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Feenix
Mar 14, 2003
Sorry, guy.


Its good. Donít ask questions.

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Pollyanna
Mar 5, 2005

?



Oh, trust me, I've had good experiences with chococheese in curry.

Arrgytehpirate
Oct 2, 2011

TAKE A LOOK AT THIS


Casu Marzu posted:

If you're looking to make the more traditional broth/dipping sauce that goes with soba, you wanna look at making mentsuyu.

Iíll have to try this! Thank you.

AnonSpore
Jan 19, 2012

Bear Witness

What's the secret to fat tonkatsu cutlets? All the recipes I can find online tell me to pound them thin when I'm fiending for the inch+ thick super juicy stuff. Tried to do it at home but it took a hell of a long time to get cooked through to the center and the outside was kinda dry.

large hands
Jan 24, 2006


AnonSpore posted:

What's the secret to fat tonkatsu cutlets? All the recipes I can find online tell me to pound them thin when I'm fiending for the inch+ thick super juicy stuff. Tried to do it at home but it took a hell of a long time to get cooked through to the center and the outside was kinda dry.

Now I need to make sous vide thick cut pork chops into tonkatsu, never thought of that before.

Stringent
Dec 22, 2004

The internet is the universal sewer.


AnonSpore posted:

What's the secret to fat tonkatsu cutlets? All the recipes I can find online tell me to pound them thin when I'm fiending for the inch+ thick super juicy stuff. Tried to do it at home but it took a hell of a long time to get cooked through to the center and the outside was kinda dry.

https://cookpad.com/recipe/2670011

Holler if you need help reading it.

Grand Fromage
Jan 30, 2006

You wildly underestimated my liver's ability to metabolize toxins.

AnonSpore posted:

What's the secret to fat tonkatsu cutlets? All the recipes I can find online tell me to pound them thin when I'm fiending for the inch+ thick super juicy stuff. Tried to do it at home but it took a hell of a long time to get cooked through to the center and the outside was kinda dry.

I dunno what they do in Japan but the easy way would be the oven. Try baking them before frying and then frying before baking, see which makes a better crust. I suspect baking first would work better but have not tried.

Babylon Astronaut
Apr 19, 2012


Casu Marzu posted:

If you're looking to make the more traditional broth/dipping sauce that goes with soba, you wanna look at making mentsuyu.
Replace the soy in this recipe with tamari if you want to dilute the sauce into soup with hot water at the end of the meal. This just makes tsuyu: sake, mirin, shoyu and dashi. A cool derivative of tsuyu is tsuyunomoto. If you don't have tamari, tsuyunomoto does a really good impression of mentsuyu. Make the tsuyu and reduce it to 1/3rd. It's a fantastic ingredient to use for anything from a soup tare, a marinade, braising liquid, stirfry sauce. Toss steamed vegetables in a pan with a little tsuyunomoto and hot water. Makes good umami.

Cthulhu Dreams
Dec 11, 2010

If I pretend to be Cthulhu no one will know I'm a baseball robot.


Not strictly a cooking question but we tried the Choyua matured Nigori Umeshu on the weekend and thought it was excellent, but availability seems very limited in Australia. Any recommendations for a similar taste that I could pick up?

AnonSpore
Jan 19, 2012

Bear Witness

Stringent posted:

https://cookpad.com/recipe/2670011

Holler if you need help reading it.

I can read Japanese, thanks. I'll give this a try tomorrow.

In the meantime before I read this post, I tried out sous vide with both pork chop and chicken breast and I had a devil of a time getting the breading to stick (especially the breast). Imma give that a few more goes too but sadly it wasn't quite as simple as vizzle and then fry.

AnonSpore
Jan 19, 2012

Bear Witness

AnonSpore posted:

I can read Japanese, thanks. I'll give this a try tomorrow.

In the meantime before I read this post, I tried out sous vide with both pork chop and chicken breast and I had a devil of a time getting the breading to stick (especially the breast). Imma give that a few more goes too but sadly it wasn't quite as simple as vizzle and then fry.

Update: These turned out great with the notable problem of my pork being like 2.5 inches thick instead of 1. I got around this by not doing the bit where it said to shape the tenderized pork back to its original size and I didn't have a problem. Thanks!

Stringent
Dec 22, 2004

The internet is the universal sewer.


