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Sirotan
Oct 17, 2006

Sirotan is a seal.


Ham Wrangler

Verdugo posted:

I was working on a laptop and they put the key sticker UNDER the battery in the battery compartment -- talk about the most unintuitive place to put a COA. It was an HP Envy.

That's every Dell laptop for the past year+.

But I will say the first time I saw one like that, it did befuddle for me a bit.

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n0tqu1tesane
May 7, 2003

She was rubbing her ass all over my hands. They don't just do that for everyone.

Grimey Drawer

At least under the battery they're less likely to rub off and become unreadable after a year or so.

Paladine_PSoT
Jan 2, 2010

If you have a problem Yo, I'll solve it



n0tqu1tesane posted:

At least under the battery they're less likely to rub off and become unreadable after a year or so.

Unless they're thermal ink...

Galler
Jan 27, 2008



Sickening posted:

I am pretty sure every college has someone you can talk to that will confirm your degree without the need to disclose your entire transcript.

My university farmed this off to a third party that apparently only discloses the student's start date and end date. No information about graduation or anything just the start date of the first semester you enrolled for and the end date of the last semester you enrolled for.

Background check company called me up all confused because the third party records people could only tell them that I started attending the university in 2007 and 'finished' attending December of 2013 (aka the end of the current semester which isn't my last semester). I got my BS in 2008 and went back for a graduate degree in 2011 which I think is important information for someone doing a background check but I guess my university went with the lowest bidder on that one.

IamJacksAlcoholism
Apr 29, 2013

Liquor ipsum dolor sit amet golden dream stolichnaya; jose cuervo ballantine, brandy manhattan! General sherman ramos gin fizz blue hawaii. Glendronach myers grog pisco sour ketel one kamikaze bananarita oban glen keith dufftown. Negroni montgomery, murphy's cuba libre rum swizzle. Vodka martini

QPZIL posted:

... there's no product key listed on the back of the laptop.

edit-- god drat it I just discovered that Windows 8 OEM keys are embedded in the BIOS so all I have to do is install 8 Standard and it'll auto-detect. I'm a dummy.

Yup. Windows 8 moves to BIOS-based product keys

quote:

The OEM license is actually non-transferable to another PC. When you buy a PC preinstalled with Windows, that version of Windows is only licensed for that PC and cannot be transferred to a new PC. The transfer of the license must accompany the PC it was licensed for. If the customer were able to get that machine fixed, they would simply need to call customer support to re-activate if there were changes big enough to merit PC reset or system recovery unusable.

If you ever want to try to understand Microsoft's licensing scheme, be prepared for some shady poo poo and make sure your health insurance has a good mental health program, because it WILL drive you crazy. Here's my favorite example: If you use 3rd party software to provide graphical interactive sessions (such as XenDesktop) and don't even enable Remote Desktop Services on the server, you still have to purchase RDS CALs for each user or device that accesses that 3rd party service. So, even though you aren't using Microsoft's product, they still want their pound of flesh.

TWBalls
Apr 16, 2003
My medication never lies

Paladine_PSoT posted:

Unless they're thermal ink...

If it is, it's held up remarkably well on my Latitude E6400 that I've had for the past 4 years. Much better than any of the old D520's we had, which were on the little cover for the memory modules.

SEKCobra
Feb 28, 2011


Verdugo posted:

I was working on a laptop and they put the key sticker UNDER the battery in the battery compartment -- talk about the most unintuitive place to put a COA. It was an HP Envy.

I checked there before I remembered that they didn't put anything about Windows 8 on the laptops anymore.

ookiimarukochan
Apr 4, 2011

DON'T BE A CUNT AND I PROBABLY WON'T LAUGH AT YOU WHEN YOU GET RAPED.

