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geeves
Sep 16, 2004



Hughlander posted:

Or 1/10th of hours as I recall at Ratheon (6 minute intervals!)

What the hell? How much time was wasted trying to figure out how much time was spent? Asking about time tracking is one of my interview questions, if I hear that tracking is done, I just end the interview. I won't deal with that bullshit.

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geeves
Sep 16, 2004



sunaurus posted:

A huge reason for me taking my current job was that they don't do time tracking. All the teams here are doing agile very seriously, and it's actually working out (surprisingly) quite well. A big thing that I really love is that as long as my team finishes all the stories we agree to do in a sprint, our PO and our clients are happy. This means that I can work on whatever schedule I want, so sometimes I sleep all day and work in the evenings, some days I just can't get in the zone at all and just read books all day, but then some days I'm super focused and just work 12 hours straight. This might sound terrible to some people, but it's really amazing for me.

That's how I work much of the time. Most of my actual day is split between answering questions for others and doing skunkworks projects that will have a benefit for the company. I usually get to work by ~10am and do most of my actual work between the hours of 3 and 7pm as the office clears out for the day. This is helpful for me when working on new and/or complex things when the chaos of our office is sometimes a distraction, I can't always tune it out. I find that if I I get to work by 6:30am or 7, I'm usually here until 5 just due to the chaos. Not always, but it happens more often than I'd like.

geeves
Sep 16, 2004




My boss and I have a theory that the reason you can be "senior" in 5 years is because the newer generation of programmers (well, employees in general) needs constant upward mobility. The other non-technical office promotes like crazy and make up random intermediate meaningless titles so people feel they're advancing.

People who claim to be "senior" but cannot start a new project from scratch or have no idea how to configure Maven or Gradle are definitely not senior, IMO. It's fun weeding through the bullshit artists during interviews. Albeit it wastes a lot of time.

A couple of other things that may help:

Sign up for AWS and use their micro servers to run wild and set up anything you want to learn. It's free as long as you keep it in check. AWS (or competing cloud services) are good to know in general. Use it as a sandbox to learn your way around Linux, Ubuntu, etc.

Join http://codewars.com and just do the algorithm challenges. Do 2-3 a day (or more if you feel like it) and just keep at it. Just keeping yourself in that mind set will be helpful for interviews. The technical interview is pretty much straight up like most of those challenges. Plus after you solved the challenge, you can see how others solved it and learn from there.

That said, I'm pretty loving terrible at technical interviews and my thought process is very internal. When I did a tech interview a couple months ago for Uber, I bombed it badly because, as the interviewer said, "I can see you have the skills, but your thought process is a minefield. Work on that and get back to us."

Failing the interview was fine for me and expected, working for Uber wasn't my goal, but I knew they did the type of interview I would need if I was to interview at Google in the future. I think a better technical interview is one in which you describe a project that you had a big hand in and a good interviewer can ask pointed questions, ask you to elaborate on certain things that reveal you actually did the work and would be good at explaining things to other developers.

Given my experience, the latter type of interview is usually what I end up with and I usually end up talking about projects that I have accomplished in detail taking the person interviewing me from start to finish. Usually those companies I inquire about because they want a lead developer who can run a project and oversee it while not being managerial.

Amazon has a horrific process, btw, in which they require you to install malware on your machine to basically spy on you like crazy while you do the interview.


And learn python. Everyone seems to love python.

geeves
Sep 16, 2004



We don't have a DBA and we're all expected to be pretty SQL proficient. Mistakes happen, but it's usually something like forgetting to index a particular column on a table. In 6+ years we've never had anything major happen to our DB outside of that. We have a shared dev database that everyone can connect to and develop off of, so mistakes are usually found rather quickly even before code review and most DB alters are discussed while sprint planning or grooming because we're not fully at "no downtime" release ready yet.

csammis posted:

Reviews shouldn't involve berating.

Exactly. Reviews should be both review and teaching tool. I generally have my boss as well as some junior devs review mine so they are familiar with the code and can ask questions if they're wondering why I did something a certain way. Sometimes it's the junior devs who tell me that something seems overly complicated and I'm like, "poo poo, you're right".

