USA.

Edit: Now I re-read what I posted, you guys might be able to get the 'Angle Cube' cheaper or with free postage from Amazon. I had to go with the seller I mentioned from ebay because the Amazon seller of the "Angle Cube" wouldn't ship to Australia.

I just used an app on my phone.

Invisible Ted
Aug 24, 2011

hhhehehe


No Wave posted:

When I worked in a kitchen, some people had these neat rubber rings that they'd put under the cutting boards so that they wouldn't slip. Felt nicer than having to wet a paper towel every time. Anyone know these/where I can get them?

I literally found a roll of non-slip rubber padding at the dollar store one day, I think it's supposed to go in cabinets for dishes and whatnot. Works amazingly well for my cutting board, better than a wet towel any day.

crackhaed
Jan 18, 2005

From out of the basement,
a man doth emerge,
sweat on his brow,
for Efron the urge.


Invisible Ted posted:

I literally found a roll of non-slip rubber padding at the dollar store one day, I think it's supposed to go in cabinets for dishes and whatnot. Works amazingly well for my cutting board, better than a wet towel any day.

This makes way too much sense and is overly cost effective. I'm afraid we're going to stick to using c-folds.

Fo3
Feb 14, 2004
Interested party

ma i married a tuna posted:

I just used an app on my phone.

Just for comparison does your phone app say about the same? Does it read 18deg to be about midway between the green and red markers?
My phone is a 8250, it has no apps.

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


Fo3 posted:

Just for comparison does your phone app say about the same? Does it read 18deg to be about midway between the green and red markers?
My phone is a 8250, it has no apps.

Accelerometers are innacurate as poo poo:
http://www.popularmechanics.com/tec...s/tools/4308358

walruscat
Apr 27, 2013



I have this knife that has been abused and never maintained for 5 years. My wife chipped the tip off and the edge is chipped all over the place. There's hardly an edge to speak of.





Is this something I can get taken care of by buying my own sharpening equipment or am I better off taking it to a professional to give it some physical therapy?

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



walruscat posted:

I have this knife that has been abused and never maintained for 5 years. My wife chipped the tip off and the edge is chipped all over the place. There's hardly an edge to speak of.





Is this something I can get taken care of by buying my own sharpening equipment or am I better off taking it to a professional to give it some physical therapy?

it's a santoku so there probably wasn't much of a usable tip to begin with ( </personalbias> ). Personally I wouldn't even bother with trying to get a needle tip but I would put a razor edge on the rest of the knife (I'm assuming you have a petty or paring knife with a better tip for accurate whateveruse anyway). Those nicks on the blade aren't too bad and are pretty normal considering 5 years of use. If you wanted to do it yourself, one stone at about 600 grit would make evening out the nicks very fast. One stone at about 1.2-2k will smooth out the edge pretty nicely and give you a perfectly usable knife. Stropping with balsa and 1 micron compound will give you a fantastically sharp knife. You can fill in any gaps (some people will add a 6-8k stone in there, too but that's kinda gilding the lily) and if you are willing to work with it you can probably get by with just a 1.2k but evening out the nicks will take longer.

Or take it in and have it sharpened, it should cost like 5bux maybe.

ma i married a tuna
Apr 24, 2005


Fo3 posted:

Just for comparison does your phone app say about the same? Does it read 18deg to be about midway between the green and red markers?
My phone is a 8250, it has no apps.

I set mine for 20 degrees, which about halfway between the lowest and second-lowest notch. My chinese knockoff didn't offer the luxury option of color coding.


What that article says is that they're useless as a level, since they need to be calibrated. Once I calibrate to the base and set that as zero - whether it's truly level or not - my phone very accurately tell me the difference in degrees between base and arm. So, perfectly useful for this purpose.

The Midniter
Jul 9, 2001



I found this local guy who does house call knife sharpening and I'm considering giving him a ring. However, one thing has be a bit concerned, mostly because I know nothing about sharpening:

http://www.afineredge.com/questions.html

Check question 15 (and the associated MS Paint diagram several questions up that should correspond with this question). Is that okay, or even normal at all? I'm not quite sure I understand the distinction.

Part of my desire to patronize his services is due to my unironic appreciation of how terrible his website is formatted. In this day and age it takes some serious skill to have a site look that lovely.

Also, read the "My Book" section at the bottom of the left sidebar. It is amazing.