PROBABLY.


fivre posted:

My first job asked me for my SAT scores.
In the UK I've seen more than one mid-level / senior dev job (5~10 years experience, minimum) where they make demands on your GCSE and A-Level grades (exams you take at ~16 and ~18), often ignoring the fact that the system has changed several times in the past 10 years, so their applicants won't be able to provide the sort of grades / number of results they want. Asking for any sort of pre-degree qualifications for a non entry level job is one of the biggest warning signs there is, IMO.

hihifellow
Jun 17, 2005

seriously where the fuck did this genre come from


College Slice

Brought my boss almost to tears when I let her know that how bad she thought my one co-worker was and how bad he really is at his job is a lot different. All this because he copped an attitude over the fact I took care of two tickets for a group he'd been badly handling, which I then took to my boss on the recommendation from a few people I showed the angry texts to (don't get pissy with your coworkers over texts, especially when people are already tired of fixing your mistakes, seriously). Now she doesn't know what to do, the guy is so bad at his job it would take a gargantuan amount of classes and training to get him merely competent (though how do you teach a basic skill like "setting up a printer on the wireless network without hand holding") and she doesn't want to fire him, as outside of a few events like this he's a nice guy who gets along with everyone, even the worst of the users, and it would pretty much wreck him financially.

This is going to get really, really ugly before it gets any better.

ratbert90
Feb 12, 2009
JUST FUCKING STOP, JESUS H. CHRIST


hihifellow posted:

Brought my boss almost to tears when I let her know that how bad she thought my one co-worker was and how bad he really is at his job is a lot different. All this because he copped an attitude over the fact I took care of two tickets for a group he'd been badly handling, which I then took to my boss on the recommendation from a few people I showed the angry texts to (don't get pissy with your coworkers over texts, especially when people are already tired of fixing your mistakes, seriously). Now she doesn't know what to do, the guy is so bad at his job it would take a gargantuan amount of classes and training to get him merely competent (though how do you teach a basic skill like "setting up a printer on the wireless network without hand holding") and she doesn't want to fire him, as outside of a few events like this he's a nice guy who gets along with everyone, even the worst of the users, and it would pretty much wreck him financially.

This is going to get really, really ugly before it gets any better.

This shouldn't be a issue. Give him a few weeks notice and let him go. The company comes first.

rolleyes
Nov 16, 2006

Sometimes you have to roll the hard... two?

This is management being spineless again. It is not your company's responsibility to train this guy to do the job he claimed to be qualified for, nor is it their place to act as social security for him.

There are a couple of points which could avert a firing:
- Has your boss actually brought up his poor performance with him and set out an improvement plan for him with targets to meet? If not then this should definitely be done first.
- Is there any training or qualifications he could get (outside of work time and on his own dime) which might improve matters?
- Can he be reassigned to another position?


If none of that is a help then there's not really much choice. It's not nice having to fire someone and it's worse when you know it will cause them hardship, but sometimes it still has to be done.

I'd also suggest your boss has a look at your hiring process to see why he managed to get through it, as from your description it sounds like he's almost comically bad. If she wants to avoid having to fire under-performers then the easiest way to achieve that is to not hire them in the first place.

mewse
May 2, 2006



I got really upset at my last job when my boss didn't listen to me when I told him that the programmer we hired was basically incompetent. Instead of letting the guy go during the probationary period, he ended up cutting him loose like a year later, I did a "told you so" and my boss said "you should've been more vocal". I quit that job a few months later

hihifellow
Jun 17, 2005

seriously where the fuck did this genre come from


College Slice

rolleyes posted:

This is management being spineless again. It is not your company's responsibility to train this guy to do the job he claimed to be qualified for, nor is it their place to act as social security for him.

There are a couple of points which could avert a firing:
- Has your boss actually brought up his poor performance with him and set out an improvement plan for him with targets to meet? If not then this should definitely be done first.
- Is there any training or qualifications he could get (outside of work time and on his own dime) which might improve matters?
- Can he be reassigned to another position?


If none of that is a help then there's not really much choice. It's not nice having to fire someone and it's worse when you know it will cause them hardship, but sometimes it still has to be done.

I'd also suggest your boss has a look at your hiring process to see why he managed to get through it, as from your description it sounds like he's almost comically bad. If she wants to avoid having to fire under-performers then the easiest way to achieve that is to not hire them in the first place.

