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Tiny Brontosaurus
Aug 1, 2013

by Lowtax


A big part of the fun of this thread is making fun of crazy interior design people spot in the wild, but when people post their own homes be respectful of how personal that is. Not everything posted here is going to be to your taste and that's okay.

If someone posts for help with a design goal, your options are:
1. Help
2. Don't post


learnincurve posted:

If you like a thing then buy that thing, don't worry about it


The ferengi bathroom vandal thread prompted a lot of good discussion about design trends and how to balance form and function, as well as people showing off their real-life remodels or rooms in need of a remodel. So I thought we could do more of that!

Some fun resources for bad design:
McMansion Hell - more about architecture than interiors, since everyone pictured has the same heavy, brown Ashley furniture set, but this site has great primers on the language of home design and some fundamental concepts like symmetry and visual weight.
gently caress Your Noguchi Coffee Table - Mocks trendy design and room staging cliches - mottos scrawled on walls, fake hunting trophies, "it" furniture pieces, etc. No longer updating, sadly, so I'd love suggestions for similar blogs.
Interior Desecrations - Horrors of 20th Century interior design. Some of you have probably had to rip a shag-carpeted conversation pit out of your own homes, and this is the place to tell us about it

Who/what are you designing for?
Are you designing for you by yourself, you and your family, or your imagined future home buyers? Most people will tell you that trying to predict the tastes of your future buyers is a big financial risk, especially if you don't expect to sell for several years. Be cautious installing expensive, trendy materials. The HGTVs and Pinterests of the world told everyone to install granite countertops ten years ago, and now home shoppers look at that and go "well we'll have to rip that out right away."

"That's just my taste"
Differing tastes are great! Some people like warm, eclectic spaces with lots of handcrafted details, some people want to live in swedish teak spaceships (yo). The conversation to have in this thread is whether what you think you want is actually what you want, and whether you're taking the right steps to achieve it. The OP of the Bathroom Overhaul thread wanted a "luxury Vegas hotel bathroom," which makes my insides shudder, but it's still something that can be done well if attention is paid to fundamental design theories like color, line, and balance, as well as practicalities about how the space will be used, and how to renovate without killing everyone who sets foot in your home (surprisingly tricky!)

How to Adapt Your Inspiration
One of the big mistakes people make when taking design inspiration from commercial spaces (hotels, restaurants), design publications, or show homes, is that a normal person's everyday home has to be multifunctional in the way other uses of interior design do not. If you only have one bathroom in your home, you're going to be doing more with it than the typical hotel guest does - washing the dog, coloring your hair, hanging underwear up to dry, sitting on the toilet playing phone games until your legs go numb, I don't know your life.

So when you see a room and go "I love that! I want to copy that for my home!" Ask yourself a few questions:

1. Is this space professionally cleaned?
Restaurant kitchens get a surgical-quality scrubdown every night. Hotel bathrooms employ maids who clean dozens of copies of the same bathroom every day and quickly become experts in scraping toothpaste scunge out of vessel sinks.

2. Is this space used the same way I would use mine?
My office has a showpiece of a kitchen, with white travertine counters and high-gloss white cabinets and pleasingly discreet, purpose-built places to stow away coffee cups and everything else people use. It's a joy to be in, but it's also the last thing I'd ever want in my own home, because there's nowhere to scrub a saucepan or store some knives, and even making a peanut butter and jelly sandwich in there buys you five minutes scrubbing the counter so nothing mars the glittering white effect.

3. Will the effect be the same if I can't afford high-quality materials?
Pinterest is full of tragic DIY attempts to replicate really expensive luxury interior design touches. If a kitchen in Vogue Interiors has gold-plated cabinet pulls and you can only afford spraypaint, will you be happy with the result? Even something as subtle as choosing the wrong wood grain or stain can throw off the effect of a professionally-designed look. Better to ask yourself what you're responding to about the room - is it the color? The layout? The lighting? The fact that there are no dirty dishes in the shot?