Nice.

al-azad
May 28, 2009



Stringent posted:

This is one of the better curry places in Tokyo: https://en.japantravel.com/tokyo/moyan-curry/22965

They've got a bit on what goes into their base:

I've been kind of obsessed with this place the past week or so after making my own spice blend and thinking "this is good but just not what I reach for when I think 'curry'" I managed to find a place that sells it jarred, although I haven't attempted to see if they ship internationally. It does contain a list of ingredients of which the #1 is vegetables (and potatoes) followed by fruit, a beef base, and a roux (or "paste") near the bottom. Really the only exotic ingredient I can't source locally is the sea salt but I found a specialty butcher that sells Umi no Sei for $10. I doubt it's even necessary but I want to stick close to what they have.

What got me excited is how they describe the sauce being more veggies than flour which immediately got me thinking that it's likely a modification of the "base gravy" used in Indian take out. The fruits are trickiest thing, but I think it would work out really well to grill them first to caramelize the sugars then boil it down to a thick reduction, almost like a jam. Those two can be made separately and combined later with a beef bone broth.

The real mystery is what the 25 spices are. Chinese, Nepalese, Indian, and Italian inspirations, huh? S&B traditionally covers around 18 of the spices. When I think 'savory Italian spices" I think marjoram, bay leaf, rosemary, and sage. Nepalese I think of black cardamom, mustard seed, timur, and ginger rhizome. It'll be quite an experiment to see if 25 spices actually make a good flavor profile.

Stringent
Dec 22, 2004

The internet is the universal sewer.


Post it if you figure it out.

Pollyanna
Mar 5, 2005

?



Cthulhu Dreams posted:

Not strictly a cooking question but we tried the Choyua matured Nigori Umeshu on the weekend and thought it was excellent, but availability seems very limited in Australia. Any recommendations for a similar taste that I could pick up?

I haven't tried nigori umeshu (though I want to), but I wanted to +1 the fact that umeshu is loving great. I want to try and use it in a cocktail, but I have no idea what to use it with...the fact that it's a good balance of tart and sweet and is fairly light on the alcohol content suggests that it's best on its own, too.

al-azad
May 28, 2009



Stringent posted:

Post it if you figure it out.

I grabbed the ingredient list from the jar. Some differences from my original post as I was going off memory

180g is the jarred serving size. A few blogs say they use the equivalent of a tablespoon for 2-4 servings of finished curry.

Vegetables and Fruit (onion, tomato, banana, carrot (or perhaps panax ginseng?), apples, garlic, celery)
Curry roux (maybe the jarred version uses more roux than fresh so you get more uses out of it?)
Meat extraction (chicken and pork)
Chutney
Butter
Worcestershire sauce
Curry paste
Yeast extract
Cooking oil (olive oil)
Fish meal (dashi?)
Spices
Caramel color (we can leave this out)

So I didn't even know chutney was a popular ingredient in Japan but mango chutney is a popular product sold by S&B and other condiment producers. Indian mango chutney is traditionally made from unripened mangos so the flavor is bitter. It's actually kind of difficult to find an English source, even googling S&B Chutney gives me nothing I can only find it by typing it out in katakana but I still want to track down some S&B chutney to see if it's sweet or sour.

Oh and someone asked how some curries get so dark, the big thing is caramelizing your onions with baking soda. A splash of water to scrape up the fond and you don't get that alkaline taste.

e: I wonder what yuzu kosho tastes like in a curry. It's the heat that really makes a curry for me but I think cayenne detracts from the more delicate nature of Japanese style curry?

al-azad fucked around with this message at Feb 6, 2018 around 01:56

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is

I impulse bought a box of Golden Curry (mild because Mrs Mango canít handle literally any spice), and I canít seem to find any recipe other than whatís on the box. Even the internet just has a bunch of people making the box recipe.

Is that literally all I should do with this stuff?

Fleta Mcgurn
Oct 5, 2003

Who has two thumbs, speaks limited French, and hasn't cried once today? This moi!



Ultimate Mango posted:

I impulse bought a box of Golden Curry (mild because Mrs Mango can’t handle literally any spice), and I can’t seem to find any recipe other than what’s on the box. Even the internet just has a bunch of people making the box recipe.

Is that literally all I should do with this stuff?