The biggest problem is we don't know where to start on improvement; I'm no help since I'm one of those "always been good at computers" nerds and he hasn't shown any ability to learn on the job. The only thing that comes to mind is something similar to a "computer/network technician" associates that the local community college offers, but that's two years of full time classes and he needs to get up to speed a lot faster than that.

I'm going to bring up transferring him to another department on Monday, though I'm not sure how well it'll go over; part of the problem is we're very tight on staff and pulling someone out of our ticket queue, even if they mess up half of them, is a blow.

And she hates the job description we got hired under, but she only inherited our department about 7 months ago along with our problem worker, and has yet to actually hire anyone else (budget concerns; last years was not good though our partner org easily covered it)

ratbert90
Feb 12, 2009
JUST FUCKING STOP, JESUS H. CHRIST


hihifellow posted:

The biggest problem is we don't know where to start on improvement; I'm no help since I'm one of those "always been good at computers" nerds and he hasn't shown any ability to learn on the job. The only thing that comes to mind is something similar to a "computer/network technician" associates that the local community college offers, but that's two years of full time classes and he needs to get up to speed a lot faster than that.

I'm going to bring up transferring him to another department on Monday, though I'm not sure how well it'll go over; part of the problem is we're very tight on staff and pulling someone out of our ticket queue, even if they mess up half of them, is a blow.

And she hates the job description we got hired under, but she only inherited our department about 7 months ago along with our problem worker, and has yet to actually hire anyone else (budget concerns; last years was not good though our partner org easily covered it)

Some people have aptitude towards technology, some don't. If he is truly that bad, your company needs to transfer him or fire him.

rolleyes
Nov 16, 2006

Sometimes you have to roll the hard... two?

hihifellow posted:

I'm going to bring up transferring him to another department on Monday, though I'm not sure how well it'll go over; part of the problem is we're very tight on staff and pulling someone out of our ticket queue, even if they mess up half of them, is a blow.

Obviously you know better than I do, but if he's really that bad then the blow might not be as bad as you think when you consider the delays and re-work he's causing you.

guppy
Sep 21, 2004

sting like a byob

hihifellow posted:

Brought my boss almost to tears when I let her know that how bad she thought my one co-worker was and how bad he really is at his job is a lot different. All this because he copped an attitude over the fact I took care of two tickets for a group he'd been badly handling, which I then took to my boss on the recommendation from a few people I showed the angry texts to (don't get pissy with your coworkers over texts, especially when people are already tired of fixing your mistakes, seriously). Now she doesn't know what to do, the guy is so bad at his job it would take a gargantuan amount of classes and training to get him merely competent (though how do you teach a basic skill like "setting up a printer on the wireless network without hand holding") and she doesn't want to fire him, as outside of a few events like this he's a nice guy who gets along with everyone, even the worst of the users, and it would pretty much wreck him financially.

This is going to get really, really ugly before it gets any better.

How bad are we talking here?

hihifellow
Jun 17, 2005

seriously where the fuck did this genre come from


College Slice

That's difficult to quantify since I've got enough work to do that I stopped babysitting him a long time ago, so I only know when other people either complain about him or I get stuck fixing his mistakes. The most recent one I know of is the potential loss of patient data after he re-imaged a computer without backing up anything on the local HDD. The department that uses this computer was re-staffed about 4 weeks ago and from what I heard orientation and training was non-existent; managerial problem there, the new group basically got handed the work of the old group and told to have at it. Nobody even knew they had network drives until about 3 days ago, so lots of locally saved data. So all he did was ask the new manager if any files were saved locally and went ahead and re-imaged it after she said no.

The computer is back in the IT department on our bench, powered off, until I can get to it on Monday and start looking at restoring the data. Depending on what was lost, legal might get involved as any loss of patient data gets filed as an incident, which goes straight to our lawyer and the bigwigs of medical.