A look I love:

I really respond to airy, delicate wood furniture. This set is by Thomas Moser, something I will never, ever be able to afford, but lately I'm aware how much my personal design sensibilities are a reaction to how much plastic and fiberboard fill the homes of everyone at my stage in life. I think that's a big part of today's design trends in general - people are emphasizing unpainted wood, glass, porcelain, stone, and hard-to-maintain metals like brass and copper that show off you can afford the time and/or the staff to polish it regularly. I also like materials that build up a patina with use, like soapstone and zinc.

A look I hate:

Hollywood Regency
Like a lot of design trends, this is fine when it's done with a lot of care and put in the right place. A literal Hollywood celebrity's living room? Sure. But this style has a lot of motifs that were tragically easy to knock off - you'll see so much clunky mirrored furniture chevron-patterned poo poo at Homegoods - and it's been co-opted by commercial interior design that's slowly working its way down the food chain. It used to be only high end hotels and salons did this look, now it's every frozen yogurt store in the strip mall.

Something I'd buy if I could afford it, even though it's ridiculous:

15,000 earth dollars and I'd have nowhere to put it, but prettyyyyyy...

So what do you like? What do you hate? What did you gently caress up trying to replicate in DIY? What are the design element dealbreakers when you look at a new place (popcorn ceilings and sliding shower doors, for me).

Tiny Brontosaurus fucked around with this message at 05:18 on Jul 18, 2017

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Bad Munki
Nov 4, 2008

We're all mad here.



This thread is super germane to my interests right now and the title is on point. I'll be posting here a little later on with my current project: great room fireplace full makeover, featuring a 14.5' long, 4" thick, 16" deep live edge walnut slab that I finally found a log for, it's getting cut out of the tree in the next few weeks and then will spend pretty much all summer in the kiln.

Here's a lil preview:

Tiny Brontosaurus
Aug 1, 2013

by Lowtax


Bad Munki posted:

This thread is super germane to my interests right now and the title is on point. I'll be posting here a little later on with my current project: great room fireplace full makeover, featuring a 14.5' long, 4" thick, 16" deep live edge walnut slab that I finally found a log for, it's getting cut out of the tree in the next few weeks and then will spend pretty much all summer in the kiln.

Here's a lil preview:



That's cool as poo poo! Do you do woodworking or is this a commission? What about the fireplace, are you doing natural stone?

Baronjutter
Dec 31, 2007

"Tiny Trains"


Hi, we like the same things I think.

Another big problem with interior design are different or incompatible tastes. Husband likes X, wife wants Y, they compromise by having a mix of both or random claimed rooms resulting in horror. I'm very lucky and me and my wife seem to have the exact same taste in furniture and art. She likes a bit more in terms of what I call "pointless clutter" and she calls "decorations", which is easy when you're not the one doing most of the dusting. We inherited some nice teak danish modern stuff and just built from there, we are very lucky because a midcentury modern furniture store is close by and sells old 2nd hand stuff for very cheap (relatively). We never really planned for a certain look but we just kept buying nice simple modern wood stuff from the 50's and 60's. It all ended up being about the same price as buying something new, but it's solid wood not particle board and actually looks good.

We've been looking for a nice starburst clock for like 5 years though. Obviously we could just buy one for some insane price but we like to get everything on the cheap. It's actually fun to go slow and always have an eye open for that perfect item at that perfect price.
Anyways, yeah, give me all the smooth teak boxes.

Here's some slightly out of date shots of our place from around Christmas, always happy to hear some advice.






It helps that our building is from 1951 and all the common areas have been restored or just kept to the original decor.


Baronjutter fucked around with this message at 18:46 on May 9, 2017

Bad Munki
Nov 4, 2008

We're all mad here.