Chef De Cuisinart
Oct 31, 2010

Brandy does in fact, in my experience, contribute to Getting Down.

Yes, it's normal. What he's doing is thinning the edge.

e: although his diagram is dumb, it should look more like this:

Chef De Cuisinart fucked around with this message at Jul 12, 2013 around 15:14

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



What's the likelihood that someone has tried this knife before: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Masamori-Ma...=item41704f1187

Seems way too good too be true to me. Shirogami sujihiki for 64bux? :/

I know that ebay Japanese knives are generally unbranded OEM knives that get sold to other vendors to make up some of their product line (the Gekko -> JCK, Togiharu, etc is an example) but this looks like no other knife I've seen from any other manufacturer. It's probably SK4 or something labelled as shiro.

deimos
Nov 30, 2006

Forget it man this bat is whack, it's got poobrain!


GrAviTy84 posted:

What's the likelihood that someone has tried this knife before: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Masamori-Ma...=item41704f1187

Seems way too good too be true to me. Shirogami sujihiki for 64bux? :/

I know that ebay Japanese knives are generally unbranded OEM knives that get sold to other vendors to make up some of their product line (the Gekko -> JCK, Togiharu, etc is an example) but this looks like no other knife I've seen from any other manufacturer. It's probably SK4 or something labelled as shiro.

The guy seems to have a crapload of positive reviews, and the way he labels his items I doubt he gets anything but people that might recognise the japanese knife names and would probably understand what qualifies as a good purchase when they get it. I am very tempted to bite for .

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



So a bit of internetting and I guess that Masamori and Naozumi are both OEM companies. Some listings are much more specific in their steel listing: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Japanese-su...item414a8f987d, for instance, which lists the steel as Yasuki white carbon steel. No number designation but Yasuki (if true) implies that it is for sure a Hitachi steel.

Some other forums were saying things like "it needs to be thinned a lot" which I guess isn't that big of a deal considering a lot of sub 200bux knives can use a deal of thinning. They were also saying that it is actually quite hard, the steel, and takes a long time to thin, which could be a +1 in the camp of it actually being shirogami.

walruscat
Apr 27, 2013



GrAviTy84 posted:

it's a santoku so there probably wasn't much of a usable tip to begin with ( </personalbias> ). Personally I wouldn't even bother with trying to get a needle tip but I would put a razor edge on the rest of the knife (I'm assuming you have a petty or paring knife with a better tip for accurate whateveruse anyway). Those nicks on the blade aren't too bad and are pretty normal considering 5 years of use. If you wanted to do it yourself, one stone at about 600 grit would make evening out the nicks very fast. One stone at about 1.2-2k will smooth out the edge pretty nicely and give you a perfectly usable knife. Stropping with balsa and 1 micron compound will give you a fantastically sharp knife. You can fill in any gaps (some people will add a 6-8k stone in there, too but that's kinda gilding the lily) and if you are willing to work with it you can probably get by with just a 1.2k but evening out the nicks will take longer.

Or take it in and have it sharpened, it should cost like 5bux maybe.

Thanks. I'll just pay for a quick sharpening since I don't know how to use most of what you described, and then I'll learn how to properly maintain my knives from now on.

Hauki
May 11, 2010



Custom moritaka yanagiba ordered.

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



Hauki posted:

Custom moritaka yanagiba ordered.

Why do you post this and not be on IRC to talk about it?

Hauki
May 11, 2010



GrAviTy84 posted:

Why do you post this and not be on IRC to talk about it?
Because I'm at work posting from my phone (also ordering knives apparently).

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



Hauki posted:

Because I'm at work posting from my phone (also ordering knives apparently).

How long? Ao super? Anything particular or did you just ask for a yanagi of X length?

I was thinking about it more last night and I have almost convinced myself into giving a (single bevel) yanagi such as the Tojiro Shirogami a try as a slicer.

Hauki
May 11, 2010



GrAviTy84 posted:

How long? Ao super? Anything particular or did you just ask for a yanagi of X length?

I was thinking about it more last night and I have almost convinced myself into giving a (single bevel) yanagi such as the Tojiro Shirogami a try as a slicer.
I pretty much just asked for a yanagi x length.
Debated doing 300mm, but finally settled for 270mm. I'd like to try a single bevel too, but I'm gonna try this for now in his standard 50/50. Yeah, Ao super. Quoted me 16k yen, which seems massively reasonable. That puts it squarely in the same range as the Kikuichi we were looking at, one week turnaround not including shipping time. I still have a bit of time if I decide to change stuff though.