Vulture Culture
Jul 14, 2003

I was never enjoying it. I only eat it for the nutrients.


rolleyes posted:

This is management being spineless again. It is not your company's responsibility to train this guy to do the job he claimed to be qualified for, nor is it their place to act as social security for him.
I agree a little bit, but not completely. I wouldn't be happy if someone quit overnight without giving me a warning that they were unhappy with their job first. I would try not to go the other way around either. At the very least I'd offer a severance and an offer to help the employee try to find another job, especially if they were nice people who just turned out not to be a very good fit for the organization/role. If they're downright lazy or they're abusive towards coworkers or the company, they get whatever they get.

rolleyes posted:

There are a couple of points which could avert a firing:
- Has your boss actually brought up his poor performance with him and set out an improvement plan for him with targets to meet? If not then this should definitely be done first.
I almost unilaterally disagree with the notion of a "performance improvement plan" or whatever else Sloan-style management programs teach. All the prevailing research in the field has shown time and time again that job satisfaction and individual motivation are tied more to feelings of autonomy and being able to make a difference. If these aren't the problem, then the issues aren't with the individual, and we shouldn't act as though they are. One of the following is more likely:

  • The employee never had appropriate goals set for them in the first place, which makes the performance problem their manager's, not theirs. Look closely at the goals they already had and whether they're appropriate before trying to set new ones.
  • The employee doesn't have the skills necessary to cut the mustard in the position. Ask if this is because someone is unwilling to cross-train them (hostile work environments ahoy!), because the company or team itself does not adequately foster organizational learning, or if there are serious problems in the hiring process that allowed someone unqualified to make it through the interview process.
  • The employee is not a fit for the culture of the organization. If you can't make that work, part ways as amicably as you can.

A performance improvement plan is like saying, "yeah, I think they're just lazy, but I want to see if they can stop being lazy if they know they're being watched really closely." It's just a really counterproductive thing to do, and unless you've already made a significant investment in the employee and their relationship with the company, I don't think it makes sense to tie up a bunch of management's time measuring something that won't actually correlate to the employee's performance when they aren't being micromanaged and scrutinized.

rolleyes posted:

- Is there any training or qualifications he could get (outside of work time and on his own dime) which might improve matters?
Making someone's continued employment contingent on them spending their own time and money outside of work may get the company in serious trouble if a lawsuit ever arises from the situation. Don't do this. If you even suggest this, sure as poo poo don't do it in a system of record like an email or employee review.

rolleyes posted:

- Can he be reassigned to another position?
There's only two times that this is ever really a help. The first is if the person was hired into the wrong position in the first place, and they know it, and you know it. This will make things easier all around. The other circumstance is if an employee contract or regulatory requirement makes it very difficult to outright terminate the employee. If you do this for the second reason, be aware that you aren't disarming a bomb; you're having someone else in your company jump on a grenade.

rolleyes posted:

If none of that is a help then there's not really much choice. It's not nice having to fire someone and it's worse when you know it will cause them hardship, but sometimes it still has to be done.

I'd also suggest your boss has a look at your hiring process to see why he managed to get through it, as from your description it sounds like he's almost comically bad. If she wants to avoid having to fire under-performers then the easiest way to achieve that is to not hire them in the first place.
People tend to appreciate honesty. If a manager is having such serious problems with a subordinate that this approach is even being considered, there should be discussions opened where all that is laid out on the table. The employee should be asked directly if they think another company would be a better fit. If management knows another organization where they might work better, they should try to make an introduction and have the parting be on good terms rather than awful ones.