I do woodworking as a hobby, but I have a friend here who does it professionally, so he's been helping me out on this one, he has some amazing contacts around the area, so he was able to conveniently keep his eyes peeled for what I needed as he visited sawmills and such. Sent me a message a few weeks ago saying he found some walnut logs that might work, so we drove up to the sawmill and took a peek in person, found a winner. The sawmill will cut the slab out plus an extra couple inches of thickness, and then this guy will actually work the slab down to the finished product for us, as my shop is definitely nowhere near equipped to handle a piece like that.

And yeah, we're going natural stone. We have an existing fireplace that is going to stay, we're going to put up a surround in absolute black granite and then the stone guys will do some steel framing to give us a bump out around the surround by about 4-6". The stone will return on to a couple walnut faux posts on the wall behind the whole thing at each end, under the mantel. The hearth we haven't completely settled on yet, but that's the only real variable left. With the granite surround on the fireplace, the void of the fireplace will be about a third of the entire width, so we're going to get some nice big medium-dark grey stone slabs for the hearth, hopefully we can source them large enough to do it in just three pieces. Under the hearth, some short cabinets (like 16" tall, including the toe kick) for blankets and board games and such. Also probably in walnut although hickory is the other major component in our wood palette and we might go with that instead.

The overall impression we're going for is "warm cozy with just a bit country lodgey," while at the same time trying to avoid screaming "WELCOME TO OUR YELLOWSTONE OLD FAITHFUL LODGE," like, keep it chill and country. Walnut makes for a pretty good neutral dark wood, the hickory can be a bit showy, so we're trying to use that sparingly.

Tiny Brontosaurus
Aug 1, 2013

by Lowtax


Baronjutter posted:

Hi, we like the same things I think.

Another big problem with interior design are different or incompatible tastes. Husband likes X, wife wants Y, they compromise by having a mix of both or random claimed rooms resulting in horror. I'm very lucky and me and my wife seem to have the exact same taste in furniture and art. She likes a bit more in terms of what I call "pointless clutter" and she calls "decorations", which is easy when you're not the one doing most of the dusting. We inherited some nice teak danish modern stuff and just built from there, we are very lucky because a midcentury modern furniture store is close by and sells old 2nd hand stuff for very cheap (relatively). We never really planned for a certain look but we just kept buying nice simple modern wood stuff from the 50's and 60's. It all ended up being about the same price as buying something new, but it's solid wood not particle board and actually looks good.

We've been looking for a nice starburst clock for like 5 years though. Obviously we could just buy one for some insane price but we like to get everything on the cheap. It's actually fun to go slow and always have an eye open for that perfect item at that perfect price.

Anyways, yeah, give me all the smooth teak boxes.

Yeah I lucked out there too. I'm extremely anti-clutter, which my husband agrees with for the shared spaces. Both of our offices are more cluttered though, piles of books and memorabilia on shelves, but I like that because those are our private spaces.

I love having a quest - mine is a set of these rocks glasses:

Totally unremarkable 80s mass-market affairs, but they have the perfect shape and weight and feel great in your hand. I have one, and the low-key hobby of checking for others in every thrift shop I happen to be in. Way more fun than just ordering a set off ebay right now.

One thing that's really informed my design philosophy lately is how much I dislike the commercial sphere intruding on private spaces. There's a big Martha Stewart-fueled trend to treat your kitchen like a restaurant. Chalkboard "menus," plain white dishes, signs on doors, and labels on every container. I really dislike that. I don't need a label on the flour canister because it's my canister. I put the flour in there. I think there's some conspicuous consumption tied up in that trend. Not only are you literally enumerating all your possessions, but by transforming your home into more of a public-facing space, you're subtly communicating that you entertain guests a lot, so frequently that your home is practically a B&B.

One thing I did take from that trend is decanting everything I can into reusable canisters. I really dislike having advertising and logos intrude on my home space, so instead of a kitchen cabinet full of packages "shouting" at me whenever I open the door, all the crackers and pasta and whatever are stowed away in "quiet" unmarked containers. I don't like decorating with movie posters and vintage ads for the same reason, even though I know a lot of people do. And don't even get me started on mass-media "collectibles" like those Funkopop things. They're all going to come to life and take over one of these days, I know it.