Pretty much, yeah. I usually add more spices, but that's a matter of personal taste.

totalnewbie
Nov 13, 2005

I was born and raised in China, lived in Japan, and now hold a US passport.

I am wrong in every way, all the damn time.

Ask me about my tattoos.


You can play around with meats / vegetables but yeah Japanese curry is pretty basic when you've got a box of roux.

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is

totalnewbie posted:

You can play around with meats / vegetables but yeah Japanese curry is pretty basic when you've got a box of roux.

I want to play around though. We have to do better than stew meat that isnít cooked long enough and carrot and onion.

Can I at least pressure cook the meat, or sous vide it?

al-azad
May 28, 2009



Ultimate Mango posted:

I want to play around though. We have to do better than stew meat that isnít cooked long enough and carrot and onion.

Can I at least pressure cook the meat, or sous vide it?

In my quest to recreate Moyan curry I came across this recipe which isn't anything fancy but adds some extra fresh ingredients besides meat, carrot, and onion.

I almost always pressure cook my stews and Japanese curry isn't too far removed from a stew. Brown the meat (always well marbled chuck steak for me, please), caramelize onions, deglaze, add stock and cook under pressure for 30 minutes. Add roux blocks and any "soft" ingredients like carrots and potatoes then simmer until fork tender. Serve with rice or salad on the side.

Feenix
Mar 14, 2003
Sorry, guy.


Ultimate Mango posted:

I impulse bought a box of Golden Curry (mild because Mrs Mango canít handle literally any spice), and I canít seem to find any recipe other than whatís on the box. Even the internet just has a bunch of people making the box recipe.

Is that literally all I should do with this stuff?

Hearty pinch-wad of grated cheddar, like a whole (regular-not-King-Size) bar of Hersheys milk chocolate, a couple dashes of worcestshire, fresh grated ginger. (And some sriracha on yours post-plating.)

Casu Marzu
Oct 20, 2008

me larvae long time


Ultimate Mango posted:

I impulse bought a box of Golden Curry (mild because Mrs Mango canít handle literally any spice), and I canít seem to find any recipe other than whatís on the box. Even the internet just has a bunch of people making the box recipe.

Is that literally all I should do with this stuff?

That's kinda the point of Japanese Curry. It's the least exciting curry besides Mrs Gundersen's curried chicken salad that comes out for every potluck at the community center.

I like Japanese curry, and everyone has their own little something extra, but if you want an interesting curry, I suggest looking elsewhere.

Arrgytehpirate
Oct 2, 2011

TAKE A LOOK AT THIS


I add a big spoon of grape jelly, half a chocolate bar, Worcester sauce, and Korean red chili paste to mine.

Pollyanna
Mar 5, 2005

?



Guess Iím eating curry this week ᕕ( ᐛ )ᕗ

large hands
Jan 24, 2006


I toss a little dijon mustard, ranch dressing, marshmallows, some goddamn bacon and motherfucking srirach' in my Japanese curry ftmfw

Suspect Bucket
Jan 14, 2012

SHRIMPDOR WAS A MAN
I mean, HE WAS A SHRIMP MAN
er, maybe also A DRAGON
or possibly
A MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL TEAM
BUT HE WAS STILL
SHRIMPDOR


large hands posted:

I toss a little dijon mustard, ranch dressing, marshmallows, some goddamn bacon and motherfucking srirach' in my Japanese curry ftmfw

I think I just had a stroke, is anyone else reading this as 'ranch dressing and marshmallows'

POOL IS CLOSED
Jul 14, 2011

I'm just exploding with mackerel. This is the aji wo kutta of my discontent.


Pillbug

Suspect Bucket posted:

I think I just had a stroke, is anyone else reading this as 'ranch dressing and marshmallows'

There is nothing wrong with your monitor. Do not attempt to adjust the picture. We are controlling cuisine.

Welcome to... The Curry Limits.

SymmetryrtemmyS
Jul 13, 2013



Peanut butter, extra cardamom, fish sauce, Worcestershire, molasses, a tablespoon of cocoa powder, Aardvark sauce, and half a box each Vermont and Java. Don't forget the grated apple!