Vulture Culture
Jul 14, 2003

I was never enjoying it. I only eat it for the nutrients.


hihifellow posted:

That's difficult to quantify since I've got enough work to do that I stopped babysitting him a long time ago, so I only know when other people either complain about him or I get stuck fixing his mistakes. The most recent one I know of is the potential loss of patient data after he re-imaged a computer without backing up anything on the local HDD. The department that uses this computer was re-staffed about 4 weeks ago and from what I heard orientation and training was non-existent; managerial problem there, the new group basically got handed the work of the old group and told to have at it. Nobody even knew they had network drives until about 3 days ago, so lots of locally saved data. So all he did was ask the new manager if any files were saved locally and went ahead and re-imaged it after she said no.
My professional opinion is that what happened wasn't this guy's mistake, and you shouldn't treat it as though it is. You have an IT environment where patient data that you are legally liable for underneath federal law is being allowed to be saved to locations where it is not auditable and not being backed up. In what hosed-up bizarro universe does this get to be a single person's fault? You don't even seem concerned about the lack of auditing, so what other HIPAA mandates is your company completely loving up and slacking off about?

hihifellow posted:

The computer is back in the IT department on our bench, powered off, until I can get to it on Monday and start looking at restoring the data. Depending on what was lost, legal might get involved as any loss of patient data gets filed as an incident, which goes straight to our lawyer and the bigwigs of medical.
You should be treating legal as an ally in this case. Understand the underlying causes of this issue -- which, as far as I can tell, do not at all involve this guy doing his job the exact way he was instructed -- and use the pressure from legal as incentive to implement better solutions. Legal explaining this to executives is a great motivator to allocate more budget money to this stuff. Your network drives should be mapped at logon. You should not allow patient data to be saved to local drives. This should all be covered in documents and training sessions co-sponsored by IT and legal that explain everyone's duties under Federal loving Law.

Vulture Culture fucked around with this message at Oct 19, 2013 around 20:59

MF_James
May 8, 2008
I CANNOT HANDLE BEING CALLED OUT ON MY DUMBASS OPINIONS ABOUT ANTI-VIRUS AND SECURITY. I REALLY LIKE TO THINK THAT I KNOW THINGS HERE

INSTEAD I AM GOING TO WHINE ABOUT IT IN OTHER THREADS SO MY OPINION CAN FEEL VALIDATED IN AN ECHO CHAMBER I LIKE


Misogynist posted:

My professional opinion is that what happened wasn't this guy's mistake, and you shouldn't treat it as though it is. You have an IT environment where patient data that you are legally liable for underneath federal law is being allowed to be saved to locations where it is not auditable and not being backed up. In what hosed-up bizarro universe does this get to be a single person's fault? You don't even seem concerned about the lack of auditing, so what other HIPAA mandates is your company completely loving up and slacking off about?

You should be treating legal as an ally in this case. Understand the underlying causes of this issue -- which, as far as I can tell, do not at all involve this guy doing his job the exact way he was instructed -- and use the pressure from legal as incentive to implement better solutions. Your network drives should be mapped at logon. You should not allow patient data to be saved to local drives. This should all be covered in documents and training sessions co-sponsored by IT and legal that explain everyone's duties under federal regulatory requirements.

The only thing I will say is that the guy SHOULD have backed up the HDD to some sort of network share before the re-image, but I still wouldn't place the blame on this fellow or the new guy that had zero training and oversight.

Thanks Ants
May 21, 2004

Bless You Ants, Blants



Fun Shoe

To be fair to him he thought to ask before imaging the machine whether there was data saved on it or not. Experience will tell you that nobody who ever said all their data was saved to a network location actually means that, but you can't discipline someone for acting on incorrect information from someone who was the loving manager of that department.

I agree with everything Misogynist has said, your employer has a lot more problems than this guy.

hihifellow
Jun 17, 2005

seriously where the fuck did this genre come from


College Slice

Misogynist posted:

My professional opinion is that what happened wasn't this guy's mistake, and you shouldn't treat it as though it is. You have an IT environment where patient data that you are legally liable for underneath federal law is being allowed to be saved to locations where it is not auditable and not being backed up. In what hosed-up bizarro universe does this get to be a single person's fault? You don't even seem concerned about the lack of auditing, so what other HIPAA mandates is your company completely loving up and slacking off about?