WrenP-Complete
Jul 27, 2012



In on the first page! I'm so excited for this thread!

Bad HGTV disasters are welcome, right?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s0SQIJNSaWc

Tiny Brontosaurus
Aug 1, 2013

by Lowtax


WrenP-Complete posted:

In on the first page! I'm so excited for this thread!

Bad HGTV disasters are welcome, right?

Very very much so. Please bring me all the bad design disasters you can find. I eat them for food.

Migishu
Oct 22, 2005

I'll eat your fucking eyeballs if you're not careful



Grimey Drawer

Oh man Trading Spaces. I remember that show.

There was always this one woman who would want to go completely balls out and do wacky lol random designs. Everything she produced was utter shite.

Baronjutter
Dec 31, 2007

"Tiny Trains"


I seriously get a facial tick every time I see a house that has BIG and INSPIRATIONAL words on their wall about LOVE and LIFE are the MEANING for FAMILY.
We were staying at an Airbnb that had that poo poo all over and I seriously wanted to take them down for our stay because they enraged and disgusted me every time I saw them and i can't wait for that trend to die, well it's officially dead because it's not the early 2000's anymore but people haven't gotten the message yet.

It's like working at an office that unironically posts "successory" posters all over telling me to work hard or attain my career goals. I don't need a loving sign in my house telling me to love life creatively or that happiness and joy are found in a house filled with family and love.

Baronjutter fucked around with this message at 18:56 on May 9, 2017

WrenP-Complete
Jul 27, 2012



Tiny Brontosaurus posted:

Very very much so. Please bring me all the bad design disasters you can find. I eat them for food.

Linked above, I'll find more!

As for what I like, wabi sabi, imperfection of natural elements. Modern rustic simple things, but not industrial design.

Bad Munki
Nov 4, 2008

We're all mad here.



Migishu posted:

Oh man Trading Spaces. I remember that show.

There was always this one woman who would want to go completely balls out and do wacky lol random designs. Everything she produced was utter shite.

Hildi

Tiny Brontosaurus
Aug 1, 2013

by Lowtax


Migishu posted:

Oh man Trading Spaces. I remember that show.

There was always this one woman who would want to go completely balls out and do wacky lol random designs. Everything she produced was utter shite.

Hildi!

6 of the Scariest Trading Spaces Makeovers

The homeowners wanted a family-friendly living room, so Hildi glued straw to the walls.




(This was for a house with toddlers in it)

That show's coming back, so many more nightmares incoming, I'm sure.

Migishu
Oct 22, 2005

I'll eat your fucking eyeballs if you're not careful



Grimey Drawer

Please tell me Hildi is coming back because she's obviously the best part of the show

WrenP-Complete
Jul 27, 2012



Here are some spaces I really love. We just moved, so no photos of our space yet, but soon.




Tiny Brontosaurus
Aug 1, 2013

by Lowtax


Here's a good example of how trendiness and halfassedness combine to make bad design happen:

Faux Shiplap for the Fireplace Wall

"Faux" is your first tip-off that something bad is about to happen, and if you follow interior design you know that shiplap (a type of horizontal wood siding) is a trend that's in the "omnipresent" stage and thus riiiight about to become hideously unfashionable.

Here's a high-end shiplap interior. It's, you know, Fine. The wood is real and installed well.


Here's what this blogger did:


Not quite the same thing. At first glance maybe it looks good, but notice how the boards are turning up at the corners, and how the wall doesn't recede into a muted, natural-textured negative space like it does above. Why did it turn out so different?

Cheaping out on materials:
We decided to use MDF because itís cheap, lightweight, and easy to paint.
MDF doesn't have wood grain, which is a subtle but important element in the shiplap look.

Half-assing the techniques:
He used pennies to space the boards, but since they arenít cut perfectly straight the gaps are not even.
MDF is thin and can get fuzzy around the edges if it's not cut cleanly. It also likes to peel away from surfaces it's glued/nailed too, especially when it's exposed to heat like oh, say, from a fireplace...