Mniot posted:

Toxic review process can be a circular thing. We had a new developer who opened a PR that was full of stuff like
code:
if(foo === bar || baz !== qux)
{solveFor(foo, baz); return qux;}else{return null;}

I stand corrected.

Bruegels Fuckbooks posted:

If you're senior enough to make technology choices, you can just pick a new technology to use for a project and learn it at work.

This is what I've been doing more and more of over the last 18 months or so and I love it. Biggest example I can think of is I did a presentation on Cassandra, Hadoop, Scala and Spark and how it could be used for our data. Our CTO took that and ran with it using the technology as a backbone for a new product business case. It's basically stayed my search for a different job being able to bring in new technologies and having the support and excitement from DevOps to do new things in AWS.

geeves
Sep 16, 2004



Roadie posted:

So, here's a warning for anybody else interested in SDE stuff at Amazon: regardless of your experience or references, they will make you take a programming test with someone watching you through your webcam the entire time. Not an interview or anything interactive, just a "proctor" from a third-party company operating on the basic assumption that you are a cheating liar and you and your computer need to be monitored the entire time.

I told the Amazon internal recruiter that I found this skeevy and discouraging, and in the span of one day they went from "well, I'm not supposed to tell you, but we really think you'd be a good fit" buddy-buddy phone calls to a two-sentence "we have decided not to move forward with your application" email.

Can confirm this as well as they are pushing hard into my city as of late. I had heard about this before and recently had a conversation with an Amazon recruiter and I brought it up. She confirmed it and I just chuckled and told her good luck with those willing to subjugate themselves that.

I wonder what terrible management decisions were made that progressed Amazon into making interviews this terrible.

geeves
Sep 16, 2004



ToxicSlurpee posted:

Because remote employees might not work every single hour they're on the clock!

I think this is part of why tech companies are opening offices in many more cities even outside of the traditional hubs. The rent has gone insane near silicon Valley and many people are just refusing to move there. Or just plain can't. Plus there is cheap office space aplenty in some lesser thought of cities. Amazon just opened an office in pittsburgh and Google has already been there a while. Granted cmu being a thing is part of it but still...that something that has to break is breaking.

Yeah, Uber is here too but at least Uber's interview process is more like Googles. Just a code interview over the phone then you come in for a more in-depth conversation and tech interview.

geeves
Sep 16, 2004



Pollyanna posted:

I'll admit, I've never gotten into the larger community of professional developers past SA. Part of it is not knowing where to start. How good are weekly meetups and working groups for this kind of thing (networking, career advice, etc.)? If I join a Ruby, Clojure, or Elixir meetup, will that work, or should I look forward something more general? What do people do to bolster their careers?

I don't go to many meetings about programming languages, actually none. Usually I go to meetings about Agile and talk with others about how they run their agile teams, how they point, etc. since I have no agile experience outside of my company. It's helped a lot with setting expectations with the product owners as well as dealing with other team members. Sadly, I keep getting ignored when I mention that 12 people is way too many (including 5 loving product people to 3 devs and 1 QA) and it seriously hampers actually getting any grooming and planning done in an efficient way.

geeves
Sep 16, 2004



CPColin posted:

Yeah, something like, "Between when I was being interviewed and when I started, the company went through a significant reorg that heavily impacted the team I joined."

Something like this happened to me once. In the two weeks between being interviewed and my start date, they completely scrapped all plans for Java for C# because they hired some random manager who wanted C#. He ghosted the job, and nobody could get in touch with him. But we were stuck with C#. I left pretty quickly.

geeves
Sep 16, 2004



Doghouse posted:

C# is good though

I'm not really complaining about the technology stack, it would have been good to learn. But everything in that company was in disarray and nobody could agree on what to do with me (they basically had hired through a sourcing firm a bunch of middle management to build a new team from scratch and had too many cooks).