Fluffy Bunnies
Jan 9, 2009

I LIEK AMINALS THEREFORE IM OVERQUALIFIED TO GIVE MY SNOTTY OPINIONS ABOUT ALL AMINAL-RELATED EVERYTHINGS EVERYWHERE i am the very model of a somethingawful shitposter



pour spinach, deep fried boiled eggs, mozzarella, eggplant, carrots, potatoes, onions, broccoli, green beans, and peas in it. Then pour it down my throat.

Doc Walrus
Jan 2, 2014



I just got a triangle-shaped rice ball mold and a bunch of seaweed. What kind of fillings should I get for them? Right now I'm thinking:

-stewed beef
-shredded chicken w/chili sauce
-diced cucumber
-canned tuna
-salmon

also should I use seasonings for the rice other than sushi vinegar?

Fluffy Bunnies
Jan 9, 2009

I LIEK AMINALS THEREFORE IM OVERQUALIFIED TO GIVE MY SNOTTY OPINIONS ABOUT ALL AMINAL-RELATED EVERYTHINGS EVERYWHERE i am the very model of a somethingawful shitposter



Doc Walrus posted:

I just got a triangle-shaped rice ball mold and a bunch of seaweed. What kind of fillings should I get for them? Right now I'm thinking:

-stewed beef
-shredded chicken w/chili sauce
-diced cucumber
-canned tuna
-salmon

also should I use seasonings for the rice other than sushi vinegar?

-cocoa powder mixed with confectioner's sugar sprinkled lightly on the rice, fill with a touch of custard. it sounds insane. it's awesome.
-curry everything
-chili, like, a spoonful of american chili and roll it in jalapeno seeds
-azuki beans, the nori wrap balances it Really well
-avocado and chili shrimp that's diced
-umeboshi or literally any japanese pickle basically. pickled daikon is amaaaaaazing
-bonito or katsuobushi
-literally any kind of sushi fish roe but my favorite is masago
-after making this list I'm going to get loving sushi at my favorite sushi joint

Casu Marzu
Oct 20, 2008

me larvae long time


I don't like vinegared rice with onigiri. I like to dip the mold in salt water and that is enough to flavor the rice when you compress it.

I never remember what it's called but the spent kombu and bonito after making dashi is great chopped super fine and stuffed in onigiri.


Other than that I'm all about the tuna mayo.

Babylon Astronaut
Apr 19, 2012


You can form the onigiri with dilute soy sauce on your hands instead of using salt water. I assume you could also coat the mold. I like mirin in everything. It does a decent enough impression of amalyase but doesn't cost anywhere near as much. Miso is a no-brainer with onigiri and also one of the best things to eat. Dip both sides of the triangle in miso and grill all 5 sides.

POOL IS CLOSED
Jul 14, 2011

I'm just exploding with mackerel. This is the aji wo kutta of my discontent.


Pillbug

Negimiso is a good one. I also like tuna salad but you've gotta take care that the salad isn't too soggy. Same for Japanese pickles in general -- the yellow radish pickle whose name I suddenly cannot recall is really good, so is fukujinzuke.

Onigirazu are also hell of good!

Casu Marzu
Oct 20, 2008

me larvae long time


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X7lronS0hw0

Watch videos from these guys and get inspiration

Through a couple videos they eat every onigiri available from 7-11 and Lawsons. Almost all of them look great and makes me wish there were Japanese 7-11s in the US.

Doc Walrus
Jan 2, 2014



Babylon Astronaut posted:

Dip both sides of the triangle in miso and grill all 5 sides.
Whoa what the gently caress? How do you keep the rice together tight enough for that? That sounds incredible.

Casu Marzu
Oct 20, 2008

me larvae long time


Doc Walrus posted:

Whoa what the gently caress? How do you keep the rice together tight enough for that? That sounds incredible.

Onigiri is finger food so you should be compressing the rice well enough to eat it without it falling apart. That'll be strong enough to toss in a pan and get it crispy on all sides.

totalnewbie
Nov 13, 2005

I was born and raised in China, lived in Japan, and now hold a US passport.

I am wrong in every way, all the damn time.

Ask me about my tattoos.


Doc Walrus posted:

Whoa what the gently caress? How do you keep the rice together tight enough for that? That sounds incredible.

Try these techniques: https://youtu.be/9Hn0R7NftAo

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Doc Walrus
Jan 2, 2014



Alright groovy, I'll try that out.

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