Hubris:
When the time came to cut around the fireplace mantel, I thanked God for my engineerís brain.
What is it with engineers?

McMansion Living:
The architectural detail it adds to my builder grade house is priceless
A big problem is people move into these featureless beige shoeboxes with no architectural interest, so they don't see the difference between slapping something temporary and disposable up on the walls vs. a space that is actually built well with a certain effect in mind.

This look will go out of fashion immediately and deteriorate quickly, so best-case scenario it's coming down in a year or two, and whoever does it is going to have a lovely time with a crowbar and some sandpaper getting that wall back to a blank slate. There's a divide I make in my mind between putting design on a room, like this, where a supposed architectural detail is just thrown on the wall like a poster, and putting design in a room.

COOL CORN
Jun 1, 2003

If we vanished tomorrow, no organism on this planet would miss us.
Nothing in nature needs us.




Buglord

WrenP-Complete posted:

Here are some spaces I really love. We just moved, so no photos of our space yet, but soon.






These are extremely my jam.

Feeling like I live in a forest is what I'd love in a house, with a kitchen full of imperfect/wabisabi pottery.

Tiny Brontosaurus
Aug 1, 2013

by Lowtax




Remember, design principles dictate that any room with a motto wall also feature discreet buckets or wastebaskets for your guests to vomit in upon entering.

WrenP-Complete
Jul 27, 2012



Tiny Brontosaurus posted:



Remember, design principles dictate that any room with a motto wall also feature discreet buckets or wastebaskets for your guests to vomit in upon entering.

The photos that you are posting work if I click and open them in a new tab, but not in thread. I'm not sure if I'm the only one with this issue.

Bad Munki
Nov 4, 2008

We're all mad here.



WrenP-Complete posted:

The photos that you are posting work if I click and open them in a new tab, but not in thread. I'm not sure if I'm the only one with this issue.

Same here.

e: It appears to be a certificate error.

Tiny Brontosaurus
Aug 1, 2013

by Lowtax


WrenP-Complete posted:

The photos that you are posting work if I click and open them in a new tab, but not in thread. I'm not sure if I'm the only one with this issue.

Sorry D: I was having that problem with other people's posts yesterday. Idk.

YamiNoSenshi
Jan 19, 2010


My entire downstairs is walled in OSB. The back wall is a mosaic of large fake rocks with a huge mirror on one half. It would describe it as "Dungeonesque."

Magnus Praeda
Jul 18, 2003
The largess in the land.

Baronjutter posted:

I seriously get a facial tick every time I see a house that has BIG and INSPIRATIONAL words on their wall about LOVE and LIFE are the MEANING for FAMILY.
We were staying at an Airbnb that had that poo poo all over and I seriously wanted to take them down for our stay because they enraged and disgusted me every time I saw them and i can't wait for that trend to die, well it's officially dead because it's not the early 2000's anymore but people haven't gotten the message yet.

It's like working at an office that unironically posts "successory" posters all over telling me to work hard or attain my career goals. I don't need a loving sign in my house telling me to love life creatively or that happiness and joy are found in a house filled with family and love.

There was one of those in the entryway of our house when we bought it. Tore it off the wall and put up coathooks and a shelf with bins for gloves and hats. Turning fugly and worthless into tasteful and useful for a total investment of like $30.

Edit:

Tiny Brontosaurus posted:



Remember, design principles dictate that any room with a motto wall also feature discreet buckets or wastebaskets for your guests to vomit in upon entering.

Isn't that the prayer that opens/closes AA meetings?

Magnus Praeda fucked around with this message at 19:49 on May 9, 2017

Baronjutter
Dec 31, 2007

"Tiny Trains"


WrenP-Complete posted:

Here are some spaces I really love. We just moved, so no photos of our space yet, but soon.






I'm really not a fan of the first 3 but I can see they are done well for that style, but I love that last one. It's so clean and modern but everything has earthy texture to it. It's like warm country brutalism.