I ended up being some sort of middleman between some consultants who were rebranding the company and the CEO/CTO/CMO. Basically I sat in a bunch of meetings. I hated it. They wanted to see "results" but weren't giving me any tangible work. Most of the time it was me and the CMO bullshitting about cars and football.

geeves
Sep 16, 2004



Jose Valasquez posted:

This but replace NYC with Pittsburgh and live like a king on a Google salary with the super cheap cost of living instead of living in a $3000 a month box on the street like I imagine the NYC people do.

As a bonus Uber is in Pittsburgh too so they might pay you lots of money to download all our files and go work for them

I still need to setup my interview there at some point. It'd be nice to be close enough to walk to work again.

And at Uber.

geeves
Sep 16, 2004



minato posted:

At the "5" level, managers don't tell you what to do. It's expected that you're good at CS, and you're competent at identifying projects to work on and driving them to completion. This includes selling others on the value of your idea, convincing others to join you if you can't achieve it alone, and evangelizing the project to broaden the impact once it's done.

This is my main interest in working for Google. I have the buy in from co-workers, etc. to do certain new things or improvements, but they're always squashed by the product board who want to see their ideas in the product (I've heard the product meetings are referred to "House of Cards"). They make business cases, but there is no analysis of what the market wants to back it up. Then we have uninspired features that get trashed by 3rd party reports because we have absolutely no idea of what our users need.

geeves
Sep 16, 2004



So about a year ago I was "promoted in name only". They didn't have any cash to give me so instead they gave me an extra package of options.

I followed up on it today after getting an email about them.

Everything was in line except for my options from last year. They didn't vest until 2027. They expired 2026.

I got it squared away, but it gives a whole new meaning to options are as worthless as toilet paper 99% of the time.

geeves
Sep 16, 2004



Pollyanna posted:

Wuh oh, recruiter dude wanted a word version of my resume. Sorry man, not happening. Not very high hopes for the rest of the process now, but we'll see.

Is there a good resume template out there? LinkedIn PDFs are kinda dinky apparently.

I only send PDF versions of resumes built in Illustrator (why because it's fun and they look good with a little bit of effort). When they ask for word, I say that's the only version I make available. (they only want it to parse into a DB)

What I've found most effective with resumes is the same thing for self-reviews. Keep a list of "what cool things I did today". 80% will be every day tasks, but from that you'll be able to bullet point out what actually was a good thing.

I take that then put in some jokes to see if recruiters, hiring managers or the person for whom I'm working actually read it.

geeves
Sep 16, 2004



oliveoil posted:

I heard that Facebook has a process where if you think that something you're working on - in your personal time, with your personal equipment - is not relevant to any of their products, you can ask for and be granted the rights to your project. So that even if the super broad "we own everything you create" assignment agreement is something you must agree to, people still commonly get exceptions for individual projects, like video games or something. Does anyone know if that's true?

At least from what I understand in California, what you do in your own time on your own machine is yours no matter the contract. State laws vary. Now if you're working on a direct competitor to Facebook that might differ entirely.

It has happened before and there are lots of thoughts on this. Here's a start: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=2208056 (there have been recent articles on arstechnica.com as well)

geeves
Sep 16, 2004



JawnV6 posted:

You're not a co-founder.

I mean, you can ask a stupid question about it, but you didn't risk your livelihood on the venture, you're joining _after_ the first major fundraising, you're squarely in the "first employee" bucket. It's neat that you've done some contract work trading your time and expertise for money (not equity?), but having pretensions of co-founderhood are really out there.

The first hiring round of a startup tends to be 15-20% of equity. As One Person on that team you should be getting whole percentage points, but anything north of 8% would be unreasonable.

I wouldn't expect a co-founder title either. Some equity isn't out of the question. Read Slicing Pie and see how much your situation fits these scenarios. It might give you some idea of what to expect / how to pursue those questions.

geeves
Sep 16, 2004



Greatbacon posted:

I'd say just list it as if it were a project that had gone to production. Even without it actually going in front of users you still clearly had to use all your skill you formulate, design, and build the drat thing.