That's a huge issue in itself, one our security administrator has been fighting ever since she was hired almost two years ago. The state of IT in our org is abysmal, mostly due to the lack of resources and thought that was given until a few years ago. There's a divide in both the IT department and the org as a whole; those who have been there for a long time and don't care/gave up, and those who are more recent and are fighting to make things better. Unfortunately I think it's going to take a HIPPA lawsuit for major change to happen.

quote:

You should be treating legal as an ally in this case. Understand the underlying causes of this issue -- which, as far as I can tell, do not at all involve this guy doing his job the exact way he was instructed -- and use the pressure from legal as incentive to implement better solutions. Legal explaining this to executives is a great motivator to allocate more budget money to this stuff. Your network drives should be mapped at logon. You should not allow patient data to be saved to local drives. This should all be covered in documents and training sessions co-sponsored by IT and legal that explain everyone's duties under Federal loving Law.

You make a good point there, I'll get in contact with our HIPPA compliance officer on Monday and she what she says. While we do map drives, redirect local documents to a network drive, and have all this explained in an orientation session (mandatory, and should be your first and second day; if not, you have to read and sign a binder that explains all this and still attend the next orientation session), this new group somehow didn't go through this. Why they weren't saving to their network drives I'm not sure; it's possible they were and didn't realise it. But it's reasons like this we don't wipe any computers for 30 days after they're retrieved, so his mistake was not doing a local backup and not following the usual procedure.

Vulture Culture
Jul 14, 2003

I was never enjoying it. I only eat it for the nutrients.


hihifellow posted:

But it's reasons like this we don't wipe any computers for 30 days after they're retrieved, so his mistake was not doing a local backup and not following the usual procedure.
That's a different story, but you should still be looking at why people are allowed to save patient data to the local hard drive. Your system image should have C: permissions locked the hell down.

If you audit the other computers in your organization, you will find more patient data saved all over the place by mistake. I don't even need to ask whether these hard drives are being wiped properly before these computers are decommissioned, do I?

Vulture Culture fucked around with this message at Oct 19, 2013 around 22:27

guppy
Sep 21, 2004

sting like a byob

Misogynist posted:

My professional opinion is that what happened wasn't this guy's mistake, and you shouldn't treat it as though it is. You have an IT environment where patient data that you are legally liable for underneath federal law is being allowed to be saved to locations where it is not auditable and not being backed up. In what hosed-up bizarro universe does this get to be a single person's fault? You don't even seem concerned about the lack of auditing, so what other HIPAA mandates is your company completely loving up and slacking off about?

This was my exact reaction. Yeah, he should be more careful, but it's insane that you have patient data stored only a local hard drive. I don't work in healthcare but I can't imagine that isn't a HIPAA violation, and even if it isn't it's dumb as gently caress.

Vulture Culture
Jul 14, 2003

I was never enjoying it. I only eat it for the nutrients.


guppy posted:

I don't work in healthcare but I can't imagine that isn't a HIPAA violation, and even if it isn't it's dumb as gently caress.
It needs to be retained indefinitely and it isn't backed up. It needs to be audited for unauthorized access and disclosure, and the data isn't even known about. Legal needs to document and disclose the data loss to the insurance provider and they can't do it because the company doesn't even know what was on the drive. That's at least three right there.

hihifellow
Jun 17, 2005

seriously where the fuck did this genre come from


College Slice

I don't know what the data is yet, just that it was lost. Most likely it was dietary info (dieticians were using the PC), and was used not by employees of the org, but a 3rd party that handles dietary and food services. I think the incidences of PHI leaving a secure location is actually fairly low since our repositories are not conducive to doing anything more than printing and all charting is done in applications that have no ability to save locally; any potential loss of PHI would be because it was copied down into a word/excel document. They do take data loss very seriously though (went through something similar when a few images were automatically cleaned off of a staging server I made that was never meant to be permanent storage before they could be attached to patient records. Ended up being a non-issue on my part since they broke procedure by not attaching them to a record within a certain timeframe) which is why this is could be a huge issue.

In short, any potential loss would have been patient related at the most, while no actual records or PHI was lost.

Bogan King
Jan 21, 2013

I'm not racist, I'm mates with Bangladesh, the guy who sells me kebabs. No, I don't know his real name.