WrenP-Complete
Jul 27, 2012



Baronjutter posted:

I'm really not a fan of the first 3 but I can see they are done well for that style, but I love that last one. It's so clean and modern but everything has earthy texture to it. It's like warm country brutalism.

Yeah, it's nice, right? It's not for everyone, but it fits me/us.

Major things to consider in these very minimal+natural styles are always: 1. which textures to combine? 2. storage 3. how to make animal and childproof 4. quality of materials.

Tiny Brontosaurus
Aug 1, 2013

by Lowtax


All the pics WrenP posted are great. They're also all spaces where the architecture is doing a lot of the work. Adapting designs that highlight architectural details into cookie-cutter homes is what makes people veer off into faux territory, which is were design disasters lurk. More than one person has tried to replicate that rustic exposed beam look with paint and foam, and it always ends in tears. Best-case you end up with an effect a bit like an amusement park or theme restaurant.

Tiny Brontosaurus
Aug 1, 2013

by Lowtax


The Rise and Fall of Trading Spaces

learnincurve
May 15, 2014

What is this boring crap we're watching? Check if Antiques Roadshow is on



Going OT but Trading spaces chat led me down a YouTube wormhole and into extreme makeover home edition territory land. I haven't watched a lot of the later seasons so imagine my surprise at Tye's opening line to the team in this one.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=JBjSA16bzBQ

"Micheal, Page, xzibit take a look outside"

Wut.

Baronjutter
Dec 31, 2007

"Tiny Trains"


Can I rant about the field of interior design?
I used to work in architecture and I still dabble here and there when friends need some part time help. Traditionally an architect will design the house along with the client's input, the house will be built, and when it's done or near done or sometimes earlier if the clients are rich they'll also hire someone for the interiors. People realized it made sense to get this person onboard before the house was fully built so they could make minor changes to some of the interiors to better fit the interior design. So they'd tell the architect "hey, the clients want textured stucco in the entry area instead of normal drywall" or "Is there any way to adjust some of these windows to have slightly higher sills because there's going to be some high backed sofa along it" just little things like that to nudge the design of the house to fit the interior design.

The problem now is that this trend keeps getting more and more intrusive to the point where the architect will design the house, get it approved, construction will start and the interior designer will just start making radical changes to the house that effect the exterior and the structure. I just had to tell a lady that no, we can't triple the amount of windows on the side of the house because the architect already did the math and put the maximum number of unprotected openings there. No it doesn't matter how critical this is to your interior design vision, this is building code stuff. No we can't remove that wall, it's load bearing and the floor below is already built it's too late for drastic changes like that. Yes we can technically change the front windows in these 3 rooms but you understand that will make the house look uneven from the outside now right?

Sometimes they just come onto the site and start showing the crews their changes and telling them to do it, without consulting with the architect at all. They just take over the project but have zero interest in how their changes affect the outside of the building, or even the basic building code.

WrenP-Complete
Jul 27, 2012



Tiny Brontosaurus posted:

All the pics WrenP posted are great. They're also all spaces where the architecture is doing a lot of the work. Adapting designs that highlight architectural details into cookie-cutter homes is what makes people veer off into faux territory, which is were design disasters lurk. More than one person has tried to replicate that rustic exposed beam look with paint and foam, and it always ends in tears. Best-case you end up with an effect a bit like an amusement park or theme restaurant.

An excellent point. (Doing natural looks badly looks so bad.)

Here photos that incorporate similar ideas where architecture is doing less of the job (but still rooms filled with lots of light, nice finishes, etc):
(Though i hate bare bulbs, omg)


I'll see if I can find some more apartment looking ones later.