Then if you end up getting asked about how it performed in production or anything related to that, you can say that it got canned during a reorg and never actually went live, and parlay it into a discussion about your deployment plan (or what you were planning to do) once it went live. Like what sort of tests you had performmed to be confident in it's performance in a production environment or some other things about what you were going to do to ensure that it's debut would have been successful. Or failing that, about what skills/things you learned in the process.

Yep, List it. You did the work, you have the knowledge of what went on. Regardless of if your prior company released it is moot. It could easily have been an internal project that would never be known by the outside world, etc.

Just be able to speak competently about it. What was the goal? What did you learn during implementation? What were your significant contributions? What would you have done differently? Were you a lead on the project, etc.?

geeves
Sep 16, 2004



csammis posted:

I got contacted by a Google recruiter who turned out to be looking for "Software Engineer, Site Reliability Engineering”. I haven't been a software engineer that works on ~global scale systems~. In fact, with my last job (and hopefully the next) I've been moving my career more towards the embedded side of things. I've never been able to bring myself to care deeply about data center networking or ensuring website availability and that sounds like that's pretty much the gist of an SRE. The job descriptions from Google's site and the recruiter are all vagaries about "you're still doing software engineering, just at a LARGE SCALE." No specifics at all and that bugs me.

Is anyone here an SRE for Google or has interviewed for same? Do I have the right read on it?

The SREs in Google Pittsburgh talked a lot about working on "everything" . That when something broke they fixed it but had it reviewed by the team that developed it. They paired programmed and seemed to potentially have their hand in anything. So if that's your type of field it would work.

geeves
Sep 16, 2004




I agree with everything here.

With the right company, there are plenty of opportunities possible without going management. I still don't know if I want to go the management route. And my company is fine with that. So instead, I'm my company's principal engineer now. I lead a lot of research into new technologies that we can use, as well as being an SME on several things in our application and just continually pushing for good change.

It's nearly on the level of management, but sans management responsibilities. But I also mentor. I didn't expect to like mentoring others. Maybe it just comes with time and experience, but I've really enjoyed it. I don't particularly find myself (still) to be a good teacher.

Aside from mentoring, I'm also a medium to bubble up issues (either product or process-wise) that they may even be worried to bring up to their manager because despite my title, I'm technically on their level.

I'm not a glory hound. They know that when I suggest something, I will give credit if it's accepted. If not, then their secret stays with me. I may or may not use this to also mask my own horrible ideas from time to time

geeves
Sep 16, 2004



Pollyanna posted:

Really? I consider web dev as anything that plays a role in transferring data across some sort of long-distance protocol, or is part of a project where that is a main component. Maintaining a REST API is web dev, as is writing the front-end that consumes it and bringing up the pipelines and servers needed to build and deploy it, but the code that doesn't fetch data from an API in a mobile app is not considered web dev to me, and interacting with the database the API consumes is technically not wev dev in and of itself. Of all the things that play a role in web dev, back-end stuff like APIs and databases are the least objectionable to me.

Maybe my definitions are all out of wack, which is totally possible. I've just done a lot of Rails and Node work recently and I see people doing cool poo poo like systems, embedded, writing good libraries, and mobile and I want in. I've had a difficult experience with platform (AWS, CICD stuff, etc.), but maybe "platform" means something different everywhere.

It'd be good to clear up these misconceptions sooner rather than later...

I personally don't view Web Dev the same way. Actually, here's how I've always viewed the "Full Stack".

1) Web Dev / Front End means anything in the browser that renders or sends data, html, javascript, css, etc. You're dealing with npm, front end build tools.

2) Back End is anything that is server side. Creating the end point and accepting data in Java, Python, Ruby, etc. It also deals with APIs / SDKs (such as AWS) that might not deal with the DB.

3) DB is pretty much a DBA without being an actual DBA. Can write some really efficient SQL queries. Can model pretty well.

In my experience, most devs (not all) are efficient in one or two of these. Usually in combinations of 1 and 2 or 2 and 3. If you can do 90% of 1, 2 and 3 I'd think you were Full Stack. I think most of the time it just takes exposure.

