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HJB
Feb 16, 2011

I can't get enough of are Dan




The album that defined a generation. The album that divided a movement. One of the most influential albums of the 90s. Twenty years ago, in 1997, The Fat of the Land hit the shelves.

Released in the UK on the 30th of June 1997, The Fat of the Land became one of the fastest-selling albums of the year, the de-facto sound of the Summer. It did alright in America as well. Packed full of instant classics such as Firestarter, Breathe, and the ever-controversial Smack My Bitch Up, The Fat of the Land rocked sound systems globally, and is able to maintain its massive worldwide popularity a full two decades on.

Of course, not everyone loved it. A generation of jilted music lovers, of the day and now, considered the group's previous album to be their seminal masterpiece (Liam Howlett's creative peak), and let's be honest, they have a point. Others were disgusted to hear electronic devilry ruin their punk rock experience, or neanderthalic rock attitudes invading their broken beats, but by and large they were outnumbered.

I will be spending the weeks and months leading up to the 20th anniversary digging up old (and new) reviews, posting related tracks and remixes, offering my opinion on the album, etc. But...



That's right, I want all of you to share your experiences of and with the album, good or bad, happy or sad. Was it your first taste of electronic music, from which you never looked back? Were you expecting more like their first two albums, and were disgusted at how blatantly they sold out? Are you not really all that fussed about the album but giggle at the naughty word in the opener? Let's hear it!

---

For those with archives access, here is my old, mostly intact thread for The Day Is My Enemy - https://forums.somethingawful.com/s...hreadid=3695985

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HJB
Feb 16, 2011

I can't get enough of are Dan


Let's kick things off then.



NME, 1997 - http://web.archive.org/web/20000307...185reviews.html / http://www.nme.com/photos/how-the-f...-titans-1429373

Here's a few snippets:

NME posted:


ON THE fast-track Hollywood party circuit, so it is rumoured, whenever talk gets round to the thrill-seekers of legend (those party-cruisers who could display a resilience in the face of unlimited amounts of booze, debauchery and abandon that would make the most hardened of rave-circuit heads wilt), the name of one man comes up with unerring regularity. Indeed, so versed in the wayward ways of the dark arts was Charlie Sheen at the height of his powers, so the story goes, that names were dispensed with. He was simply known as The Machine.

Whether a group of one-time Essex ravers turned, erm, 'digi-rock' (ª the entire American music industry) pioneers called The Prodigy have invaded Charlie's consciousness to date seems unlikely but not, as their promotional people would have it, for long.

Just as we can only hope against hope that the feelgood-frenzy summer of '97 provides us with ever more improbable highs (Mike D installed as President of the US, a new Verve single every week, Tony Blair's band reforming and headlining Glasters) so it is our duty to celebrate what is clearly in the hands of the inevitable. To wit, the global acceptance of the Prod's not-remotely-difficult third album, 'The Fat Of The Land'. Because, barring calamity, it appears to quite clearly be the implement with which Liam, Maxim, Keef and Leeroy - the central cyber-personalities of their live show - break America open like a coconut and slurp its contents until it dribbles down their collective chins. It's their Fifth Element, so to speak.
[...]
What such a bullet-headed ten-track collection proves is, for once, startlingly clear. Having set out to create a record that plays firmly to their strengths (in a word, touring), the Prod have tailored their brutalist sound and deeply tongue-in-cheek cyber-vision to a point where it serves as an aural foil to the mind-boggling overload of their live show. There's barely a second goes by amidst the hailstorm of Wu-Tang-esque martial arts samples, droning synths and Gizz's kamikaze guitar breaks on 'The Fat Of The Land' when you're not picturing Leeroy hot-stepping away at his epileptic-on-an-ice rink anti-dancing, Keith bug-eyed and shivering like a (strontium) dog who's just clambered out of the local duck pond, or Maxim foaming at the mouth and inciting us to, well, smell the glove.
[...]
'Fat...' will have all manner of people scrambling to declare it as the first block rockin' post-Oasis amyl-techno-punk album. Which is precisely what it is.

And one which, as well as reaffirming their position as head-warping slam-kings of the pop underground, seems set to be the ultimate party soundtrack both sides of the ocean for anyone who likes their minds scrambled, their beats titanium-heavy and their good times as well-oiled and unstoppable as an out-of-control juggernaut. Like a single-minded machine, in fact.