OMG HERE ARE SOME REAL BADDIES

Tiny Brontosaurus
Aug 1, 2013

by Lowtax



GET HER

Baronjutter posted:

Can I rant about the field of interior design?
I used to work in architecture and I still dabble here and there when friends need some part time help. Traditionally an architect will design the house along with the client's input, the house will be built, and when it's done or near done or sometimes earlier if the clients are rich they'll also hire someone for the interiors. People realized it made sense to get this person onboard before the house was fully built so they could make minor changes to some of the interiors to better fit the interior design. So they'd tell the architect "hey, the clients want textured stucco in the entry area instead of normal drywall" or "Is there any way to adjust some of these windows to have slightly higher sills because there's going to be some high backed sofa along it" just little things like that to nudge the design of the house to fit the interior design.

The problem now is that this trend keeps getting more and more intrusive to the point where the architect will design the house, get it approved, construction will start and the interior designer will just start making radical changes to the house that effect the exterior and the structure. I just had to tell a lady that no, we can't triple the amount of windows on the side of the house because the architect already did the math and put the maximum number of unprotected openings there. No it doesn't matter how critical this is to your interior design vision, this is building code stuff. No we can't remove that wall, it's load bearing and the floor below is already built it's too late for drastic changes like that. Yes we can technically change the front windows in these 3 rooms but you understand that will make the house look uneven from the outside now right?

Sometimes they just come onto the site and start showing the crews their changes and telling them to do it, without consulting with the architect at all. They just take over the project but have zero interest in how their changes affect the outside of the building, or even the basic building code.

Yess this is exactly the place for rants like these, tell us more. I hate homes that have only been designed from the inside as much as homes that have only been designed from the outside. I also think siting and geography are important. Your treehouse-effect living room isn't going to make sense if your yard is bare grass, and that fukkin' shiplap looks stupid in New Mexico.

Tiny Brontosaurus fucked around with this message at 20:34 on May 9, 2017

WrenP-Complete
Jul 27, 2012





Patrick Spens
Jul 21, 2006

"Every fighter says they've got guts, But how many have actually seen 'em?"


Pillbug

WrenP-Complete posted:

Here are some spaces I really love. We just moved, so no photos of our space yet, but soon.






So did a colour palette murder your family or something? There is too much white and grey in the world these days.

WrenP-Complete
Jul 27, 2012



Patrick Spens posted:

So did a colour palette murder your family or something? There is too much white and grey in the world these days.

Nah, I weave as a hobby and love color! I just like spaces to feel calm, so I think some colors with lots of natural neutrals is nice.

Tiny Brontosaurus
Aug 1, 2013

by Lowtax


Patrick Spens posted:

So did a colour palette murder your family or something? There is too much white and grey in the world these days.

Can I interest you in some maximalism?

WrenP-Complete
Jul 27, 2012



Tiny Brontosaurus posted:

Can I interest you in some maximalism?



Baronjutter
Dec 31, 2007

"Tiny Trains"


Minimal modernism with mostly smooth sterile synthetic materials can feel very cold. It's fine for your apple store or high tech office lobby but I probably don't want to live in it. Minimalism with a lot of natural materials, shades, and textures manages to feel very warm while also feeling clean and modern. It also makes those pops of colour here and there really stand out when done right.

Patrick Spens
Jul 21, 2006

"Every fighter says they've got guts, But how many have actually seen 'em?"


Pillbug

Tiny Brontosaurus posted:

Can I interest you in some maximalism?



Little much


Just right.

Baronjutter
Dec 31, 2007

"Tiny Trains"


Incoming light airy midcentury porn








For most of us we're probably renting an apartment and the best we can do is paint if we ask the landlord nicely. It's easy to have all these perfect interior designs with a perfect theme when you're building your own house or doing a major reno. It's much harder to pull off a style or look when your only real control is over your furniture and art.

Baronjutter fucked around with this message at 21:27 on May 9, 2017

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Zamboni Rodeo
Jul 19, 2007

Permanently Offline


Tortured By Flan

Tiny Brontosaurus posted:

Can I interest you in some maximalism?




gently caress. Yes.


1963 time capsule house, in all its overdecorated glory:
http://www.realtor.com/realestatean...6-56229#photo14

E: Keep an eye out for the round bed.

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