In my current company this is the case and I'm trying to improve it. We've started to pair program to get everyone up to speed on all three. It's been pretty successful. I think if we can get devs to be 90% of the way there in their weakest abilities that's a big win. It's awesome when the younger developer who sits next to me asks, "Hey, I need this 'data', can you help me set this up?" and I can just walk her through all she needs to do from the DB query through the REST Api to even the front end if need be.

geeves
Sep 16, 2004



Sinten posted:

Specifically, Abusing the force was a useful overview of the force module (useful for network visualizations and "bubble" abstractions).

I just see a blank page.

geeves
Sep 16, 2004



AskYourself posted:

Your post made me feel small and unaccomplished wow man crazy stuff you are working on.
At first, I didn't feel qualified to answer but after thinking about it well, the concerns you have are pretty much universal.

It's not your responsibility to hire your replacement, you can certainly help with the process but ultimately it's not your fault if you/they can't find someone that can/want to do 3 jobs for the price of one. I've seen this situation before where management will pile up more work on people and push them to work 50,60,70 hours per week because "Work has to be completed" or other motivational mumbo-jumbo.

Your bosses will mostly surely try to retain you. If you do the work of 3 peoples like you said well, they may even offer to double your salary or something crazy like that because they know the cost of replacing you would be even higher than this.

What would it take for you to stay? Double salary? Tripple salary? No more than 40 hours of work per week?

They will probably start by guilt-tripping you into staying and then actually offer you something when you refuse. You have to ask yourself before the meeting: is there anything that would change your mind and make you stay? If nothing would make you stay then don't let yourself be fooled by the VP offers. Usually, working conditions will return to what they were after a couple of weeks or months. Doubling your salary will stay double your salary tho so if that's what you're after then express your need clearly to the vp and negotiate (or don't negotiate, from your post, it seem like you can ask for anything and they should give it to you).

Good luck with all that, and stay true to yourself.

You are not the company.

I would also say to get out.

This was my hell:

~7 years ago I worked for a non-profit government contractor where I basically did 3+ jobs, Sys Admin, Programmer, QA. I also had ~15-20 hours of meetings each week. I had 12-13 hour days + weekends just to keep up with everything. They also wanted me to get a security clearance, probably so I could do even more work (I always refused to do this). One meeting was repeated 4 times each week just because different stake holders had to be told the same information. I asked my boss repeatedly to remove me from redundant meetings like this or to find a better way to distribute banal information. I even started to skip them and when asked why, I told them so I could do my job. That didn't go over well.

I was forced to cancel 2 vacations because the project was so far behind. Funny at a company that gave you a 5% bonus for using all of your vacation time since its employees would rarely use ANY vacation time. I started to understand why my predecessor had left.

When it came time for my 2nd annual review I was burned out and done with the place. It had affected me physically Scope creep was a huge issue that I was powerless to stop, despite being the technical lead. Our review process was pretty intense. Our reviews are read by: your boss, your boss' boss, etc. all the way up to executive management. Also by selected peers if you worked with them or for them on anything.

My boss and boss' boss weren't listening to me. Nobody was it seemed.

I went scorched earth, I didn't just write up everything I had accomplished (it was detailed as hell because I write down almost everything I do each day), but I decided to review the company and its culture. I called out those responsible for the mismanagement of the project and scope creep (they were my selected peers) and basically announced that because of these insane working conditions I would be leaving at the end of the project. They didn't listen to me when I brought it up to them in any of the 15 meetings I had with them during the week or in side conversations. I let everyone in the company know. I simply did not care.

My boss was pissed and I was put on PIP as revenge. During that meeting, they asked me what I thought and I just laughed, I knew that they wanted me to leave. HR freaked out when I told them about the forced cancellation of vacation time (they apparently missed this in my detailed review). I did, however, use it to negotiate my way out of most meetings at let me focus on completing the project, they agreed and left me to my own devices. They let me go 3 months later, despite making more progress than we had in the last year; the fiscal year was about to roll over and let me go with a nice severance plus 7 weeks of unused vacation time. I left with a nest egg that could have lasted me 6-8 months.