No doubt about it, then. 'The Fat Of The Land' is one Charlie Sheen of an album. 8/10

I have to agree, it was definitely a block rockin' post-Oasis amyl-techno-punk album by the digi-rockers.

HJB fucked around with this message at Feb 8, 2017 around 21:31

Molestationary Store
May 21, 2007


Some dude on YT deconstructed a few Prodigy tracks figuring out everything that was sampled and how it was manipulated via Ableton. Meanwhile Liam did this poo poo without a DAW.
Smack
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eU5Dn-WaElI
Fire
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ZImvdZ3EZI
There's a couple other Prodigy tracks tackled by this same fellow but since it's a Fat thread will leave it at those two.

HJB
Feb 16, 2011

I can't get enough of are Dan


Shows how far ahead of the game Liam was, crazy to think about really nowadays. And let's use this post to put up a...



Smack My Bitch Up (Slacker Mix)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mzDcm9eo-f0

Never saw an official release to my knowledge, divides opinion a bit but is generally seen as one of the better Prodigy remixes out there.

HJB fucked around with this message at Feb 9, 2017 around 22:26

Boywhiz88
Sep 11, 2005

floating 26" off da ground. BURR!

I started listening to it while I showered today. I'll do so all week. Looking forward to checking out some of the info. I got into "Fat of the Land" my junior year of high school and I always have a special place for it in my heart.

Flaggy
Jul 6, 2007

Grandpa Cthulu needs his napping chair



Grimey Drawer

I was a freshman in college when this came out. I remember how we all crowded into my dorm room to watch the video at midnight on MTV. It was deemed to controversial to show during the day apparently.

HJB
Feb 16, 2011

I can't get enough of are Dan


Glad to start seeing some anecdotes, yeah I think SMBU dropped like a bomb in America. Good time to start my opinion pieces then.




Some albums start off nice and easy, to give you a chance to settle in and prepare for what's to come. Fat is not one of those albums. It throws you in at the deep end, and tosses a few sharks after you for good measure. As an instrumental, SMBU is a heavy, intense piece of music, one of the headbangiest, jawscrunchingest anthems you could wish for. Add in the vocals, and suddenly there's some real venom behind it as well, and controversy develops. Not nearly enough of course, which is where the video comes in. A video which requires me to encase it in NWS tags, so here I go - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BFxaDoyl-1s

In the context of the album, it does its job nicely. If you're not immediately hooked, it's probably not for you, but then you're probably not welcome anyway.

HJB fucked around with this message at Feb 10, 2017 around 18:18

Earwicker
Jan 6, 2003



its a great album

however, maybe its just due to where I grew up, but I dont remember it being controvercial really at all? Firestarter dropped my senior year in high school and it was a rare tune that was enjoyed by both the punk/skater kids and electronic music nerds (we didnt really have ravers there) while also getting a ton of mainstream radio and MTV play

HJB
Feb 16, 2011

I can't get enough of are Dan


Let's have a Sunday Grab Bag, because why not. Everyone grab your Fat of the Land beer (yes, it was real) and sample these delights. First up, here's a snippet from an August 97 interview showing that Liam was way ahead of his time in more ways than one:

quote:

”I hate the internet, it’s a piece of poo poo. It’s just a web of useless information You can’t stop what people do on it. I mean I turned one on the other day, looking at this Prodigy site and my house was on the internet. My loving house. It was like, ‘Let’s look around Liam’s house.’ You can click on it and there’s all these pictures of my house taken from different angles. I was like, ‘gently caress, they must have broken in or something.’ Luckily, it was only photos from an old magazine feature I did but the thought of people hanging around my house and taking pictures for the internet, just fucks me right off. It’s really weird.”

Next up, looking at those Jim Pavloff vids - here's the Lenin poster from the SMBU one, by Frank Kozik:



"Дуеэы Кщсл" meaning "Let's Rock". Meanwhile, Pavloff's version of Firestarter appears to be based on this mashup from 2005:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vZvC-37tCe0

Finally, here's The Horn Track by Egyptian Empire, posted not just because I like it, but because it should sound instantly familiar to everyone:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i_CjeiTHo9Q

AFewBricksShy
Jun 19, 2003

of a full load.