So it turns out that 2012 R2 doesn't work with the MS Mac remote desktop client.

Well it does, by disabling auto negotiate. This blog has a pretty nice write up if you end up in a situation like me where you're wondering how you managed to break your test 2012 r2 server that hard.

Hargrimm
Sep 22, 2011

W A R R E N


Dinosaur Gum

Combined network/maintenance rooms leads to some fun situations.



Humphreys
Jan 26, 2013

We conceived a way to use my mother as a porn mule


Pissing me off:

For the past 5 or so years where I work, the CEO has been AWOL and his ex-wife runs the show. This week CEO wants to be on the front page of our website. Bad move. We once lost a multinational deal worth potential millions because a salesperson accidentally mentioned the CEOs name. Turns out the CEO is enemy number 1 in our industry and many clients hate him personally and professionally.

When quoting to restore a project that takes days to do due to it's age and getting the backups of the original project. PLEASE ask one of our department heads first.

"I know you are not IT but can you do X, Y and Z please?"

- this involves wasting company time as I try to learn what the heck I am looking at and then how to use it competently enough to understand how to write my google search queries to find a fix.

Someone has a Buttcoin program installed on a laptop that has been in the 'stuff' cupboard for a few years. Time to plug it in and see how long it takes to get it to speed.


Not pissing me off:
It's YOTJ for me soon. My neighbour told me about this job with his company so I applied on a whim....1 info session, 2 interviews, 5 tests and now I am in the meet and greet stage and get to see where I will be working (I thought I wasn't going to make it after trying to shake hands with the HR person one day and realized she didn't have a hand)! Triple the pay, stable roster, equal time commute, and everyday is like a reset button, no carry over work from the previous day.

Volmarias
Dec 31, 2002


Humphreys posted:

and everyday is like a reset button, no carry over work from the previous day.

This can be a huge negative if every day starts with a turd sandwich you can never improve upon.

Crowley
Mar 13, 2003


Volmarias posted:

This can be a huge negative if every day starts with a turd sandwich you can never improve upon.

Nah, after a few weeks you learn to tune it out and just shrug and move on.

Don't ask how I know.

Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

by Cowcaster


Pillbug

"Dilbert can you teach me unix?"
"yeah okay!"
"ughh can we skip to the GUI?!?!? I can't remember all these commands!"

I love the fact I was told in my interview "well we don't have a large unix need..."

However I just helped one of our largest customers solve some poo poo on some +10 year old unix system.

I question myself as to why many people in their 30's just decide to give up learning and try to go with the flow...

Daylen Drazzi
Mar 10, 2007

Why do I root for Notre Dame? Because I like pain, and disappointment, and anguish. Notre Dame Football has destroyed more dreams than the Irish Potato Famine, and that is the kind of suffering I can get behind.

Dilbert As gently caress posted:

"Dilbert can you teach me unix?"
"yeah okay!"
"ughh can we skip to the GUI?!?!? I can't remember all these commands!"

I love the fact I was told in my interview "well we don't have a large unix need..."

However I just helped one of our largest customers solve some poo poo on some +10 year old unix system.

I question myself as to why many people in their 30's just decide to give up learning and try to go with the flow...

Because by then the ability to pick up new skills and knowledge begins to slow down, and time becomes the one precious commodity that there is never enough of due to competing demands.

I'm 41, and I know for a fact that while I know vastly more about computers and technology now than I did 10 years ago, the ability to process new information has slowed down and it takes a lot longer than it did then to assimilate it. Also, learning is an acquired skill, and even a couple years without using it causes it to atrophy to the point of non-existence. That's why you see a lot of people go directly from high school to college to grad school to post-grad school in a short time frame if they're really serious about their education.

Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

by Cowcaster


Pillbug

Daylen Drazzi posted:

Because by then the ability to pick up new skills and knowledge begins to slow down, and time becomes the one precious commodity that there is never enough of due to competing demands.