At first I was upset because I had a end-date already in mind, but 5 minutes after I walked out of there, I felt so much better.

A year or so later, a former coworker told me that it took them another year to finish the project. When I left I thought we were on track to finish it in about another 2-3 months.

geeves
Sep 16, 2004



Che Delilas posted:

My last boss (from hell) did this kind of thing, and he was ex-army so it doesn't exactly surprise me that he'd choose a disciplinary method from Full Metal Jacket.

"I do not look down on DevOps, React, Java or Python; here they are all equally worthless."

geeves
Sep 16, 2004



Good Will Hrunting posted:

2 hour retrospective agenda..

geeves
Sep 16, 2004



Jose Valasquez posted:

leetcode.com is the best in my opinion in terms of being similar to real interview questions I've gotten.

hackerrank.com is pretty good for reviewing specific types of questions (graph, dp, etc.)

Codewars.com is pretty decent too, but it's just a bit more random what you get instead of "I want to do X type of problem".

A couple of test cases are always included and you get to see other answers after you complete it.

geeves
Sep 16, 2004



Doghouse posted:

I make $75k with 3 years experience in St. Louis, which is average-ish I think. If I am asked how much I am looking to make during an interview, and I say 90, is that reaching too high? Too low?

It seems like the market here is going bonkers (I turned on the "let recruiters know you're looking" feature in LinkedIn on, and I got like 8 messages in 2 days) but I don't really have a firm grasp on market salary figures.

75k w/ 3 years is pretty good in a smaller-market city. (not NYC, Bay, LA, DC, Boston)

Depends on how good you are at negotiating. A close friend of mine preached this to me: "You can command more money than you think you're worth if you just confidently ask."

"What is your current salary or what are you looking to make?" I would never answer this during an interview or let them know my current salary. Always, always let them make the first offer. Never discuss salary in any way from recruiter to phone screen until they say they are making an offer. If you have to fill out a form, put $1 in the field.

~10 years ago, with 5 years of experience I was offered 70k and I countered with 85k. We agreed on 77k + an extra week PTO. My "number" going in was 70k - I was making 55k. but since 70 was their opening I went much higher. I had nothing to lose making a play for 15k more than offered. The worst thing they would say was "no".

The only person I would ever talk salary with is my 3rd party recruiter. I tell her I want X amount. She does the initial filtering on my behalf.

geeves
Sep 16, 2004



Doctor w-rw-rw- posted:

IIRC, I get 20 days, sick days don't count, and can go negative 10 days if I ask.

I have 20 days vacation + 10 sick days. I use sick days as "mental health days" probably once a month. I would love at least 5 more vacation days a year and might negotiate for that depending what raise I get this year (last year we didn't get one due to a couple of bad quarters :/ )

geeves
Sep 16, 2004



Hughlander posted:

Yep, a lot of people like to poo poo on 'American Companies' and their horrible culture when that's usually code for poo poo hole places in fly over country. 25 days PTO, 10 holidays, and week between Christmas and new years. I'll put that up against pretty much any EU work place.

At times I don't mind working the week between Christmas and NYE. Hardly anyone else in the office and we usually stop at noon and drink the christmas ale in the keg.

geeves
Sep 16, 2004



Pollyanna posted:

Had a phone interview with a recruiter yesterday, and the topic of work history came up, specifically time spent at a job. My last two jobs have been 10 months and 1.5 years, in order. The recruiter said they wanted engineers to stick around for 3+ years, which is sensible, but...well, that's not what I'm used to.

I like being able to work on many different things and grow in many different ways, but I also recognize that jumping around jobs can look bad on my resume/history. If I want to stay at a place for 2~3 years, I want to make sure it doesn't, like...go bad eventually. In the past, I either didn't get the opportunities to do new and interesting things, or there just wasn't much happening at all. Those aren't necessarily why I left or am leaving, but they're a major factor.