The video for fire starter was referenced in the venture brothers.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pq31ieJEX3U

ytisomauq
Dec 15, 2000


HJB posted:

Finally, here's The Horn Track by Egyptian Empire, posted not just because I like it, but because it should sound instantly familiar to everyone:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i_CjeiTHo9Q

Climbatize might be my favorite track from an album of awesome tracks. As one of the latter tracks, I love the anticipation and then finally getting to it on the playlist. I remember watching a TV show years later that used the track during a climatic scene and instantly recognized it.

It's a great driving song, too.

Fat of the Land was a great introduction into the genre for me. I'm a Prodigy loyalist since, but FotL introduction helped me find other great artists, too.

HJB
Feb 16, 2011

I can't get enough of are Dan


Glad to be appealing to lurkers as well! I'd make a What Evil Lurks pun but eh. Anyway, today's treat:



Prepare For The Rush
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=454gLKnMQQ8

One of those live-only pieces that was played out a few times in the late 90s. Let's impregnate all our breaks. As a bonus, here's a fanmade rework, created to imitate a studio version - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=13i1LaidFXg. I just noticed that URL says "Laid FX", prescient.

Eight Is Legend
Jan 2, 2008


Molestationary Store posted:

Some dude on YT deconstructed a few Prodigy tracks figuring out everything that was sampled and how it was manipulated via Ableton. Meanwhile Liam did this poo poo without a DAW.
Smack
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eU5Dn-WaElI
Fire
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ZImvdZ3EZI
There's a couple other Prodigy tracks tackled by this same fellow but since it's a Fat thread will leave it at those two.

Do you guys know any articles on how Liam created the tracks? I've seen these videos before and it's so amazing to me that he was able to do the same things without the use of modern software.

HJB
Feb 16, 2011

I can't get enough of are Dan


Eight Is Legend posted:

Do you guys know any articles on how Liam created the tracks? I've seen these videos before and it's so amazing to me that he was able to do the same things without the use of modern software.

http://theprodigy.info/equipment/

Have a dig around in there, plenty of resources there. That site's also where I'm getting a lot of the stuff I'm posting up from.

Nam Taf
Jun 25, 2005

I am Fat Man, hear me roar!


A fantastic album by a continuingly fantastic group. It's certainly got a special place in my heart even if I've come to like Jilted a bit more over the more recent years.

Drifting around the roundabouts on my way to school every Thursday (when they watered the gardens so the road was wet) in my mate's raised short wheelbase land cruiser with Diesel Power blasting from his subs will always stick in my mind.

Wank
Apr 26, 2008


I don't know. Experience is what got the people I hung out with then from metal onto electronic music, it completely changed everything. Jilted, I think their best album, continued to blow us all away in how it felt at the time. Fat of the Land just felt like a bit of a sellout and Prodigy were already feeling irrelevant with the electronic scene moving away from that sound. To be fair, I don't think I have listened to any of this since the 90s.

Olympic Mathlete
Feb 25, 2011



Fat of the land was their high point for me, everything that followed was just attempting to attain what once was. The last album was loving dogshit.

I remember listening to fat of the land whilst doing my art exams at school through some lovely little cd player.

mirarant
Dec 18, 2012

Post or die


Pork Pro

What a blast from the past this is. I remember asking this for a birthday present after hearing Jilted at a friend's place.

Prodigy was on one of the Wipeout soundtracks as well now that I think about it.

HJB
Feb 16, 2011

I can't get enough of are Dan


Wank posted:

I don't know. Experience is what got the people I hung out with then from metal onto electronic music, it completely changed everything. Jilted, I think their best album, continued to blow us all away in how it felt at the time. Fat of the Land just felt like a bit of a sellout and Prodigy were already feeling irrelevant with the electronic scene moving away from that sound. To be fair, I don't think I have listened to any of this since the 90s.

This is fair, like I said earlier I expected a fair few people to feel this way about it, not everyone's going to have a positive view of the album. Also gives me a chance to post this:



Gavin Burke, entertainment.ie, 2015 - Seven reasons why The Prodigy's Fat of the Land album is crap

I'll let people click and find out what the seven reasons are, it goes on a bit, but here's a couple of parts that go with that way of thinking:

quote:

March 1996 gave us Firestarter, which took Electronic Punk to a new level and, for the first time, gave this 'faceless techno' band a charismatic frontman in Keith Flint. Mainstream success and magazine covers beckoned. Breathe followed that November boasting what music critic Gary Mulholland called "one of the all-time greatest rhythm tracks ever to be dragged from a computer." The Prodigy were now stadium fillers and the world waited for the follow up album, the one to break them in America.