I'm 41, and I know for a fact that while I know vastly more about computers and technology now than I did 10 years ago, the ability to process new information has slowed down and it takes a lot longer than it did then to assimilate it. Also, learning is an acquired skill, and even a couple years without using it causes it to atrophy to the point of non-existence. That's why you see a lot of people go directly from high school to college to grad school to post-grad school in a short time frame if they're really serious about their education.

No I realize that in every ICM class I work in, but drat guess it is just a mental gap. I guess it just annoys me each one of my coworkers feels the need to try and one up somthingand won't ask for help till the absolute last minute.

skipdogg
Nov 29, 2004
Resident SRT-4 Expert


Dilbert As gently caress posted:

"Dilbert can you teach me unix?"
"yeah okay!"
"ughh can we skip to the GUI?!?!? I can't remember all these commands!"

I love the fact I was told in my interview "well we don't have a large unix need..."

However I just helped one of our largest customers solve some poo poo on some +10 year old unix system.

I question myself as to why many people in their 30's just decide to give up learning and try to go with the flow...

That's got nothing to do with the guy being in his 30's and everything to do with him not willing to put any effort in. People want the path of least resistance. It's basic human nature. Why bother learning a bunch of command line poo poo when the GUI tools will achieve his objective?

I'm 32, about dead between you and Daylen, things still come easily to me, and it's easier now I have a decent work ethic to go along with learning new things.

As for going with the flow, as you get older, like Daylen said, time becomes a more precious commodity and most people have more going on in their life. I too was once a young guy who threw himself into his work. Now I'm older, I have family to take care of, kids to raise, vacations to plan, dance classes and play dates and museum trips. You spend all weekend reading VMware books, and there is nothing wrong with that. That's your focus at this point in your life. Other folks have other priorities in their life and can't do what you do. I wanted to learn VMware and had to sacrifice a night away from my family and turn Tuesdays into a 14 hour day.

You're a good guy but you really have got to work on your empathy skills. They usually get better as you get older, but you have a glaring inability to put yourself in other peoples shoes and consider all angles of an issue.

Mercurius
May 4, 2004

Amp it up.



skipdogg posted:

You're a good guy but you really have got to work on your empathy skills. They usually get better as you get older, but you have a glaring inability to put yourself in other peoples shoes and consider all angles of an issue.
So like most people in IT, then?

Crowley
Mar 13, 2003


skipdogg posted:

You're a good guy but you really have got to work on your empathy skills. They usually get better as you get older, but you have a glaring inability to put yourself in other peoples shoes and consider all angles of an issue.

Oh come on! If they ask to learn UNIX they drat well better be prepared to pick up a CLI.

..apart from that. I'll turn 40 next year, and learning new stuff takes more and more effort - both because family takes a lot of time, and because.. "Ugh.." *turns on Netflix*

HalloKitty
Sep 30, 2005

Adjust the bass and let the Alpine blast


Dilbert As gently caress posted:

"Dilbert can you teach me unix?"
"yeah okay!"
"ughh can we skip to the GUI?!?!? I can't remember all these commands!"

Haha, oh, to have that little self-awareness. I guess he doesn't understand how silly that sounds.

Humphreys
Jan 26, 2013

We conceived a way to use my mother as a porn mule


Crowley posted:

Oh come on! If they ask to learn UNIX they drat well better be prepared to pick up a CLI.

..apart from that. I'll turn 40 next year, and learning new stuff takes more and more effort - both because family takes a lot of time, and because.. "Ugh.." *turns on Netflix*

I've always been of the opinion that a *nix GUI is just there as a pretty way to open the CLI

poo poo that pissed me off today:

Manager couldn't figure out why his laptop wasn't charging.

The AC side of the charger was plugged into the wall, the DC side was plugged into the laptop, but the cloverleaf end wasn't plugged into the AC to DC brick

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Crowley
Mar 13, 2003


Humphreys posted:

The AC side of the charger was plugged into the wall, the DC side was plugged into the laptop, but the cloverleaf end wasn't plugged into the AC to DC brick

They're called cloverleaf? Over here it's called a Mickey Mouse plug.

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