Maybe it's my millennial nature expressing itself, but I get really nervous when I think of tying several years of my life to the whims of a single company. I can't even stay in a single apartment for a year, staying at a company for that long is like So much can go wrong.

There are people who change every 18-24 months for money, some for continuous meaningless title upgrades because they feel entitled to recognition. The latter are usually the ones I don't want to deal with and usually never make it past the phone screen if we decided to call them (sometimes it's skill, but it's usually attitude that kills their chances). The latter are also usually the ones I run into who collect every new frame work (doing little more than "hello world") to make themselves more marketable. However, if someone is interviewing because they really want to do X that we are doing and they haven't had the opportunity to work with it at scale, those are the more interesting (and prepared) candidates. (none of these traits are mutually exclusive of course and sometimes the candidate is an amalgamation of all of them, and that's fine usually)

I think it comes down to: Do you have an actual plan for growth (both career and technology development) or are you just winging it and waiting to see what is new and interesting next?

I had really good and supportive mentors / managers very early on in my career who helped set a healthy pace for growth without getting burned out. I also prefer stability and building something long term - could I have gotten a bit further, more money if I had been shrewder and jumped a couple more jobs? Perhaps. I'm not saying I don't look for other jobs from time-to-time, but when it comes down to the offer, I haven't been enticed enough to leave.

geeves
Sep 16, 2004



Good Will Hrunting posted:

Industry vets: what % of your jobs (or % of your time spent working, as I realize jobs can obviously change) would you say was "good"?

Current job over the last 2 years or so is probably anywhere between 35-50% of my day actually free to work. Which is about what I need.

I usually work 9-6, but more and more I just come in at 10 when our standups start. The morning is usually garbage time. I sometimes will come in early like 6:30-7 for a change of pace if I'm really locked in to what I'm working on.

Mornings are usually shot between standups and our loving open office with everyone chatting just waiting for the standups to happen. Our standups happen sequentially instead of all at the same time and it just kills an entire hour. So I'm usually bombarded with questions before or after each one by other scrum teams.

Then it's an hour before lunch. During this time I'm usually still helping others, answering questions, etc.

I probably get started on my own until 1:30 or 2 in the afternoon and most productive between 4 and 6 when everyone else starts leaving for the day.

My first job was a bit more relaxed and I was able to be really autonomous and use my time the way I wanted to. So I was able to spend a lot of time learning new things part of the day (and was encouraged to do this by my boss).

The job I had in between was hell on earth. 25 hours of meetings per week. While doing development, QA and some sys admin work. It was 80-90 hours / week at times and I just burned myself out and hosed out of there.

geeves
Sep 16, 2004



New Yorp New Yorp posted:

Then you work for a company that is bad at mentoring junior-to-mid-level folks. They should be able to carve of small slices of the non-trivial problem to farm out to the mid-level folks, then give it a thorough code review and feedback.

And to be honest, this was one of the hardest parts of getting to the level where I am today: letting go of the code base and allowing the junior-to-mids take over and learn from it and give guidance without interfering too much.

For some really interesting things, I'll do a bit of the work. But I'll turn the rest over to them to own. It frees me up to research new technology for what might be next on our roadmap, help write business cases for product improvement and do things that I've wanted to do for years that my company has always neglected.

geeves
Sep 16, 2004



quote:

The company and I finally agreed that it would be best if I moved on after I stupidly used a client's credit card while fixing our CC system since we didn't have any test credit cards I could use. Honestly, I kinda earned the blame on that one, but it was the chance I needed to move on.



How in the gently caress did you have access to a client's credit card? That company deserves every bad thing that happens to it and the option to use it, even accidentally, should never had existed to ANY developer, junior or senior.

geeves
Sep 16, 2004



Pollyanna posted:

This is the same company that let a newbie engineer have complete and unsupervised access to their server setup scripts, which predictably led to production pointing to the wrong API and database for a good 12 hours before it was caught. The users were not happy.

To explain how I had access to the credit card: I was given the CC information and told to use it to replicate the bug on production, and debug it. Guess what happened when I got the feature to work properly?