Then Fat of the Land hit the shops, went straight to Number One, and indeed broke them in the US. I couldn't wait to get it home and have a listen. I didn't have a Discman at the time and had to race to my sister's to play it. She lived a full fifteen minutes jog from the record shop – some distance when you have just bought a treasured new Prodigy release. I listened: opener Smack My Bitch Up kicked the proverbial, Diesel Power was Kool and Climbatize continued the instrumental weather-related tunes that started on Experience.

But something was wrong. I didn't want to admit it. I refused to accept it. But somewhere in my brain, the honesty section probably, something was telling me that it was a piece of poo poo.
[...]
The Prodigy had peaked somewhere between the excellent Poison (1995) - the B-sides on Poison are as strong as anything found on their albums or singles - and Breathe (1996). By the time Fat of the Land came along, the band were already on the slide. It happens to some bands: the album that launches them to superstardom is usually on the back of the spadework of the previous album (Radiohead, The Bends). Fat… received such unworthy praise because there was guilt about being slow to pick up on what a ground-breaking album Jilted… actually was.

There's a fair bit of exaggeration in there but also some legitimate points.

Bandiet
Dec 30, 2015



As a whitey, this was my first introduction to Kool Keith. I've since enjoyed his poo poo much more than Prodigy, but this album never gets old

david_a
Apr 24, 2010


I kinda agree? (Edit: to HJBs post) At the time I really liked it but in the back of my mind I sorta realized there were only a couple of songs on the album I really liked. It is admittedly pretty short to begin with, too. My high school years was when I was still discovering music that was completely unlike anything I had heard before so for me it gets graded on a curve based on that.

I don't think I had heard of Prodigy before Fat but it did introduce me to their back catalogue as CDs were traded around. "Have you heard Jilted? It's way better!" Jilted seemed "scarier" and cooler back then since it felt a bit more underground and less overtly mainstream.

david_a fucked around with this message at Feb 14, 2017 around 19:43

HJB
Feb 16, 2011

I can't get enough of are Dan


Yeah, even the Fat b-sides are lacking in that regard, The Trick's probably the best for it. I might as well link to them:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QKEriy19T1I - Molotov Bitch
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xmg4HxFzuJE - The Trick
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I-a9SYlJkKs - No Man Army

There's a couple of different versions of the latter - one from the Their Law compilation, and a vocal version called One Man Army.

HJB
Feb 16, 2011

I can't get enough of are Dan


A little Sunday Grab Bag. First, here's a July 1997 snippet on their "image":

quote:

Their success certainly owes something to their image. The Prodigy have identities as distinct and marketable as Britain's other great musical export, the Spice Girls. There's Mad Prodigy (Keith, wide-eyed, hair-dyed and with so many body piercings that he sets off metal detectors in airports), Scary Prodigy (Maxim Reality, the black MC who wears snake-eye contact lenses and gold fangs), Giant Prodigy (Leeroy Thornhill, a six-foot-six dancer who describes what he does as "the music unleashed") and Brainy Prodigy (blond, handsome Liam Howlett, running the show from behind a bank of keyboards).

This ~1997 pic was put up a little while back on their official Instagram, so you can compare and decide for yourself:



Finally, some demosceners managed to get SMBU sounding pretty faithful on a Commodore 64:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FqxjsfTLUrA#t=422s(7:02)

Abugadu
Jul 11, 2004

1st Sgt. Matthews and the men have Fashioned for me a cummerbund for my aptitude as a scuffler. i am Honored.

I loved Fat of the Land, thought it was the peak of Prodigy as Jilted was great, but different, more raw. And everything afterwards just felt phoned in, like they would find a hook for the start of a song and be like 'well that's done', they didn't go anywhere with them, just tweaked the hook slightly for ~4 minutes. Every time they come out with a new album I give it a listen, hoping in vain for any of the songs to come close to the a-side stuff from FotL.

ytisomauq
Dec 15, 2000


Abugadu posted:

And everything afterwards just felt phoned in, like they would find a hook for the start of a song and be like 'well that's done', they didn't go anywhere with them, just tweaked the hook slightly for ~4 minutes. Every time they come out with a new album I give it a listen, hoping in vain for any of the songs to come close to the a-side stuff from FotL.