Chef De Cuisinart
Oct 31, 2010

Brandy does in fact, in my experience, contribute to Getting Down.

16k yen, that's like $160? Not a bad price at all.

Hauki
May 11, 2010



Chef De Cuisinart posted:

16k yen, that's like $160? Not a bad price at all.
Not bad at all. Also, it arrived yesterday, so way faster turnaround than I expected. Will edit in pictures later but it looks preeetty sweet.
Sort of wishing I had sprung for another 30mm already though.

Edit: holy poo poo, I just realized it took less than a week from ordering to have the blade made and shipped around the world.

Hauki fucked around with this message at Jul 22, 2013 around 02:14

adorai
Nov 2, 2002

10/27/04 Never forget

Grimey Drawer

Last year I bought the cheapest ceramic knife they had at bed bath & beyond (I think it was $20 or so on sale). I do not regret my decision. I use it only for cutting vegetables, and with no care other than a quick rinse under the faucet after use, it still slices through tomatoes, lettuce, and onions with zero effort. I have never used it on anything resembling meat, and it has not chipped. I still have my nice chef's knife that I use for real chopping, but for the more delicate things I cut I love the ceramic knife.

Stalizard
Aug 11, 2006

Have I got a headache!

adorai posted:

Last year I bought the cheapest ceramic knife they had at bed bath & beyond (I think it was $20 or so on sale). I do not regret my decision. I use it only for cutting vegetables, and with no care other than a quick rinse under the faucet after use, it still slices through tomatoes, lettuce, and onions with zero effort. I have never used it on anything resembling meat, and it has not chipped. I still have my nice chef's knife that I use for real chopping, but for the more delicate things I cut I love the ceramic knife.

Enjoy it until you accidentally use it on a brick of grocery store cheese, and the blade separates from the handle entirely. After that, I recommend a proper metal knife.

BrosephofArimathea
Jan 31, 2005

I've finally come to grips with the fact that the sky fucking fell.

Postman brought gifts today. Traditional Australian game of Knifey-Spoony:

a - not a knife


b - is a knife

BrosephofArimathea fucked around with this message at Jul 22, 2013 around 08:26

Chef De Cuisinart
Oct 31, 2010

Brandy does in fact, in my experience, contribute to Getting Down.

Cleavers shouldn't have handles. It should just be like a razor sharp bench knife.

Fo3
Feb 14, 2004
Interested party

I have no idea what that cleaver is or who makes it and why.

CDC confused the hell out of me when they said "bench knife" at first I thought "like what, some type of mezzaluna?" Correct me if I'm wrong though CDC.

Fo3 fucked around with this message at Jul 22, 2013 around 13:03

Invisible Ted
Aug 24, 2011

hhhehehe


Fo3 posted:

I have no idea what that cleaver is or who makes it and why.

CDC confused the hell out of me when they said "bench knife" at first I thought "like what, some type of mezzaluna?" Correct me if I'm wrong though CDC.

A bench knife is for scraping your work surface when baking, among other things.

BrosephofArimathea
Jan 31, 2005

I've finally come to grips with the fact that the sky fucking fell.

Fo3 posted:

I have no idea what that cleaver is or who makes it and why.

Heavyass butchers cleaver, CCK, breaking down joints/cutting bones/sectioning Brontosaurus.

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



doop doop I got a new thing:


moritaka aogami super 240mm gyuto by gtrwndr87, on Flickr

Picked up No Wave's Moritaka. I'm shocked at how light this thing is, it's kind of ridiculous, but I love it. Haven't had any time using it yet, it could use a bit of time on a waterstone though so I might do that first.

GrAviTy84 fucked around with this message at Jul 26, 2013 around 22:46

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adorai
Nov 2, 2002

10/27/04 Never forget

Grimey Drawer

Stalizard posted:

Enjoy it until you accidentally use it on a brick of grocery store cheese, and the blade separates from the handle entirely. After that, I recommend a proper metal knife.

Like I said, I only use it on vegetables. It's very distinctive in comparison to my Chefs knife. If this one broke, I would go buy another. I used to hate slicing tomatoes, because I would have to hone my blade every time basically to get a nice thinly sliced tomato. Now I know I can cut my 1/16th" tomato slice every time with the knife straight out of the drawer.

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