(To be fair, I should have pushed back on that more than I actually did, but after I asked if we had a test CC and was basically told "no, shut up and do your work", I decided it wasn't worth pissing off my manager. I should have trusted my gut.)

Damned if you do, damned if you don't is not a good thing to be faced with. I don't think it was your fault. This sounds like a systemic security failure that makes me wonder how your CTO has a job.

How big was this company?

We're pretty small. Outside of operations, 4 of us (myself included) have the keys & permissions to production. I personally don't want the responsibility, but it kind of comes with the job and I usually defer to my boss if something needs to be done. Nothing, production-wise, is accessible to anyone else and is pretty well restricted via how we have AWS setup & key management.

geeves fucked around with this message at May 25, 2017 around 17:22

geeves
Sep 16, 2004



ToxicSlurpee posted:

That's insultingly low for anybody with any experience at all, isn't it? I mean like...anywhere.

That's what I made 17 years ago when I was entry level.

geeves
Sep 16, 2004



necrobobsledder posted:

I've been seeing a lot of positions being pushed by this company in the past year-ish or so. They sound like they're trying to run a decent company but I haven't even talked to a recruiter yet because my BS meter is going off the charts because they sound like they're full of themselves.

A lot of companies in Pittsburgh just always list jobs constantly to collect resumes. They don't have jobs open. They just always collect for the next time they go through layoffs and need to restructure.

At least that's what my recruiter friend tells me.

geeves
Sep 16, 2004



I like when I get messages from recruiters on linkedin and they say that my resume is really impressive. I basically just have "Company: Title" and a handful of bog standard programming fodder skills listed.

geeves
Sep 16, 2004



Good Will Hrunting posted:

The best is when you get emails from recruiters who work at companies that you've recently turned down and vice versa. Like, within 6 months.

There's one major health care company in my city that constantly does this. They're whole thing is to get you through a phone screen with the in-house recruiter who then will tell you that they want to fill the position quickly and they'll set something up right away. Then you never hear from them. Then when you finally get in touch with that recruiter a week later, "The position was already filled, I told you they were going to move quickly."

Two days later you get another email from another in-house recruiter for the same job.

Repeat every 6 months.

geeves
Sep 16, 2004



Blinkz0rz posted:

Yeah they're trying to fill roles internally but have some due diligence requirement which forces them to list the position and pursue external candidates first.

My last place was a government contractor and had a similar requirement.

According to my friend that's not really what they're doing. There are no jobs to fill. They just constantly keep open requests and horde resumes. She quit there after a couple of years because she only successfully hired and on-boarded ~20 people in 2 years while supposedly there were 200+ public facing jobs.

geeves
Sep 16, 2004



Blinkz0rz posted:

That's...really dumb and super demoralizing. Why would anyone want to work there?

I don't know. They're the biggest employer in the area. They keep wages down; last time I talked with them they said the job was 30k less than what I currently make.

And it shows. I've seen their internal systems and they are a mess.

geeves
Sep 16, 2004



rsjr posted:

There's a large difference between doing a little self research and asking for advice vs. a history of Livejournal, stream of conscious, you won't believe the new dumb poo poo I did at work today / had happen to me.

The lack of perspective on just how good the OP has it -- graduated from a boot camp, writing if-statements in language of choice and will probably make six figures in most large markets -- and wanting to know if it's the right career that can let you buy stuff. Do you have any idea what the average income is for most people and how cushy your job is?

Please keep treating this person with kid gloves. It'd be awful if they went to a different community to ask for permission to work on their resume and job hunts while taking money from their current employer.

Asking for personal anecdotes in a somewhat trusted community of those of us who have been around the block that can't be easily answered by loving google isn't a bad thing. I remember when I was hitting that time in my life and being just as unconvinced / unsure of my career path.

There are no stupid questions, just stupid responses by asshats like these.

:getfucked:

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geeves
Sep 16, 2004



Rex-Goliath posted:

I thought the whole point of becoming a computer toucher and stacking bills was so you could afford the good stuff?

Exactly. And if you can't afford scales, you haven't made it yet.

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