I totally agree with you here. Always Outnumbered, Never Outgunned could be described exactly this way. I'll say that it's gotten progressively better after that: Invaders Must Die was an improvement over AONO, and The Day is My Enemy is better than IMD. None quite capture the same feeling as The Fat of the Land, but I find myself returning to IMD and TDIME still.

freudorbison
Sep 5, 2011


Growing up in 90s Russia, The Prodigy were very much the cool thing for teens and pre-teens to be into, and the video for Smack My Bitch Up was the holy grail to catch on late night TV. But as I was only 9 and not yet really into music, I didn't get a chance to listen to The Prodigy's discography until about '02 - when Baby's Got a Temper was getting heavy rotation.

I really won't deny that they were one of the gateway electronic acts for me (along with The Chemical Brothers), but as much as I loved Fat of the Land, IMO in hindsight it hasn't aged as well as Jilted. Thinking about it now, their shift towards a more rock/pop sound/structure isn't all that surprising, considering how their previous albums used the same formulas as hundreds of other producers at the time, but in a shorter radio-friendly way. Yet there's something about the sampled rock riffs and guest vocalists that just does not sound good today.

I think that ultimately, like with anything old and unpopular - Fat of the Land would have to be put into a very different context to be massively appreciated again.

ytisomauq
Dec 15, 2000


freudorbison posted:

I think that ultimately, like with anything old and unpopular - Fat of the Land would have to be put into a very different context to be massively appreciated again.

Say/think what you will about the genre generally and the remix, the Numbernin6 dubstep remix of Breathe is something old in a different context. It's the right kind of freshness, I think.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gD_d1Vl7uAk

Zyklon B Zombie
Feb 13, 2005

Circling Overland

Grimey Drawer

I'm actually kind of surprised that any sort of retro Big Beat revival hasn't rolled around yet.

freudorbison
Sep 5, 2011


ytisomauq posted:

Say/think what you will about the genre generally and the remix, the Numbernin6 dubstep remix of Breathe is something old in a different context. It's the right kind of freshness, I think.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gD_d1Vl7uAk

Dope remix when it was out (8+ years ago?), as well as Pendulum's take on Voodoo People (as much as I dislike Pendulum)

Zyklon B Zombie posted:

I'm actually kind of surprised that any sort of retro Big Beat revival hasn't rolled around yet.

Check out Lone's Levitate. Overall, while not really late 90's Big Beat, there's a bunch of new producers around taking their cues from early 90's UK rave sound. Special Request's Amnesia comes to mind.

freudorbison fucked around with this message at Feb 21, 2017 around 04:48

SUNKOS
Jun 4, 2016



Abugadu posted:

I loved Fat of the Land, thought it was the peak of Prodigy as Jilted was great, but different, more raw. And everything afterwards just felt phoned in

ytisomauq posted:

I totally agree with you here. Always Outnumbered, Never Outgunned could be described exactly this way.

While I don't consider AONO to be very good, the track Girls was way ahead of the curve and I think Liam should have gone all-in with that sound and style for the album, because he was ahead of his peers by about a decade with that tune and it's always seemed like a brief spark of genius that he didn't have the confidence to fully commit to. Seeing that same sound explode on the electro scene so long after Liam had released that track only confirms this. I remember reading about him being nervous and unsure of how to follow-up FOTL, so it's understandable that the album turned out the way that it did since the more-of-the-same approach of Baby's Got A Temper wasn't received well at the time.

buildmorefarms
Aug 13, 2004

любоваться


Doctor Rope

One thing which always puzzled me; was there any reliable (i.e. liam, I suppose?) sources on how much keith/maxim/leeroy contributed to the tracks? I always wondered how much creative input they had.

Of all their tracks, I was always really enamored with a few of their remixes/remixed versions of their songs (like Casanova, Pendulum's Voodoo People mix, etc), but nothing could top Out of Space, which was the first song of theirs I heard.

FotL was played heavily during my early highschool years, but I had zero love for Firestarter, and only slightly more for Breathe; the heavier focus on 'spoken' vocals didn't interest me much at all. Happy memories, regardless!

david_a
Apr 24, 2010


buildmorefarms posted:

One thing which always puzzled me; was there any reliable (i.e. liam, I suppose?) sources on how much keith/maxim/leeroy contributed to the tracks? I always wondered how much creative input they had.
I always thought Leeroy was kind of weird - a member of the band that was just a dancer? I can't think of another band like that. I mean, is Prodigy actually a "band" or is it just Liam doing 99% of everything?

HJB
Feb 16, 2011

I can't get enough of are Dan


Zyklon B Zombie posted:

I'm actually kind of surprised that any sort of retro Big Beat revival hasn't rolled around yet.

There's been a real focus on breakbeat hardcore sorta stuff in the last half decade or so, with all sorts of artists having a one-off track on their albums in that style, so I suppose we might be hitting the big beat era soon enough, about 18 years is when things become retro enough to be fashionable again.

freudorbison posted:

Check out Lone's Levitate.

Yeah Levitate is solid, it's more of a beardstroker than a chinswinger of an album but it's a good listen.

SUNKOS posted:

While I don't consider AONO to be very good, the track Girls was way ahead of the curve and I think Liam should have gone all-in with that sound and style for the album, because he was ahead of his peers by about a decade with that tune and it's always seemed like a brief spark of genius that he didn't have the confidence to fully commit to. Seeing that same sound explode on the electro scene so long after Liam had released that track only confirms this. I remember reading about him being nervous and unsure of how to follow-up FOTL, so it's understandable that the album turned out the way that it did since the more-of-the-same approach of Baby's Got A Temper wasn't received well at the time.

There was an awful lot that went on in the period between FOTL and AONO, including an entire album's worth of scrapped tunes (anyone interested should look up Trigger and Nuclear, and go from there). AONO ended up being way ahead and way behind at the same time.

buildmorefarms posted:

One thing which always puzzled me; was there any reliable (i.e. liam, I suppose?) sources on how much keith/maxim/leeroy contributed to the tracks? I always wondered how much creative input they had.

Keith's purely a showman, he would have bounced ideas off Liam but I think his main role has always been "do your thing". Maxim and Leeroy are producers in their own right, moreso the latter in the Fat era (here's an example from 1996), but to actually answer your question they didn't have any involvement with the production itself, just the former two with the lyrics. There's some good Liam quotes here that kinda cover it. "I like to do everything myself. I can't have anyone else in the studio."

david_a posted:

I always thought Leeroy was kind of weird - a member of the band that was just a dancer? I can't think of another band like that. I mean, is Prodigy actually a "band" or is it just Liam doing 99% of everything?

This is why I call them a group, though even that's tenuous sometimes.

pfs Write
Jun 29, 2014

get/save/remove


as far as a big beat revival CHINA has some of that. a lot on the 100% electronica label has a late 90s-2000 vibe. this one reminds me of climbatize and some other chemical brothers tracks

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FhD5a_3Xzgg

negative gemini also has some big beat sounding tracks
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zt0oAIWMuGU

pfs Write
Jun 29, 2014

get/save/remove


and this parody/cover of firestarter that i think only came about because the guys natural balding would give him perfect keith hair for the video
.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mPQFLGxM6xs

Bandiet
Dec 30, 2015



Weird Al also made a portion of a Firestarter parody for The Weird Al Show, and he went into an actual sewer to film it for some reason https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gNbx6iF-vQI

david_a
Apr 24, 2010


You guys have all seen the Musicless Video, right?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CDXNfe2W8c8
There's one for Breathe too but it's not as good.

HJB
Feb 16, 2011

I can't get enough of are Dan


There's a near-infinite source of Firestarter parodies, I'd forgotten about that Zimmers one, was great. This all reminded me of the Shooting Stars parody, audio of which is here - http://theprodigy.info/download/aud...otingStars).mp3. I don't know if there's a video anywhere. As a bonus here's Vic Reeves singing it in the club style - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l3Di5KRXo6c

HJB
Feb 16, 2011

I can't get enough of are Dan




https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rmHDhAohJlQ

The album opens with a bit of a one-two combo, doesn't it? Back when I was young and impressionable (as opposed to youngish and impressionable now) I recall Breathe having a bigger impact on me than Firestarter, at least musically. Obviously it's another heavy banger, but it's the dual vocal dynamic that sets it apart from most. It's the one of the three singles that isn't as fondly remembered by many, largely due to the video, but I've gotta say watching it back now for the first time in forever it's still pretty good, if creepier than I remembered. Maxim's looking drat legendary too.

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Avshalom
Feb 14, 2012

by Lowtax


the fart of the land

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